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Can you explain more about how this?

They are working 7 days per week, 12 hours per day?

Just week after week, month after month?

How is that possible?

Do they get days off? Vacation time?
Try the RR.
12 hrs+ a day. 8 hours rest but they can call you out after 6 hours off, 7 days a week 365 a year. Yep you get vacation. If you have the seniority you may have 2 days off a week. No such thing as a holiday. On call 24 hours a day 365 a year. And if you miss a call for work to many time you'll end up fired.
 

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Try the RR.
12 hrs+ a day. 8 hours rest but they can call you out after 6 hours off, 7 days a week 365 a year. Yep you get vacation. If you have the seniority you may have 2 days off a week. No such thing as a holiday. On call 24 hours a day 365 a year. And if you miss a call for work to many time you'll end up fired.
But again, no one held a gun to their heads to work for the RR, it was the choice they made.
The company I worked for once created a new position, "Senior Maintenance/Engineering Technician" which after completing the required training also included a big fat raise. It was open to all the eighty or so maintenance associates at the time but only five of us applied and completed the program. What did the other seventy or so do? They complained they weren't making enough money!
 

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Can you explain more about how this?

They are working 7 days per week, 12 hours per day?

Just week after week, month after month?

How is that possible?

Do they get days off? Vacation time?
The Ammo and components companies are working the same way. When help is short or demand is high the traditional work schedule goes out the door. Greed drives the workers to work that schedule.
 

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From the article:

The plants have all continued to operate throughout the coronavirus pandemic, but Osborn said that for much of that time workers were putting in 12-hour shifts, seven days a week to keep up production while so many people were out because of the virus.
 

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From the article:

The plants have all continued to operate throughout the coronavirus pandemic, but Osborn said that for much of that time workers were putting in 12-hour shifts, seven days a week to keep up production while so many people were out because of the virus.
I’d be surprised if the company didn’t reach out to the federal government to have the employees reclassified as essential works during a pandemic and ordered back to work.
 

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From the article:

The plants have all continued to operate throughout the coronavirus pandemic, but Osborn said that for much of that time workers were putting in 12-hour shifts, seven days a week to keep up production while so many people were out because of the virus.
Emphasis added to the last 4 words. The next sentence was: “The level we were working at is unsustainable,” Osborn said. And I agree with that statement. When I worked at the job I chose we worked 70-80 hours a week from February to Mid-April. Yes, only 2.5 months and it was exhausting near the end. 7 days a week is all work and no play....and this was every year for 25+ years. But....I chose it!

It seems to me the union is complaining about this apparent temporary labor force shortage because of employees getting COVID and being out for likely a minimum of 2 weeks. I also believe it's not a permanent situation.

It's tough for me to find sympathy for a labor force making those kind of bucks. People will continue to eat cereal and the labor to make it will always be needed. I would also have to believe those jobs would be looked at very highly and people would line up to have one. Especially in central Pa where the cost of living is very reasonable.

MHO
 

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Those guys earn over 100K a year and they ae on strike. One of the things they are striking for is for new hires to earn as much as veteran employees.
there is no way a new guy should get what the veteran employees make. they start at the bottom and earn their way to the top. Unions just want everyone at top dollar so the union collects more in membership fees.
 

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there is no way a new guy should get what the veteran employees make. they start at the bottom and earn their way to the top. Unions just want everyone at top dollar so the union collects more in membership fees.
No one wants to pay their dues any more, don't know anything but want to get right to the top immediately. Sign of the times.
 

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No one wants to pay their dues any more, don't know anything but want to get right to the top immediately. Sign of the times.
I'll start by saying that I have been part of two contract negotiations for a union. With that said I struggle with this. I originally felt the same way you guys do however it was brought to my attention that the more senior union members do get benefits that a new hire doesn't. Initially anyway. Those benefits are, maybe 2, 3, 4, 5 or even 6 weeks vacation and seniority to bid on more desirable jobs that may even pay more.
I have also worked for a union that did pay senior employees up to 10 dollars more an hour, which I can no longer agree with. Most senior employees do have more wisdom but not all. And in a physical job like construction some of the older guys just can't work as hard as they used to. There are still young men out there that can work their butts off. I no longer believe they should be paid less to do more work, in some cases.
Some places have quota's, if a guy with six months can put out just as much product and the quality meets spec then why should he be paid less?
Just relating my experience, not looking for an argument.
 

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I stopped eating that garbage for breakfast decades ago. I might partake of some old fashioned oatmeal once in a while, otherwise, it is real food for me. An omlet with spinach, cheese,onions and ham. maybe some fruit, Heck even pie is a better breakfast.
 

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Dan Osborn, a plant mechanic and president of the local in Omaha, Nebraska, said legacy employees do make good money, and he doesn’t doubt many earn $120,000 or more. But a huge share of that haul comes from overtime racked up working 12- or 16-hour days, often seven days a week.

“Say you got a guy on legacy making $30 an hour. The crude math, at 40 hours a week, that would be $60,000 a year,” he explained. To get to $120,000, “that’s how much overtime people are working.”

Bidelman said his longest personal stretch of consecutive workdays without a break was 116.
 

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Dan Osborn, a plant mechanic and president of the local in Omaha, Nebraska, said legacy employees do make good money, and he doesn’t doubt many earn $120,000 or more. But a huge share of that haul comes from overtime racked up working 12- or 16-hour days, often seven days a week.

“Say you got a guy on legacy making $30 an hour. The crude math, at 40 hours a week, that would be $60,000 a year,” he explained. To get to $120,000, “that’s how much overtime people are working.”

Bidelman said his longest personal stretch of consecutive workdays without a break was 116.
This is what I am seeing where I work at every day. Between not be able to get workers and people being off for covid, some are really racking up the OT. Most is voluntary with a little being mandatory. Its is a non-union shop. Once the covid "wave" passes, I am not sure if it will be much better. There has been a worker shortage here in Meadville for quite some time and it doesn't look like they is much hope on the horizon.
 

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The company could hire on lots of new workers, rather than having fewer people, working 80 hours a week.

If they offered $30 an hour, with decent benefits, they would have huge numbers of applicants.
 

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The company could hire on lots of new workers, rather than having fewer people, working 80 hours a week.

If they offered $30 an hour, with decent benefits, they would have huge numbers of applicants.
Right now I think the starting wages is around $20, plus a lot of benefits and retirement. That's for knowing nothing and all is required is a HS diploma and a drug test. Handling bags, sweeping floors ect. They also will pay for further education to advance within the company so they can move up. To me that's a good wage to start out without brining any skills to the table.
 

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Right now I think the starting wages is around $20, plus a lot of benefits and retirement. That's for knowing nothing and all is required is a HS diploma and a drug test. Handling bags, sweeping floors ect. They also will pay for further education to advance within the company so they can move up. To me that's a good wage to start out without brining any skills to the table.
If that's the case, then it's a very good deal. Where in today's world can one find a company that pays great bennies, offers retirement and a long term commitment and chance for advancement for loyal, conscientious workers. Not many opportunities like that left.
 
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