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Far easier to find ammo for the .338 plus I owned one before and liked it's big BOOM.
 

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I voted .338 WM ONLY because I do not own one. I have a 300Wby Mag and a .350 rem Mag so I really do not need a .338. The 300Wby has done and will do anything the .338 will. The 350 is a great round and for deer and black bear within 200yds might be tops. It will handle much larger game if the shots are kept within a reasonable range. It's limiting factor is case capacity for powder when using 250gr bullets and limited factory offerings.

Now, If I didn't own either and had nothing close to either, I would get the .338 because of the better long range potential. Bullet selection is good for factory rounds and it is fairly easy to find in stores.
 

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How on earth could you consider a 350 Remington Magnum as a 200 yard or less cartridge?? Lordy the 350 RM can push a 180 and 200 grain bullet at velocities of 2700-2800 fps+. that is faster than a 30-06 can push those bullets. Is a 30-06 a 200 yard or less cartridge??
It is tough to compare a 350 to a 338 because they are shot in different length actions. The 350 is a short action cartridge and that opens it up to a large amount of lighter carrying rifles with the short action. It's downfall is the lack of good bullet selection. But to call it a 200 yard or less cartridge shows no knowledge what so ever of the cartridge.

Personally I like the 35 caliber cartridges better only because I like to shoot cast bullets.

The 338 has about a 100-200 fps gain over the 350 when shooting a 200 grain bullet. So the 338 has a slight edge, but only slight.

If I had to choose one or the other then my selection would be made on two factors. If I wanted a lightweight mountain rifle I would go with the 350. If I was concerned about bullet choice and ammo selection I would go with the 338. Other than that there is not much difference. But the 200 grain bullet in the 338 does have a better BC for longer range shooting(past 400 yards). But definitely no major difference what so ever at 200 yards. And actually the SD advantage would go to the 350 for shots out to about 300 or so.

I always thought an ultimate factory rife(for me) would be a LH Remingtom Model 7 in 350 Reminton Magnum. The recoil would be stout. But it would be a fantastic rifle for carrying, and mountain hunting. And it would handle the big critters as well. Tom.
 

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But to call it a 200 yard or less cartridge shows no knowledge what so ever of the cartridge.
I have only owned and handloaded for the the .350 for 20 years so I guess I don't know much.
It is my OPINION that for larger than large game like Moose, Grizzly, Elk and big Black bears I would IDEALLY like to keep shots under 200 yds with that cartridge.
Could I hunt antelope with it....yes, but for the same reason I would not use a .243 for Elk, I wouldn't specifically use the .350 for my long range work.
As I stated above, 250gr bullets made for BIG game take up a lot of space in the case and velocity suffers. 200gr TSX's work just as good a 250gr conventional bullets but they are long too and use up space that the powder could be using. Add to those facts a short barrel that robs some velocity and hopefully you can see why I said what did. Out of my Rem. 600 I get @2660fps with the 200gr bullets and a LOT less with 250gr. I can get 3100+ with a 158gr JHP but after 100yds it sheds a LOT of velocity and groundhogs are as big an animal that I would shoot with those.
I could live very comfortably with having a .350 as my only rifle and I am positive I could handle any situation with it whether it is short or long range.
If I had to pick between the two for a western Elk hunt I'd still go with the .338.

Send me some of those 2700-2800fps recipes and let me know what barrel length you are using. What load books say and what the chronograph shows me are usually two different things. I don't have a 26" test barrel.
 

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Sorry, just looked at my load log, @ 2632fps with 200gr bullets. 2421fps with 250gr bullets. 2985fps with 158gr JHP and 3116fps with a 125gr JHP.
All are 5 shot averages.
 

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Annnnnnd,
If you notice I said within 200yds it might be TOPS. Meaning I cannot think of a better round within 200 yards, but never did I say it was limited to 200yards.
 

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I would go 338 as it is a true classic. Accepted worldwide and factory ammo would be available everywhere if one should be on a hunting trip away from home and missing their ammo. I have allot of rifles in many calibers all the way from 17 to 458 and I can't say I ever game the 350 any thought - my 35 is the Whelen- can't say I know that much about the 350 but I guess it has appealed to me enough to even care about it or want to learn more about it which is another reason I would stay with the 338.
 

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The .350 is to the 35 Whelen what the .308 is to the 30-06. They are close in velocity until the heavy bullets weights come into play then the Whelen has about a 100fps advantage.
 

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I would take the 338wm will handle anything around. Still has long range with the lighter bullet weights. Dont have on but if i ever get the chance to go out west for elk i will be getting me one.
 

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mfuff said:
The 350 is a great round and for deer and black bear within 200yds might be tops.
Maybe I just misread what you wrote. Above is your quote. Sounds to me like you are saying it is limited, but I will take your word for it.

And you do not know of a 180 grain load that will do 2700-2800 fps?? Then look in the Nosler manual at 61.0 grains or 4064 with a MZ of 2824 from a 24" barrel.

