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Discussion Starter #1
My friend was hunting a parcel of township property that is leased by a local farmer. The farmer gave him permission to hunt the land. This property is within walking distance from his home here in 5D. His neighbor’s wife seen him walking to area with a bow. She sent her husband out to find the “Hunter” and Get him out. The man walks under his tree stand and starts yelling “You can’t F***** hunt here and so on. My buddy says I have permission to hunt and yes I can be here. The guy goes on about how it is township property and the farmer doesn’t own it. My friend said he wouldn’t leave and that he the neighbor said he called the police. So my friend says ok I will wait for the police. 15 minutes pass as they are standing near the road and waiting for police. My friend says well I waited long enough, u were successful in messing my hunt up tonight so you accomplished you goal. When the police come send them across the street to my house, I will be home. 2 hours later the police come and say Just have the farmer give you a note saying you can hunt. So I guess a long way to getting to my question is should my buddy call the Police or WCO next time this guy sets up shop under his stand. Also I have permission to hunt this land for farmer and may have same situation also...
 

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Very important you get the written note signed by the farmer - first.

Second - call your local WCO. Explain to him the situation. I had a similiar situation, there is something called hunter harassament. I would call your local WCO now and get the ball rolling.

Good luck -
 

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This has less to do with trespassing and more to do with hunter interference. The WCO should be called now so he cn tell the individual what he did is unlawful and if he interfers again he will be prosecuted. If he does it again call the WCO again and have charges filed on him. However, if the land owner notifys the guy now he is not welcome on his property if the guy goes back and interfers again he could be charges with both trespassing and hunter interference by the WCO.
 

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Yes I think he should be cited for hunter inter,,, he should have checked on it first before bothering a hunter, instead of messing up a guys hunt, Stick to hunting that property dont let them win !! Get a note! Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter #6
He and I don’t have any intentions of hunting there until we secure the notes. I agree it would be a good idea to give the WCO a heads up he may get a call if any future hunts are interfered with. It is just a big hassle for multiple reasons. 1. We have to get notes now. 2. This guy will be out again to mess up one of our hunts. 3. Have to call WCO or police on him. All the time messing up the hunting area with human activity. Both of our time is precious any free time we get to hunt is hard to come up with. My friend can get out 2 evenings a week at best. Usually one. So basically he has to sacrifice what may be a weeks worth of hunting for when this nut comes back and not to mention last nights waste.
 

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Just call the police. They will be there faster than the WCO and you may actually be able to get some hunting in after they haul him out.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
John S I really like you advice this time. Excellent. I like the idea of letting the WCO talk to the neighbor who objected to the hunting first. This will allow for any future hunts not to be messed up. This may be best approach to have less conflict . Here is the plan of action for my friend. 1. Call WCO and let him know situation 2. Get note 3. Call WCO back and ask if he could explain situation to neighbor to avoid any further conflict.
 

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Tell the WCO when your going to be there maybe they will meet you there just to warn this guy, If you quit now he wins, stick to it to get the point across to this guy so he learns about hunting,laws and regs
 

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John S said:
This has less to do with trespassing and more to do with hunter interference. The WCO should be called now so he cn tell the individual what he did is unlawful and if he interfers again he will be prosecuted. If he does it again call the WCO again and have charges filed on him. However, if the land owner notifys the guy now he is not welcome on his property if the guy goes back and interfers again he could be charges with both trespassing and hunter interference by the WCO.
What he said!
 

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I agree with JohnS. I would call your local WCO and discuss it with him to make sure he's going to back you up. Get the written permission. Then try knocking on the neighbors door and show him the written permission and explain to him that you are not breaking the law but he is. Is he thinks you are hunting on the township land then he should prove it to you without coming out in the woods and messing with you. As hard as it may be try to keep the conversation very polite since you will be standing on his front porch.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
foxhntr9 said:
Tell the WCO when your going to be there maybe they will meet you there just to warn this guy, If you quit now he wins, stick to it to get the point across to this guy so he learns about hunting,laws and regs
My friend got the permission note today from farmer for himself and a guest ( guest being me ). I gave him the number to the DWCO for the area. The guy causing disturbance lives across the street form my friend. He is going to ask the DWCO to come out and explain what the situation is and ask him to go over to neighbors house and explain that no law is being broken by my friend and that it is a violation to interfer with a hunter. This will help prevent any more hunts or area being disturbed. So far all is going well...
 

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if it is public property that the farmer is leaseing...he may not have the right to let any one hunt...depends on how his lease is written..should ck with farmer and are public officials that have jurisdiction over the property...
i ran into the same but the farmer could not give permission to hunt..
 

