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The powder in the pan that is. Where does it go when I'm walking around?

Was taught to put powder in the pan once I see a deer for best results but on occasion I will put it in to walk in. Interesting though is that once I get to my spot the powder seems to be missing.

Does it just fall out?
 

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the fit between the frizzen and the pan when it is closed, and where the lock rests against the barrel. both can be corrected by filing for a better fit.
 

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Hey - be careful that your prime is not migrating into the lock mortise. If it is and it accumulates there a spark or a flash in the pan can ignite that powder sitting in the mortise and blow the entire lock off the gun. Bad for gun, fingers and portions of face depending on the amount of powder. Remove that lock and see if you have powder built up in the mortise area.
 

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Agree on what JD said. If it is disappearing between the Lock and Pan, things could get very exciting if enough Powder builds up in the Lock Mortise!!
 

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As blackpowder says, FFFFg priming powder has a way of squeezing through the slightest of spaces. Remove the lock and close the frizzen on the pan, now hold it up to the light. Any light showing between the bottom of the frizzen and the pan indicates high spots which must be filed away until no light shows. The second place for priming powder to escape is between the lock and barrel flat. And, this can be potentially dangerous if not remedied. This escaping powder can build up behind the lock plate and be ignited by a stray spark. The resulting explosion can be quite spectacular!


Removing any space showing between the lock and the barrel flat requires removing mere slivers of wood. You find these high spots of wood by passing the insides of your lock over a candle until the internal surfaces of the lock are covered with candle soot. Replace the lock and tighten it down. Now, remove it. Black smudges indicate the high spots, and these you carefully remove with razor sharp chisels. Continue this process very carefully until your lock snugs up tightly against the side flat of your barrel.

These two tasks will result in priming powder staying put in the pan even when you lean your rifle against a tree. Take your time, and good luck!


You two fellows certainly type a lot faster than I do, but I guess we got the point across!
 

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The most critical fit on a flinter is the frizzen to the pan and the pan and frizzen to the barrel flat. If done correctly, the gun could be twirled like a drum major baton and the powder stays in. Some folks fail to properly align their lock when installing it after cleaning.That can leave a gap between the pan and the barrel flat. on a few guns, over tightening one of the lock screws can hold the lock away from the barrel flat. Other times it is loose manufacturing quality control.
 
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