I mean no disrespect, but it doesn't matter if you have been loading for a 350 RM for 20 years, or 50 years. It definitely is not limited to 200 yards. And it is definitely capable of hitting 2700-28000 fps with 180 grain and possibly 200 grain bullets. Even close with a 22" or a 20" barrel.

You are not the only one who has loaded or shot one. We have one of the Remington 700 Limited Classic rifles in 350 Remington Magnum. Tom.
 

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mfuff said:
I voted .338 WM ONLY because I do not own one. I have a 300Wby Mag and a .350 rem Mag so I really do not need a .338. The 300Wby has done and will do anything the .338 will. The 350 is a great round and for deer and black bear within 200yds might be tops. It will handle much larger game if the shots are kept within a reasonable range. It's limiting factor is case capacity for powder when using 250gr bullets and limited factory offerings.

Now, If I didn't own either and had nothing close to either, I would get the .338 because of the better long range potential. Bullet selection is good for factory rounds and it is fairly easy to find in stores.
I'll second all you said...IMO, it's a very academic comparison. In the real world, with properly constructed bullets matched to the game being hunted, either will kill the same with a properly placed shot...

The .350's ability to handle heavy bullets is hampered by the action length it is commonly found in which demands they be deeply seated...with today's premium bullets one is certainly not undergunned with a 200 gr. .35 caliber bullet..or a 250 gr. bullet started out in the 2300-2400 fps range...

The nod goes to the .338 when long range work is a consideration...
 

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.338 for me. The SD on the .33 cal 250 grain is better than the SD for the .35 cal 250 grain.
 

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I too have a 350 and love it.....for what its made for, I dont think I would shoot over 200 yards but I dont know what the average shot yardage is on moose since I have never hunted them. in a nut shell I wouldnt be afraid to hunt moose with my 350, then again just about anything in north america with my 350. If I have to take a long shot with a rifle im not 100% confident in I simply wont take a shot or try and get closer. For me I guess its about the "hunt" and not the kill.
 

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HOGGHEAD said:
mfuff said:
The 350 is a great round and for deer and black bear within 200yds might be tops.
Maybe I just misread what you wrote. Above is your quote. Sounds to me like you are saying it is limited, but I will take your word for it.

And you do not know of a 180 grain load that will do 2700-2800 fps?? Then look in the Nosler manual at 61.0 grains or 4064 with a MZ of 2824 from a 24" barrel.

I mean no disrespect, but it doesn't matter if you have been loading for a 350 RM for 20 years, or 50 years. It definitely is not limited to 200 yards. And it is definitely capable of hitting 2700-28000 fps with 180 grain and possibly 200 grain bullets. Even close with a 22" or a 20" barrel.

You are not the only one who has loaded or shot one. We have one of the Remington 700 Limited Classic rifles in 350 Remington Magnum. Tom.
I missed the word AND after bear and before within.
The point I made was within 200 yards I think the .350 could be the top deer or bear round going. When I hunted out west I took a 300wby because I felt at extended distances I had a much greater advantage if a long shot was needed. I made that choice by shooting out to 400yds and the .350 is not even close.

I know you can drive a 180 to 2700-2800fps but that is exactly why I would not choose a 180 for long range on big animals. The .35cal 180gr bullet does not have the sectional density that is needed for consistent penetration on Elk or Moose sized game on anything but a broadside shot. The 180 is a decent deer bullet unless some of the bonded core or copper bullets are used, then it jumps up a category. Nosler and most load books use long test barrels and in the real world the published velocity and actual velocity differ. In my case because I have an 18.5" barrel compared to a 24" or 26" test barrel I lose a LOT of velocity. And as WinchesterBob has pointed out, seating depth with longer bullets is limited due to the magazine length of the rifle and having to seat the bullets deeper so they fit in the magazine takes up case capacity. Ideally it is not a long range round.

I am by far NOT an expert concerning the .350, but with the Rifle I have for it , range work I did with it and the velocities I get with the loads I have for that rifle(18.5" bbl) I can make a good case for why I have said what I said.
 

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.338, way easier to find ammo
 

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rflktrman said:
Far easier to find ammo for the .338 plus I owned one before and liked it's big BOOM.
I see this worn out statement whenever a not-so-common cartridge is mentioned and it has absolutely no bearing on anything....I'll bet that within five minutes on this computer I can find all I want of either....As far as finding it at some remote outpost...You don't wait till you go hunting to buy it. You buy it before you go.....Afraid of losing it?...Put a couple boxes in your luggage, a couple in your gun case, send a couple boxes out to the outfitter before you go.....There's really no reason to not have your shells when you need them.
 

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Wise words Ken.

I hunted with an outfitter in Colorado for elk. It was not required but sort of became tradition that guys would leave behind a box or 1/2 box of ammo when they left. He had just about any and every caliber and bullet weight you could think of to get anyone through a hunt.

But you are right. Prepare ahead of time and there will be no issues.
 
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