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Due to the many requests that we've gotten to have a forum for air rifles here it is.

I for one am looking forward to getting educated on these air rifles.

Have fun.
 

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Also looking to get educated. I have owned a Benjamin Titan NP 22cal break barrel for about a year and just recently started to get serious about shooting the gun and trying some accuracy out of it. Have tried several different pellets all with mixed results. Some days accuracy is outstanding, like 5 shots touching at 20 yds,and other days accuracy is very poor. Trying to figure all of this out and get some consistency.

Any help and or advice will be welcomed and appreciated.
 

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I have a Benjamin Titan NP break barrel but in 177 cal and have also experienced mixed results. It should be broke-in by now (about 300 pellets shot). Only thing I can figure is wind. These pellets are very light.

Glad to see this forum, should be fun.
 

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Once you try a PCP (pre-charged pneumatic) there will be no turning back. LOL!

-This is a Kalibrgun Cricket .25 Cal.

Over the years I picked up a few PCP rifles in the following calibers: .177, .22, and .25 caliber. Yes, I was the guy that said he would never buy an expensive pellet rifle. Well, my line of thinking changed the moment I fired my first shot.
If you are looking to try a PCP rifle, a good starting point is a Benjamin Discovery Single shot rifle. They come in .177 and .22 calibers. Being that PCP's need to be pumped up to fill the air reservoir, a high pressure hand pump will also be needed. Once the air chamber is pumped up, the rifle is good for many shots. Another good choice in a repeating rifle is the Benjamin Marauder. These are a magazine feed bolt actions, in calibers .177, .22, and .25 caliber.

If folks are interested in seeing photos of the above rifles let me know and I'll get some taken. If I can answer a few questions any one might have, ask away. These are not the BB guns and pellet rifles we grew up with as kids. The more you shoot them, the sooner you will learn that pellet rifles are typically ammo fussy. So try several different brands of pellets in varying weights. My experience has tended to show that most of my rifles seem to prefer heavier pellet weights. The high velocity, light weight alloy pellets have been marginal at best. So don't be afraid to try several brands and weights.

HuntnCarve
Dave
 

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I just ordered a Umarex Torq. Its a springer. After doing some internet research, it seemed like the best bang for the buck. It was only $100 at Walmart.com. It probably will need a better scope. I also ordered a variety pack of pellets to try. I got it as a starter air rifle, if I find I like to hunt squirrels with the air rifle I might move up to something more high end. I always like getting new toys. Now that air rifles are legal it was a good excuse.
 

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Maybe I'm asking too much from my titan. I have been shootin at 20-30yds. If I move in to 10-15yds everything is right there in a small clover leaf cluster.

If I am going to hunt squirrel ,I think I need at least 1" group at 30yds. 30yd groups now sometimes exceed 1 1/2 in.

I guess I'm used to 22 rimfires that shoot 3/4 at 50yd.

What do you guys expect from your air rifles?
 

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Jeepingman, make sure the scope you pick is designed for Spring powered pellet rifles. The 2-way recoil of the spring will eat up many scopes that would work on a powder burner rifle. Something to keep in mind.
crappie-hunter, just depends on the air rifle? The high end rifles are phenomenally accurate and should mirror the powder burners at the range you mentioned. The Cricket pictured above will shoot into the same hole shot after shot at 25 yards. Here's a three shot group at 25 yards with the rifle resting on the porch rail. The dots are 1/2" and the pellets .25 caliber for perspective.

 

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The high end rifles are phenomenally accurate and should mirror the powder burners at the range you mentioned. The Cricket pictured above will shoot into the same hole shot after shot at 25 yards.
The thing, though, is that your Cricket cost around $1500, right? That's more of an investment than I know I'd care to make in an air rifle, just in order to get decent precision.

The $300-400 price point seems to be more reasonable (for my wallet). Even so, when you add the costs of a decent scope, and the equipment for recharging... you're not talking about something that's any cheaper for hunting.
 

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I started out with the Benjamin Marauder (.22 Cal Wood Stock -Center photo). It was around $650 with scope, rings, and pump.
I then bought a .25 cal. Marauder (top ). It's around $480 for the rifle alone. With a pump, scope, and rings it is selling for around $750 in a packaged bundle.

The last rifle I bought was the Benjamin Discovery (bottom photo). Mine is in .177 cal. This rifle with scope, rings and pump, sells for about $550

The Marauders have a shrouded barrel. So they are very quiet and back yard friendly. The Discovery is not shrouded and is very loud. It cracks about the same as a .22 short.

The accuracy of any of them is excellent. Not on par with the much more expensive Cricket. But very darn near. Once you own a high pressure air pump, you can use it for any of the rifles. You do not have to buy a pump for each rifle. I would highly recommend buying a "Hill" brand high pressure hand pump verses the Benjamin high pressure pump. You pay once, and cry once for quality.
 

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I started out with the Benjamin Marauder (.22 Cal Wood Stock -Center photo). It was around $650 with scope, rings, and pump.
I then bought a .25 cal. Marauder (top ). It's around $480 for the rifle alone. With a pump, scope, and rings it is selling for around $750 in a packaged bundle.

The last rifle I bought was the Benjamin Discovery (bottom photo). Mine is in .177 cal. This rifle with scope, rings and pump, sells for about $550

The Marauders have a shrouded barrel. So they are very quiet and back yard friendly. The Discovery is not shrouded and is very loud. It cracks about the same as a .22 short.

