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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
hightine said:
It's a youtube video. But I don't understand the message.
First Nations have gone into this area between Christmas and 31 December 2012 and slaughtered 12 elk consisting of cows and small bulls (raghorns as they are called here). They apparently say the herd bull got away. On another site, the herd bull got away but was wounded. In the process they are bragging about it on You Tube which have a lot of people up set due to the mass slaughter. First Nations are not required to have a license and are supposed to hunt in normal hunting seasons. Some of the First Nations are not honoring the system, hunting up to 12 months of the year and around the clock, using spotlights etc., selling meat and wasting some as well.
For the White Nation (you or I) if we have property in this area, we have to apply for a draw. As of January 2012 that draw system went from a five level to a ten level. Say I applied and my application got accepted, I automatically drop to level ten. Each year whether I apply or not, my level gets bumped up one level. The only way I could possibly get drawn is if there were not enough applications to fill the amount of licenses alotted for that particular area.
On the news this morning, Conservation is supposed to be investigating this as they have had a large amount of complaints since the video was posted on Monday.
Some people are hard to understand due to: language barrier, broken English(not being able to speak or understand another language properly) and accents.
If you view the comments and feed back below the video, you will see some of what is happening. As a note, the newest post is at the top of the page so you would have to scroll to the bottom and select "show more" to get to each previous page until you get to the very start.
It just takes a few bad apples to spoil a box. Some of the First Nations people are very nice and honest.
Hopefully this explanation helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
As an update: These were First nation people (natives) hunting on private land supposedly with the owners permission. In Manitoba this is permitted, but what has to change: First nation and now Metis are allowed to hunt 12 months out of the year. They are allowed to hunt for family members that either do not hunt or unable to hunt, therefore several animals may be harvested as per their treaty. Their season has to be reduced to the standard hunting season length and if the Elk license applications are reduced, there has to be a control put on the number they are allowed to harvest. Both are allowed to hunt on Crown Land (Government Land) whether or not it is occupied, and also on Indian Reservation or private land providing they have permission. Metis have to have permission from the Chief to hunt on the Reservation. Meat is not to be wasted or sold including antlers. First Nations do not require a license. Metis are the result of the offspring of say a native man and white woman or the opposite. Metis have recently been given a similiar right but must possess what is called a "Harvester Card". This card costs $25.00, valid for one year and allows the harvest of: 1 elk, 1 moose, 1 bear, 1 deer and 50 pound of assorted fish. They are given a tag for each animal species that they are permitted to harvest.
In the case of Elk, the report states that Manitoba was allowed 1700 elk tags for the season 2012 which are obtained by a draw system. This does not take into account the amount of animals that First Nations and Metis harvest. A percentage of in this case 1700 tags are alloted to licenced guides.
In my case as a landowner and I apply for a Landowner Elk license if drawn, I can only hunt on my own land. To be eligible a landowner must have a minimum of eighty acres. If accepted, the following year I would drop to level five as was the rule prior to 2012. As of January 2012 this changed to 10 levels. Whatever level I was in previously I would not lose. Whether I applied or not the following year I would be bumped up one level until I got accepted. The only way I could get drawn sooner is if the upper levels did not get filled in the area that was applied for. At level 10, it is possible I could have to wait 10 years before getting drawn and even at the top level does not mean I could get drawn if there were more applications than alloable licenses.
 
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