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Hello all,

I've had a Parker Hale in 30-06(beautiful rifle) for 18 years now, and it hasn't seen the woods yet(I know I know
). I was wondering if anyone else out there has one, and what you think of it?
 

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Never owned one as they're a bit too gaudy for me-reminded me of the old Weatherbys....lots of folks like their appearance though....ones I've seen were nicely finished and had very slim barrels which demands letting the barrel cool between shots if optimum accuracy is to be achieved....

Any I've seen at the range shot OK....they were made to hunt with, not shoot tiny groups....

Take it out, shoot it and go hunting with it....
 

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At one time a friend had three of them, all built on commercial "Mauser" magnum actions and all thumpers: 300 Wby, 375 H&H and 458 Win. Recall they had very nice wood and high lustre metal finishes, but don't remember them being quite as gaudy as Weatherbys?



All shot well and were very nicely done, although he eventually rebarreled the 300 Wby with a 26" SS barrel.
 

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My uncles (who are twins) have a matched pair of them. One is a 30-06 the other is a 270.They have killed many deer and 2 bear between them. They were ok accuracy wise until they had them glass bedded now they are very accurate.They don't even use them anymore though as they now both collect Weatherbys. I have seen a couple Parker Hales at gun auctions and they usually go cheaper than say a Ruger 77 or a model 70 Winchester. One of these times I'll find one in a 300 magnum and bite the bullet and get it.
 

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Yep. They're about as gaudy as Weatherbys were, before they got really gaudy. Gee, I said "not quite as gaudy".



All three of my bud's rifles had darker wood than the one in your pic, as I recall them.
 

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I guess my 22-250 is very gaudy then because the wood looks like high end furniture and it has a ss bull barrel..By the way I'll keep it anyhow.I treat it better than Fort Knox does with gold.Oh and it is a hunting rifle.Groudhogs and yotes.Any mark on the gun will be a fond memory.Each gun you own should have a special meaning to it.Saving a gun to make money isn't on my list.
 

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Diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks....I've seen some dark-wooded PHs but could never get past that Kalifornia-inspired stock....

Didn't BSA make them?
 

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Didn't BSA make them?
Rings a bell, probably? IIRC, my buddy bought them all in the same year, most likely back in the 70s.

All but the 458 went on successful trips out west, or to Canada. By the time he got around to going for moose, he had a 460 Wby.

Now that thing was gaudy.
 

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Always wondered how the Brits came up with the stock design for the PHs....seemed out of character, to say the least, considering what the old gun houses in London were used to turning out....guess they were after American $ when that kind of stock was in vogue....

LOL....old Roy knew how to get attention to his guns-that's for sure!
 

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Not all Parker Hales were "Gaudy". Most were not. the Super models and the Varmint models were copies of the Weatherby with the reverse 45 degree forend tip.

Unfortunately, most Americans (at that time) liked the glossy models and they sold best; maybe there were thought of as a cheaper Weatherby.
 

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The original Weatherbys were built on commercial "Mauser" actions, if not mistaken, so they would've looked very much like the Parker Hales that came along much later.

Only thing I've ever seen that looked gaudier than some Weatherbys, were those Jap Golden Eagles. Ich! Not much of a fan of high gloss stock finishes, fore end caps or outlandish pistol grips.

My personal tastes run to classic style stocks in dark straight grained walnut, with satin oil finishes.
 

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Weatherby did use some eupro-mausers on production rifles, but I think his first ones were on Enfield actions (1917). the 1917 are LONG. If you look closely at a mark V today you will see the remaining 1917 thumb push safety.
 

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DennyF said:
Didn't BSA make them?
Rings a bell, probably? IIRC, my buddy bought them all in the same year, most likely back in the 70s.

All but the 458 went on successful trips out west, or to Canada. By the time he got around to going for moose, he had a 460 Wby.
Now that thing was gaudy.


 

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Forget now where in Canada that my buddy killed his moose with the 460, but the guide was not impressed with it, even after he watched Sam shoot the thing. The guide went on and on about people coming armed with cannons, but couldn't shoot them well.

Sam bet the guide that he would drop a moose with one shot, which really got the guide wound up. Day of the successful hunt, Sam popped the bull in the shoulder, IIRC and it staggered a bit, but didn't go down right away. The guide insisted he shoot it again, my buddy said nope, it ain't going anywere but down. Within a few more seconds, the moose keeled.

This was a guy that could shoot the 375 H&H like most of us can handle a 30-06. Spent enough time shooting with him over the years, to know how well he handled anything, regardless of recoil. Not me, don't like much recoil, never did, even before I had shoulder problems.

Same buddy killed a Caribou up on the George River with the 300 Wby. at over 300 yards, many years before that moose hunt. His cousin was farther up along the river with their guide and both watched the shot with their binocs. Guide said "Caribou too far", when the 300 cracked. When it started to drop, guide said "Caribou stumble". The cousin said no, Caribou is dead and so it was.



Sam had a similar experience in the Jackson Hole area, when he killed a dandy elk with the 375, probably around 1980? Guide thought the elk was too far away, Sam didn't and dropped it where it stood.

This was a guy that also built heavy varminters and routinely killed woodchucks with them, out beyond 800 yards and killed more than a few past 1200 yards.
 

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That he could. Was pretty good with a six shooter, too.

He and I once walked into Shelly's Sporting Goods in New Cumberland, many years ago and a new kid behind the gun counter blurted out, "There's the guy that just cost me a bunch of money".

The other clerks got out of the way, because they all knew my buddy pretty well. My buddy glared at the kid, one of the other clerks asked him what he was yappin' about and the newbie quickly explained that he'd been at the range a few weeks before and had seen Sam shooting his M29 8-3/8" at 100 yards, was so impressed he had to buy one.

 
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