The accuracy of any of them is excellent. Not on par with the much more expensive Cricket. But very darn near. Once you own a high pressure air pump, you can use it for any of the rifles. You do not have to buy a pump for each rifle. I would highly recommend buying a "Hill" brand high pressure hand pump verses the Benjamin high pressure pump. You pay once, and cry once for quality.
Yikes, nice rifles,but being on a fixed income puts toys like this out of range. I'll have to be content with a $130 break barrel.

Impressive toys for sure, thanks for sharing.
 

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The thing, though, is that your Cricket cost around $1500, right? That's more of an investment than I know I'd care to make in an air rifle, just in order to get decent precision.

The $300-400 price point seems to be more reasonable (for my wallet). Even so, when you add the costs of a decent scope, and the equipment for recharging... you're not talking about something that's any cheaper for hunting.
I don't think the idea of adding air rifles to hunting was to make it cheaper. I will say this though, in the price range you are mentioning one of the best buys is a RWS 34 in .22 and the scope they come with will keep most new air gun shooters happy for a while.
 

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Maybe I'm asking too much from my titan. I have been shootin at 20-30yds. If I move in to 10-15yds everything is right there in a small clover leaf cluster.

If I am going to hunt squirrel ,I think I need at least 1" group at 30yds. 30yd groups now sometimes exceed 1 1/2 in.

I guess I'm used to 22 rimfires that shoot 3/4 at 50yd.

What do you guys expect from your air rifles?
Crappie, there are many variables with a break barrel and I'll assume you've checked them out but I'll list them anyway.
1. Be sure your stock screws are tight. I tend to replace mine with socket head cap screws and I torque them with my FAT wrench.
2. Be sure you firmly return the barrel back in to locked battery. Be sure the barrel hinge bolt is tight and there is no side to side play on the barrel.
3. Make sure your scope is not moving, rings are staying put etc.
4. Hold the rifle the same way every time. I'm not a big supporter of the "artillery hold" but I am a big supporter of the same hold every time.

That all being said I owned a Titan GP for a few years up until August of this year. It wasn't my most powerful .22 air rifle but it was accurate. Saying that you have checked all the above things I mentioned and your rifle is on good operational order I'll add this.

Pellets, they can make or break a good shooting gun. In my Titan it liked the Crosman Destroyers more than any other Crosman pellet BUT it LOVED RWS Superdomes. 3-5 shots at 25 yards would leave one ragged hole. Also it didn't care for heavier pellets. The 18gr H&N Crow Magnums that shoot very well out of my NP XL1100 would tumble at 25 yards. Also at 100ft most every pellet would start to tumble with the Titan.

You can order RWS Superdomes on WalMart.com and have them in a couple days. I just remembered that I believe mine also liked the Crosman Piranha pellets which are available off the shelf in most WalMarts but the RWS shoots hands down better, at least in my rifle.
 

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I don't think the idea of adding air rifles to hunting was to make it cheaper.
True... spending hundreds on an air rifle just 'feels' wrong, though, you know? (Maybe I've got a prejudice from playing with 'toys' when I was a teen?)

In my price range, and given that my considerations are:
* 'beginner' air rifle for hunting squirrels / groundhogs
* looking for a quiet gun,

what would you suggest?
 

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Perhaps someone can educate me more on these. Right now, honestly, I just don't really see the point. Seems like you're pretty limited to squirrel or the occasional groundhog at very close range. The prices some have quoted on here are impressive to say the least. What advantage is gained from using an air rifle? If you just want to play with something different that's fine, I understand. I'm a bit concerned that many people seem to be stating that they're more "neighborhood friendly" or something to that effect, but the safety zone for hunting is no different than a rifle correct? I'm not trying to be judgmental or a jerk, I just feel like I'm not seeing the attraction.
 

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In my price range, and given that my considerations are:
* 'beginner' air rifle for hunting squirrels / groundhogs
* looking for a quiet gun,

what would you suggest?
I would suggest a .22 caliber Hatsan Model 95 spring or Vortex (gas ram) QE air rifle. QE= quiet energy.
 

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Perhaps someone can educate me more on these. Right now, honestly, I just don't really see the point. Seems like you're pretty limited to squirrel or the occasional groundhog at very close range. The prices some have quoted on here are impressive to say the least. What advantage is gained from using an air rifle? If you just want to play with something different that's fine, I understand. I'm a bit concerned that many people seem to be stating that they're more "neighborhood friendly" or something to that effect, but the safety zone for hunting is no different than a rifle correct? I'm not trying to be judgmental or a jerk, I just feel like I'm not seeing the attraction.
You can kill a deer with a .458 Winchester Magnum or a .223 Remington. You can kill a deer with a modern high tech compound bow or an old recurve or even long bow. You can kill a deer with a 12 gauge slug gun or old timey smooth bore and "pumpkin balls".

Here is the point, options. I've been shooting air power for decades.

I've been hunting squirrels and small game with single projectiles for over 35 years and I've always worried that a 40 grain pill that didn't get stopped by anything could re-enter to ground level with enough energy just coasting could kill or serious injure someone. To many archers are in trees during squirrel season and in the last 15 years the level of camo can be so effective I would never see the hunter. For me hunting with air power gives me some peace of mind. Plus whether I am shooting air or quiet sub sonic rim fire rifles it never sounds like a war zone right where I am.

Hunting with air power is not for everyone just as hunting with a flintlock is not for everyone but no one seems to question that. Some days I question myself taking out a 10 pound air rifle but as soon as I start taking shots in the woods I smile.
 
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