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I'm building a small cabin - no real carpentry skills but it's coming along nicely. Wondering what to do about running a six inch pipe out the wall for the stove? Looked at thimbles and double wall pipes at Ace. Looks like it would cost me at least $950 - that's way too much. Any suggestions on a cheaper but safe way to go?
 

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I used triple wall for going through the attic and roof. They wanted abut $900 then and that was many years ago. I shopped around and was able to buy everything for about $350.

Make some calls you may find better prices.

I would also look at the local building codes to see what pipe is required. Around here we needed triple wall for places that were enclosed. Anywhere not enclosed we could use single wall.

BTW I would also look online for prices.
 

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Run the pipe inside through the roof. Still need some 2 wall and a roof boot. I did run mine out the side and up was expensive but worth it .
 

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Both my wood stoves are thru the wall. I doubled the crocks,thats what I call them, I put fire stops inside the wall. One of them has been in place for over 30 yrs,all ok.
 

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Both my wood stoves are thru the wall. I doubled the crocks,that's what I call them, I put fire stops inside the wall. One of them has been in place for over 30 yrs,all ok.I used single wall thru the crocks.
 

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If you aren't using an insulated pipe you're asking for trouble. Back in the day double wall was sufficient when my buddy's camp was built. A few years ago we decided to upgrade due to age. When we got up in the attic we found wood that had been charred and some close to the pipe was "alligator skinned". Never again will I use non-insulated pipe in a building I will be sleeping in. It's a lot of money, but when my stove at home is burning flat out I can put my hand on the insulated pipe.
 

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I would doubt that you could even get insurance if not using triple wall pipe.
 

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Don't recall now if the stove pipe at camp is double or triple wall insulated SS, but it was expensive to install back in 1984. Hart & Cooley, don't think they even offer it these days?

Other than the rain cap on top, it looks just as good as it did when installed. It also gathers virtually no creosote on the inside. I knock about two handfuls of crud from the clean out cap on the bottom of the T each fall.

Thru the wall, no place does the pipe come within three inches of any wood framing - and that is where the vertical pipe goes past the wooden face board on the roof eave. Six inches of clearance where it goes out through the wall.

About a foot of the insulated SS pipe comes in thru the wall where the steel stove pipe goes into it.

When the stove is going full-tilt, can lay a hand on that piece of insulated SS pipe coming in thru the wall.
 

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I installed double-wall stainless in '99 after my Herthstone Soapstone stove arrived from Vermont. 1 wall thimble, and I think 18' of sections to chase up the outside of the wall, and through the roof overhang. Oh, and a cap of course. My failing memory is telling me I paid in the $500, maybe $600 range back then, and I purchased it from Lowe's. Lowe's beat the heck out of the local ma & pa hearth and stove type stores, but that makes sense.
 

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There's been way too many fires from people "skimping" on the proper equipment. Do yourself and whoever is sleeping in your place a favor and buy the right stuff.
 

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You could use the triple wall only where you pass through the wall. Use single wall inside the cabin and when you get close to the wall switch over to tripe wall pipe. They sell single to triple wall adapters. Might save you a few bucks.
 

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DO NOT CHEAP OUT ON THE CHIMNEY!

Go look on Amazon! I've got two 36" sections of chimney and a through-the-wall kit on the way....$407 shipped. I'll source the single wall stove pipe locally because it's cheap everywhere and I don't have a stove yet to know exactly what I'll need other than an elbow. Cement board for the floor protector and cement board spaced an inch or more for the wall and it'll be good for any newer EPA stove. It's a camp, not my home...it doesn't have to be the prettiest, it just has to function properly.

I thought of going old-school with just a pipe through a concrete poured thimble, but the safety factor alone is just not worth it. I know money doesn't grow on trees, but it's a whole lot easier to come up with $1000 than it is to bury a loved one!

DO NOT CHEAP OUT ON THE CHIMNEY!
 

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Amen! I've never regretted spending "extra" $$$ on SS insulated chimney pipe at camp. Best part, the cabin is still there.

Second best part, 32 years later it still looks like new, but for the rain cap on top.

We used the old fashioned insulated/metal faced "stove boards" on the wall, with a good inch and a half space between the back of the boards and the wall surface. There's another matching "stove board" under the wood stove.

The wall boards stop about two inches below the ceiling, but that wasn't necessary. Zero heat ever makes it past the boards. When temps are in the teens and twenties, the stove can be going full blast and the wall behind those boards is ice cold.

So, another vote for SS insulated pipes as money well-spent.
 
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