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Not trying to slam anybody. Although I would think the crossbow is a more efficient weapon than a compound, it seems that more deer are wounded by crossbow shooters. I've talked to a lot of hunters that have wounded deer shooting a crossbow. See it on the forum as well. Just wondering why this is.
 

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it seems that more deer are wounded by crossbow shooters.

Basically you are asking about a factual, logical reason why more deer are wounded by crossbows than by other weapons.

Such a reason may or may not exist....I would think if it did, it would be some combination of arrow (bolt) weight, speed, type of broadhead, etc. All of these things are measurable and could be simulated in a lab somewhere.

The outliers would be shot placement, hunter skill, hunter ability to keep calm under the pressure of taking a shot, etc....none of which are measurable.


As far as your statement that crossbows wound more deer.....again....any numbers to support? studies done, etc?


Not trying to prove or disprove your statement...only pointing out that opinions rendered to a false or unproven premise are seldom worth the time it takes to write them, and Lord knows there are plenty of opinions on here.

Also, just to clarify...I am not a cross bow hunter.
 

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Don't really agree with the OP suggesting that either. A crossbow is easier for someone unfortunate enough to have a handicap preventing a longbow or compound bow to be ethically used, but the differences end there IMO. A responsible hunter tunes his/her equipment as best possible, practices to gain proficiency with it, reguardless of it's description, and takes only shots that are reasonably able to be accomplished and effect a clean kill.
 

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I think I would say ," there is more game wounded by all weapons", because a person dose not practice enough, doesn't take there time to make a well place shot, or should let the animal walk because its not the perfect shot placement.
 

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It's not the weapon it's the person using the weapon...that said... crossbows have the least of a learning curve than other bows...a first time archery hunter is likely going to choose a crossbow to enter the archery seasons...the more inexperienced hunters will make the most mistakes.

Your mistake is separating hunters by their choice of weapons...instead of experience.
 

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It's not the weapon it's the person using the weapon...that said... crossbows have the least of a learning curve than other bows...a first time archery hunter is likely going to choose a crossbow to enter the archery seasons...the more inexperienced hunters will make the most mistakes.

Your mistake is separating hunters by their choice of weapons...instead of experience.
That is a very excellent comment.


When I got into archery hunting, I had some hard-core friends to help me learn. I had to reprogram my brain to bow hunt, not rifle hunt, there are a lot of different factors.


I think some of the manufacturers of crossbows and modern high-tech compounds are at fault. Publishing all of these insane bow speeds (which are measured under perfect, precise conditions) and people without the experience think that 50 and 60 yard shots are commonplace when in fact the vast majority of bow hunters, regardless of the bow type, have an ethical shot range much less than that.


Before it starts, I know there are individuals who can and have made such shots. What I am saying is, take 10,000 random bow hunters and drop them into a concert hall, then pull out 100 of the crowd. How many of the 100 would be able to make the ethical shot under hunting conditions at a distance of 50 yards? Not many is my bet. I've been at it now for more than 20 years, and my "in the woods" kill distance is 30 yards. I can shoot farther in my back yard or at 3D targets, but after sitting in a tree for a few hours in cooler weather, maybe in a seated or twisted position, well, you get the drift.


It is with experience and good mentoring that you learn your personal limits. With any weapon. It's just that a crossbow lends itself a little bit more to taking some experiences a person may have had as a rifle hunter and transferring them to the crossbow because it looks and handles like a rifle. That 50-yard shot may be a slam dunk with the .270, but it is anything but with any bow.


But gun hunters to the same thing. The traditional "sight in" is off of a bench at a measured 100 yards over a flat landscape. People dial in their scopes and can make tight groups off the sandbags. Try to have them hit a pie plate, standing off hand, at 50 yards. Once again, it's back to the experience and mentoring of the hunter.
 

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Not trying to slam anybody. Although I would think the crossbow is a more efficient weapon than a compound, it seems that more deer are wounded by crossbow shooters. I've talked to a lot of hunters that have wounded deer shooting a crossbow. See it on the forum as well. Just wondering why this is.
You talked to a lot of hunters? How many would that be? I don't know how many you've talked to, but I Admin a hunting dot com where I'd bet there are a heck of a lot more success stories by crossbow users than this 'lot' that you've talked to who indicate some sort of negative results. Maybe you could come back with some published results of studies that show your theory to be true, but until you can do just that there can be no value to such a theory.
 

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... I think some of the manufacturers of crossbows and modern high-tech compounds are at fault. Publishing all of these insane bow speeds (which are measured under perfect, precise conditions) and people without the experience think that 50 and 60 yard shots are commonplace when in fact the vast majority of bow hunters, regardless of the bow type, have an ethical shot range much less than that....


... I've been at it now for more than 20 years, and my "in the woods" kill distance is 30 yards. I can shoot farther in my back yard or at 3D targets, but after sitting in a tree for a few hours in cooler weather, maybe in a seated or twisted position, well, you get the drift.


It is with experience and good mentoring that you learn your personal limits... Once again, it's back to the experience and mentoring of the hunter.

