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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend asked me if I knew anything about this rifle. It was her father's.


The only markings I can find on it is H S with what looks like a circle with flames on the top right below where the front sight was.

 

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Model of 1917 action...maker should be on the front receiver ring under the base for the scope ring, if it wasn't ground off when it was converted to a hunting rifle.

HS is the barrel maker....High Standard.....and it's a replacement for the original.

The receiver will have been made between 1917 and 1918 by Winchester, Remington, or at Eddystone (Remington plant, but the receivers are stamped EDDYSTONE).

Majority of the rifles were made at Eddystone.

I have one in military configuration that is a Winchester.

I have a sporter that was my dad's first deer rifle, and it is a Remington. Both good shooters.

The pics aren't conclusive on this, but the bolt looks to maybe have been straightened/reshaped? The safety is a dead giveaway on the 1917 action, however.

It is POSSIBLE it is a British Pattern 14, which was the father to the US Model of 1917, but it's far more likely to be a US 1917. The rifles look nearly identical. The Brits abandoned the P14 and the US used it to create the 1917. That's the highly abbreviated version, lol.

My strong suspicion, barring better pics, is a US Model of 1917, made by Eddystone, post WW1 or wartime (WW2) rebuild with an HS barrel. Smithed sometime in the 50's or 60's into a hunting rifle.

A real good idea would be to get the receiver checked by a smith for cracks. Eddystone receivers have a bit of a reputation for being cracked during a rebarreling operation, even when done in the government arsenals. The why's/wherefore's of that are a long, long story. Short version- if that was mine, I'd get a smith to give it his blessing and then shoot/hunt the heck out of that rifle. It likely shoots quite well.
 

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Can agree with tdd. I owned and used one on occasion. It was still in military stock. On the heavy side but shot excellent. Mine was also stamped eddystone. That p17 should be an 30.06. The p14 I think was 303 British caliber.
I was told the p17 was fashioned from the p14. Only in 06 cal.
Another rifle I should not have sold.
 

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I'll try to keep this short, lol.

The British developed the Pattern 14 to shoot a 276-caliber round in response to the 7mm Mausers they faced in the Boer War.

When WW1 loomed large, they ditched the new round and had it chambered in 303 British.

The rimmed 303 round takes up some mag space, and the "belly" appeared in the rifle to accomodate the 5 rds that were in a typical charger of ammunition.

The US also let itself get caught very short on rifles for its own involvement in WW1. The contracts with Winchester, Remington, and Eddystone for the British Gov't had run their course, but the companies still had the tooling and such to make the rifles.

The US worked with them to make proper modifications to run the 30-06 round in the rifle. The "belly" stayed, and the result was the magazines in "as issued" 1917's will accommodate 6 rounds of 30-06 ammunition.

The bolt retained the cock on close setup the British always preferred. This was generally despised by the Americans, who's Krags and Springfields all cocked on open.

Of note, the US bailed on its contracts with the arms makers when the war ended, and that effectively stuck the companies with parts and materials they would not be compensated for. One of the results of that was Remington releasing the Model 30 rifle as a hunting rifle. It was a 1917 set up as a hunting rifle, using tooling and parts meant for the military contract that wasn't fully honored by the government.

There was push to standardize the 1917 over the 1903 after the war, but it was unsuccessful.

Estimates claim that 3/4 of the US troops involved in combat used a 1917 rifle. The USMC never issued them...they only would issue the 1903.

As far as nomenclature, the official designation for the rifle was "U.S. Model of 1917". The British rifle was designated by them as the Pattern 14. The British rifles are often referred to in short as "P14's", which is correct. The US rifles get called a variety of things, from P17 (technically incorrect, but widely recognized and known) to M1917 (technically also incorrect) to "Enfields" (the rifle was designed by Enfield).

The actions are insanely strong, and long enough to accommodate H&H length rounds without any work other than to open the bolt face for the bigger magnum case head.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks
I took the scope off and under it said
US
Model of 1917
Winchester
109915
I am having trouble getting the bolt to open. The part in the magazine is coming up to far and stopping the bolt.

 

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If you meant closing the bolt, that is normal. The M1917 doesnt have a mag cut off so the follower blocks the bolt when the magazine is empty. Keeps soldiers from firing empty chambers when in a hurry.

As to worth. In original condition it is a 700.00 + dollar bill. Sportered, its what you want to pay for it. 300 probably wouldnt be out of line if you like her. I would not go any higher than that because IMHO that is a favor, but it depends on how much you want it. Your pics are not great, but it looks like a OK job, but it still a cut mil bbl and a not terribly desirable action that has had parts ground off.
 

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Yep, $300 is about right. I was gonna say $250-$350, depending on specific condition, bore condition, etc.

Good that it's a Winny...reduces the cracked receiver concern a fair amount. It's been rebarreled, but HS barrels are good shooters. Usually VERY good shooters.
 
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