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I just brought some honey comb home from one of my timber sales. I crushed up the cone, and let it run through a collander, The wife looked at it, and spotted a few pieces of dead bee mixed in with the crushed comb, and declared it unfit for consumption, as the possibility arose for salmonella poisening...since I've never done this before, I'd like some advice from you bee guys out there...Really hate to throw 2 cups of honey away....
 

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Bring it to the Outdoor Show Scott. I'll eat it for you!
 

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We buy home made honey from a fella in Cresson.
Now you got me thinking we are going to get salmonella poisening.
But it is better than the store stuff.
 

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please send a jar. i'll gobble it up too. honey does not spoil and would effectively reduce to nil any chance of little bee parts becoming contaminated with salmonella. I read someplace that honey was used as preservative and embalming fluid or something like that. whatever the case...fresh wild honey is YUMMY.
 

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Honey also reduces cancer risks, and IIRC, reduces the chance of bee allergies?

Of course, they also say bee stings reduce the risk of cancer.
 

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Send it to me I will let you know if it is fit. Don't throw it away, just strain it through some cheese cloth. Tel your wife honey has antiseptic qualities so those bee parts wonnt hurt you. Un parturized honey, uumm.
 

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TimberPro, Don't believe these people it must be checked before u eat it. Please PM me for the address to have it checked. Oh it takes 2 cups to be processed. Tom
 

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I saw a piece on honey on TV last evening form the Farm Show. Very informative and just plane cool. I, unfortunately, am allergic to honey. if I have a spoonfull of honey I will be spending the next 24 hours in the "porcelin reading room"....
 

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the bee parts will not hurt anything. After we spin our honey, it has bee parts and pieces of the wax from the caps. We use fine cheesecloth to strain it. We hang the honey/wax/bee part filled cheesecloth from a ladder and let it drain into a container below
 

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Raw Honey, a tablespoon full a day. My wifes uncle has bees and we get enough to last till the next time he does it. I do know the fall honey is much darker and is what we're eating now. google raw honey and get educated on all the benefits. Timber I would not throw it away, take it to someone to check it first if not sure.
 

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Could make some dynamite meade from that if you've got a gallon's worth. Definitely not gonna be any Salmonella in that!
 

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I found a honey bee tree while bow hunting. A beekeeper friend told me the honey would be full of eggs and not to eat it. His hives have a seperator so the queen cant get to the comb to lay the eggs. Any thoughts as it is still out there?
 

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Honey is very healthy and it has anti-microbial properties that prevents the growth of bacteria and viruses. Bees are very clean animals. Honey bees do not lay eggs in their honey thats the equivalent of covering your kids with bbq sauce.
 

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mgp629 said:
I found a honey bee tree while bow hunting. A beekeeper friend told me the honey would be full of eggs and not to eat it. His hives have a seperator so the queen cant get to the comb to lay the eggs. Any thoughts as it is still out there?
I haven't taken the apiology course that our school offers, but from the entomology that I've studied that makes absolutely no sense. Eggs aren't laid in honey comb, workers take honey from the comb and feed it to larvae in a separate cell.
 

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Many years ago I was going getting ready for a DIY baited bear hunt in Ontario. I stopped at the largest beekeeper in the area and asked if he had any scrap honey. He looked at me kinda funny and said, see that bowl, it was an uncovered cereal size bowl almost full of honey sitting on the window sill of one of his outbuildings, he said it has been sitting there for about 10 years, he brushed off the 1/4" of dust, dipped his finger in uncovering fresh honey and ate it. Said there is no such thing as scrap honey. Bacteria will never grow on it and it never goes bad.

He also informed me that when bear get into his hives they don't touch the honey but rather are after the bee larvae. He has electric wire fence around the hives and said that it didn't work at first as the bear just pushed their way through it, but it did work after hanging bacon on the wire.
 

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Bears are more interested in the brood, but they will also eat the honey comb. Using bacon on bear deterent fences is the recommended way to make them effective. When the ber wraps that foot long toungue around the bacon and the fence he gets a rude introduction to old Ben Franklin's discovery.
 
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