^ This ^

Crossbows have their advantages, but trajectory and ballistics aren't among them. Archery is a short range game, even with a crossbow.
 

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I think a lot of crossbow hunters are ground hunting when they take shots. These result in high hits ending up with little blood trailing because the deer is bleeding internally.
Shooting from an elevated tree stand will generally have a lower exit wound resulting in somewhere for the blood to drain making tracking a wounded deer much easier.

This is just a guess as I have witnessed it personally. I have recovered several of my deer despite little to no blood trail.
But without concrete numbers, my experiences may just be an anomaly.....
 

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I don't believe anybody could prove what weapons wound more deer and it goes back to the person not the weapon on the type of ethical shots their taking. Every year I hear guys(usually the same guys) talking about losing deer and for the most part it all comes down to shot placement.

I personally don't like when rifle hunters blaze away at running deer 200 yards away (which i see a lot of around where i live) doesn't make rifle hunters bad just gotta question that individuals judgement. Yes everybody knows somebody that can shoot a Nat off deer hind end running but reality is most guys can't.
 

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As a vertical bow to crossbow convert, I'll say without a doubt a crossbow is a more efficient weapon than a vertical bow in the hands of an experienced shooter. If there's a problem, I'd say it lies with folks not understanding the effective range of a crossbow, and folks pushing the envelope on shot distances. However, that problem lies with the shooter not the weapon. Education is key. A while back the PA Game News contained an interesting article regarding a deer's reaction time, shot distance and arrow/bolt speed and had a chart indicting the effective range of the weapon, based on the arrow/bolt speed.
 

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As a vertical bow to crossbow convert, I'll say without a doubt a crossbow is a more efficient weapon than a vertical bow in the hands of an experienced shooter. If there's a problem, I'd say it lies with folks not understanding the effective range of a crossbow, and folks pushing the envelope on shot distances. However, that problem lies with the shooter not the weapon. Education is key. A while back the PA Game News contained an interesting article regarding a deer's reaction time, shot distance and arrow/bolt speed and had a chart indicting the effective range of the weapon, based on the arrow/bolt speed.

I posted info from that article in another thread. Here it goes:


There was an excellent article in the October issue of Pennsylvania Game News called "Crossbow Longshots" by Darren Cummings, who is an engineer by trade. The article explores all of the issues with shooting a crossbow as range increases, as well as other factors such as deer ducking the string at various distances. Some take a ways from the article:

Trajectory - A 450-grain bolt moving at 375 fps will drop:
@ 25 yards - 8 inches
@ 50 yards - 3 feet
@ 100 yards - 15 feet

Wind drift - A crosswind of only 7 mph will cause that same bolt to drift 3.5 feet @ 100 yards.

Ranging errors

If you miss-range or miss-judge a deer @ 30 yards, but the true distance is 35 yards, you will miss 4 inches low.
If you miss-range or miss-judge a deer @ 95 yards, but the true distance is 100 yards, you will miss 21 inches low.

Ducking the bolt. There is some math involved in the authors calculations, see the article if you are interested in the math, but here are his calculated "Too Close To Duck" distances for various speed bolts. In other words, a deer at a greater distance than those shown would be likely to be able to duck the bolt.

Bolt speed - Too Close To Duck Distance
250 fps - 26 yards
300 fps - 32 yards
350 fps - 40 yards
400 fps - 45 yards
430 fps - 50 yards
 

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Bbutz show me on the forums where crossbow hunters wound deer and other types of weapons don't.When this goes the wrong direction this thread will be closed.The opening statement is half way there.
This is a broadhead study but is does track vertical bow vs crossbow statistics. I think it disproves the op's opinion and provides some facts.

https://www.qdma.com/does-broadhead-choice-really-matter/


https://www.qdma.com/high-deer-recovery-rates-fixed-blade-mechanical-broadheads/
 

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I recently ran into a compound bow hunter that I'm an acquaintance of and asked him how his season went. He told me he hit a small 8 point in the chest on the last day, but after tracking it for 200 yards it headed up a hill and he lost the blood trail. He then proceeded to tell me that since the deer was hit in the front, that when it started up the hill, all of its blood went to the back of the deer and that's why it stopped bleeding. :facepalm: It doesn't matter what the weapon is...you can't fix stupid.
 

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this post is complete nonsense with out facts to back it up. i would think more deer are wounded and lost by gun hunters. long range, fingers cross shooting hoping to get one.
deer drives where people are taking pot shots are deer running between trees and brush. taking running shots at deer going thru open fields faster than a race car driver. and if the deer doesnt falter , jump, stagger or show any signs of a hit, no one is going to walk 200 or 500 yards to look for blood. they just sit and wait for the next one.


(this makes just as much sense as saying crossbow users wound more deer)
 

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Too many think it OK to shoot at deer.

Some types of gear may attract those of that mindset over others.

Had the guys w 40K trucks coming in the night before the opener to bore sight their slug guns.
Some people just take wounding a deer as "no big deal".

And some think losing a big buck also, "no big deal".

I don't understand.......they must have big bucks on large private chunks of ground and unlimited vacation days.
Even if they do......the lack of respect just boggles my mind.
 
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