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Discussion Starter #1
...in weight between the 100 gr. Muzzy Trocar HBX and the 125 gr. version? Is the weight difference in the body of the broadhead, in the blades, or some combination of the two? Would it be possible to retrofit new replacement blades to up the weight of an old 100 gr. head to 125 grains? I have the same questions with the fixed blade Trocar. Anybody know?
 

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Since I have only seen a single option package of replacement blades my guess is in the body but honestly I don't know for sure. I'm also interested in the answer as a fixed blade Trocar user.
 

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The difference is in the ferrule/body of the broadhead. The blades are both .035 in thickness. Now the Trocar HB and HBX are the same replacement blade. The information can be found on Muzzy's website. So you will NOT be able to swap out blades to get more weight. You will need the entire ferrule as it is the difference. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What curverbowruss said about not being able to alter the overall weight with replacement blades is what I have confirmed. Not being able to find the replacement blades in-store makes it difficult. Some emails and phone calls and placement of an order has determined that Muzzy replacement blades (Muzzy part # 308) will fit the Muzzy Trocar Standard 100 gr. head, the Muzzy Trocar Deep Six 100 gr. head, and the Muzzy Trocar Crossbow head in BOTH 100 gr. and 125 gr. At $20 for nine blades, screws and an allen wrench, they're only slightly more economical than buying complete broadheads, especially if one must pay shipping costs with the order since I couldn't find them anywhere in a store or shop. My preliminary testing showed them to fly pretty darn well on my homemade bolts/arrows so, if they perform on game as well as people have reported, I should be happy. Time will tell, and time is running short till the season starts!
 

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I know some broadheads in the past were sold as either 100 or 125 and came with a weight that went behind the head and in front of the shaft insert. I'm sure you could find a brass washer the same diameter or close enough to the diameter of your shaft to up your total weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
For anyone interested in the Muzzy Trocar fixed blade broadhead:

I took a doe this morning with a 125 gr Trocar. It was a 25 yard broadside shot. Point of impact was just a few inches higher than I wanted but still caught both lungs. The deer ran 35 yards and dropped within view. Between the ribs going both in and out and stuck in the ground eight inches deep beyond the deer. I have no complaints with the broadhead performance and won't hesitate to continue using them. I'm certain that the bolt and broadhead are perfectly able to be used again after putting in some replacement blades.
 

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yup same thing with slick tricks, the weight is in the ferrule from 100gr to 125gr....
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well, I did put replacement blades in that Trocar broadhead and the wife took a doe with it, too. It broke a rib on entrance and smashed the humerus bone on exit. That deer, also, ran less than 35 yards and she saw it drop. I found the bolt and it appears to be as true and pristine as the day I made it. I think I'll put a new set of replacement blades in it again and see if we can't get number 3 with it.

I used to think that Muzzy's logo, "Bad to the bone," was a bit trite and mostly just an advertising hook-phrase. But, from what I've seen in two kills with the same broadhead/bolt, it is a pretty good depiction of the Muzzy's performance. Even after breaking a rib and shoulder bone, the blades showed little signs of abuse. A lot must be said, of course, for the fact that shot placement was near perfect with double-lung hits both times, but the bolt and broadhead continue to be undamaged except for the blades. There was no immediately obvious bloodtrail on either deer for the first fifteen or twenty yards. Again, mid-chest shot placement would account for this. When the deer drops within sight in 35 yards, who needs a bloodtrail?
 
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