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Discussion Starter #1
So I want to buy a youth gun for my kids (10 and 4) that has interchangable barrels. The one that seems most readily available is the Rossi combo or tri-fecta. The only thing I really didn't like about this gun was the safety/hammer. It seemed confusing to me what was safe and what was fire, and the exposed hammer that may/may not be at half cock.

I like the idea of having one frame with multiple barrels so they are familiar with safety and handling the gun, but are there any other options anyone can suggest? Or do I just get it for them and teach them the correct use so they become familiar with it and it would be second nature to them, because that's all they know.
 

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Do your kids a favor, don't get them a hammer gun. Little hands,cold hands, strong springs and kids forgetfulness make a hammer gun a poor choice for beginners. They probably will out grow them quickly anyway.
 

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I agree with John S, a bolt gun is much safer for young kids. Hammer guns can be tricky for kids or inexperienced shooters.
 

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I have trained no less than 5 young shooters with a T/C contender carbine. Starting with a youth stock. Barrels starting with: .22 LR then up to: 17 Remington, .223, 7x30.

Each barrel has a Weaver Base. Rings are "Quick Detachable" to move scope from barrel to barrel= same trigger + same scope from tin cans to Deer. Shooters learn to sight in each barrel + they also learn to load their own ammo. That is how you train a shooter. Hammer problems: Never had, Accuracy: tough to beat a T/C for accuracy. Deer: almost as many shot with .223 as the 7x30. Game lost "0". Barrels for sale: not a chance, Next Generation starting this spring,
 

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Most kids have two primary guns. A 22 and a 20 gauge shotgun. Till I was 14-15 I only had a 20 gauge pump. I actually still have and use it 25 years later. My brother and uncle have both shot deer with it.

Can't go wrong with an 870 youth for a shotgun. There always seems to be a 22 laying around somewhere. If not there are plenty of inexpensive 22 youth guns around. You can get a crickett for around $120 new. A 10 year old may even be a little big for a crickett. They are tiny.

There are a lot of youth guns out there that can expand to adult size guns. I actually use a 870 youth to hunt with at times, and I'm 6'-2".

The Rossi sounds tempting at times. Just not the right gun.
 

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Marksmanship training for young shooters should be with a Rifle. I Had a .410 at home on the Farm but used the old Winchester 99% of the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I just like the Rossi because with a youth stock, you have multiple youth guns, and everything is the same regardless of the cartridge/barrel. He has a cricket, which is too small now. I have a several other guns that are the right calibers for him to start, just not the right stock(i.e. youth) So, my options are then, buy the rossi, buy individual youth models, or let him learn on guns that actually don't fit him?
 

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Jay there is alot you can do. I have 2 rossi's, and a youth Nef. All 3 come with 3 barrls a piece. 243, 22 and 410. My girls have shorter arms and the youth models fit them better. The rossi's are actually accurate for the price. Have you thought about possibly a cheaper adult rifle cutting or finding a youth stock and switching as they get older. A friend did that with a savage 110 243. He cut the butt off the stock and when his son was older he found a stock on ebay for $30. Just something to think about.
 

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I agree with the comments of not giving a kid a hammer gun.

Get them their own rifles and shotguns. Most rifles made today come in youth models and the stocks can be upgraded later. Mossberg pump shotguns are fairly cheap as well, and come in youth models with optional adult stocks.

Give them something they can use the rest of their lives and think about how you gave them such a quality firearm when they were kids.
 
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