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ruger, I know John S is good, but I had the same thing happen to me that Rebel is talking about. The farmer had the lease to farm not to give out permission for anything else. Ask him nicely to check his lease.
 

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On the hunter interference call
My inlaws neighbor has a few acres with horses
She runs around during rifle season making noise with pots and pans and hooting and hollaring to deter hunters on her land
I understand completely this is her land and she can do as she wishes
But if I am 30 yrds on his property and she is on hers making all sorts of noise to keep deer away from me is this considered interference
 

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I thought you needed landowner permission, not lessee permission? Kinda like asking someone who rents permission to hunt the owners property. The farmer may have hunting rights within the lease though...if so you are good. If not, I would secure permission from TWP... do you not think the next step for these neighbors is to talk to the township and complain?
 

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The law is below, the necessary component to prove the case is the person must be intentionally interfering with your hunt. It would be a hard sell to the court if her intention is towards people who have no permission to be on her property and inadvertently interfered with you.


1992, Act No. 45-1992.

Sec. 2302. Interference with lawful taking of wildlife or other activities permitted by this title prohibited.

(a) General rule. - Except as otherwise provided in this title, it is unlawful for another person at the location where the activity is taking place to intentionally obstruct or interfere with the lawful taking of wildlife or other activities permitted by this title. (a.1) Activities which violate section. - A person violates this section when he intentionally or knowingly:

(1) drives or disturbs wildlife for the purpose of disrupting the lawful taking of wildlife where another person is engaged in the process of lawfully taking wildlife or other permitted activities;

(2) blocks, impedes or otherwise harasses another person who is engaged in the process of lawfully taking wildlife or other permitted activities;

(3) uses natural or artificial visual, aural, olfactory or physical stimuli to affect wildlife behavior in order to hinder or prevent the lawful taking of wildlife or other permitted activities;

(4) creates or erects barriers with the intent to deny ingress or egress to areas where the lawful taking of wildlife or other permitted activities may occur;

(5) interjects himself into the line of fire;

(6) affects the condition or placement of personal or public property intended for use in the lawful taking of wildlife or other permitted activities in order to impair its usefulness or prevent its use;

(7) enter or remain upon public lands or upon private lands without permission of the owner or their agent, with intent to violate this section; or

(8) fails to obey the order of any officer whose duty it is to enforce any of the laws of this Commonwealth where such officer observes any conduct which violates this section or has reasonable grounds to believe that any person intends to engage in such conduct.

(b) Enforcement and recovery of damages. - The commission or any person who is lawfully engaged in the taking, hunting or trapping of game or wildlife who is directly affected by a violation of this section may bring an action to restrain conduct declared unlawful in this section and to recover damages.

(c) Exceptions. - The conduct declared unlawful in this section does not include any activities arising from lawful activity by other land uses, including farming, mining, forestry practices, recreation or any other activities when it is evident that such activities are not intended to violate this section.
 

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My inlaws neighbor has a few acres with horses
She runs around during rifle season making noise with pots and pans and hooting and hollaring to deter hunters on her land
I understand completely this is her land and she can do as she wishes
But if I am 30 yrds on his property and she is on hers making all sorts of noise to keep deer away from me is this considered interference
Nope. It's considered band practice.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
FrankDegamma said:
I thought you needed landowner permission, not lessee permission? Kinda like asking someone who rents permission to hunt the owners property. The farmer may have hunting rights within the lease though...if so you are good. If not, I would secure permission from TWP... do you not think the next step for these neighbors is to talk to the township and complain?
not sure about the conditions of the lease. I think with the police telling him last night to get a note from the farmer and have it with him there should be no problem. If a visit from the DWCO can squash this then that would be great. By asking the farmer to check his lease you may be getting into the territory where he says this is way too much trouble for me and easier for him just to say forget it, no hunting. When someone is kind enough to allow you to hunt I think it is important to make everything as easy as possible for them.. If it comes to that then I am sure my pal will take the steps needed. As of now here is the timeline of events.
1. neighbor comes and hastles hunter for hunting on leased township property for farming.
2. Hunter gets visit from police and explains he has farmers permission to hunt leased property. Police respond by telling him have written permission and all should be fine
3. Hunter gets written permission from farmer, next step is to get in touch with DWCO to see if a simple talk stating he has permission and it is a violation to disrupt hunt. If neighbor persists after this more steps will be taken if needed.
 

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Will the WCO ask to see permission from the landowner, or the farmer that leases it? IMHO, the landowner.... John S, in this situation...would you be satisfied with permission from the farmer who leases or would you want landowner. I guess the visit from the WCO should straighten it out...report back, i would like to know.
 
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