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I'd like to do some winter camping but I'm not sure how to deal with the condensation that builds up in the tent in cold temperatures. Any suggestions?
 

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Gas heaters and body moisture is always a problem. The only trick I know is to leave a window or flap open,. Defeats the whole purpose of heating the tent. Using a wood stove is less problematic but not practical unless its a big tent with vent stack hole
 

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Not sure if your talking about back packing or a bigger tent. I have a two person tent when backpacking. I keep a small section at the top of my front flap un-zippered. Seems to help out a lot.
 

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You would also want to keep a flap or window open slightly to keep carbon monoxide from building up . With a vent or window open , your heat will rise and escape . We used a small tent light with a built in fan . It helped direct the heat back down to the floor for more consistent warmth .
 

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Reminds me of the times I survived cold winter nights camping without any heat. I always carry a emergency blanket in a day pack, that reflects human heat from the body. Saw they have emergency sleeping bags. Anyone camping in cold weather should prepare for no external heat. But that can be better said than done.
Out on walks an hikes this year testing equipment and clothing for nights without heat, even in the house at night with a power failure. In my house I have wood by the fireplace an a small propane heater for occasional heat.
If there is a trick, its only heating the body. Not the whole room where you are. A lot get prepared for cold winter nights, if only they have external heat.
 

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I never noticed condensation as a problem, sometimes you'll get pretty heavy frost around the open edge of your sleeping bag. But I guess my tents breath well. If the snow is deep I'll pile it on the tent to cut down on ventilation. In the night I hang a candle till I go to sleep and I imagine that dries the upper air. A stove or mantle lantern in the morning really warms and takes the cold touch out of things. Going to an all day auction in upstate New York tomorrow so I took the tent up the mountain today for a sleepout Saturday night. Rumor has it that it will be chilly by Sunday morning.



 

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This was some pics from last year. I always try to pick either the coldest night or one with a blizzard as I like waking up with the tent covered in snow. No snow coming down last year but according to the weather station in Montrose it was a -14 night. Went in on snowshoes so that was real nice, snowshoeing is one of my favorite things. Ran my trapline for weeks last year on snowshoes.





 

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This is in the spring on the frozen Beaufort Sea, long nights average about -40 and short days -25. The lantern and that single burner stove kept things cozy warm inside.



Tents are about a foot below the surrounding snow to seal them up. You step down to get into them. Can see the step in the pic above on the left side of the plywood table.

 

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We camp in cold weather with no heat source in tents. Need sleeping bag at least 25 degree rating below what you think it will get down to. Completely change every piece of clothing for dry under ware included. Wear good hat lots of heat leaves thru head at night. good luck
 

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kudu58 said:
Fantastic pics!!! What sleeping bag do you use?
Actually use 2, one inside the other. I've had them for a very long time. Don't remember their rating but one is a Caribou brand (inner), maybe 0 deg but not sure, synthetic fill like quallofil. The other is physically larger (outer), no name, was cheaper, fill is synthetic but weighs heavier, seems like it was like a 20 deg rating. Last night I wore my down parka and laid that across the top of the bags across my legs and honestly from the waist to the tip of my toes it felt like a heated blanket. I never felt chilled and a couple times I was getting hot and took my hat off and stuck my head completely out to cool a little.

troutbert said:
Any tips on gloves that both keep your hands warm and still allow enough dexterity to do the various needed tasks?
I wear polypropylene liner gloves inside insulated gloves or mitts. They are not insulated and fit tightly so allow you to do anything same as no gloves but you can still handle metal without instantly losing heat in the fingers. Used them perfectly in extreme arctic temps this way, just slide the main gloves/mitts off and do what you want. Ironically you asked, the first thing when I got to the tent I realized I forgot the liner gloves, so it was bare hands or heavy gloves last night.

For my head/face I sleep with a balaclava or a rabbit fur bombers hat. The bomber hat is great because it gives great insulation down around the cheeks and the bill can be flipped down to come over the eyes so the only thing exposed is the mouth and nose and they stay warm from breathing. On a night like last night exposed cheeks or forehead I "think" would have got frostbit. My pee bottle froze solid in the tent VERY quickly.

Watched a prerecorded weather forecast on WNEP when I got back this afternoon and scrolling across the bottom it said Montrose was -18.

From last night and this morning:









 

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tundragriz said:
Actually use 2, one inside the other. I've had them for a very long time. Don't remember their rating but one is a Caribou brand (inner), maybe 0 deg but not sure, synthetic fill like quallofil. The other is physically larger (outer), no name, was cheaper, fill is synthetic but weighs heavier, seems like it was like a 20 deg rating.
That does not surprise me. When I went on that grizzly hunt in Alaska, I used the same setup. It was only getting into the 20's on that trip, but I used a smaller, thinner bag that I was inside of and a bigger bag over top of that. I got so warm at night that I was unzipping the outer bag, just laying on my sleeping pad in the smaller bag and using the outer one as a cover with my feet tucked in the bottom.
I just wore under armour tops and bottoms, a pair of hunting socks and an under armour skull cap. My pillow was my hunting jacket. Couldn't believe how warm I stayed.

Makes me wonder how cold you could manage with that setup and really good equipment...
 
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