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I've been looking at quite a few old hunting pictures, like in the 1920's-30's and noticed a lot of the guys wore ties while hunting. Any reason for this or has anyone else noticed this
 

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I wear a neck tie every once in a while when I'm hunting. It's always when I sneak a quick sit in during my lunch break though! Even had to make sure it's been tucked in to my outer layers a time or two to assure no blood got on it during field dressing responsibiities.

As far as your orginal question, I have no idea. Could it go back to traditions in England where "formal" hunts were a pasttime for the upper class?
 

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well im not sure but my father told me about a time long ago when people wouldnt by tags and just go hunt when they wished. possibly this is in those times and they where just going to kill dinner after work. to be honest i have no idea. im more a fan of camo and blaze orange
 

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I was always told that those were the hunters travelling clothes to & from camp. The photos you always seen were those by the meat pole prior to departure and heading for home. I don't think they actually hunted in ties?
 

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Very interesting, I've seen possibly hundreds of these photos and never picked up on it.
 

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Edwardian clothing was popular for gaming gentlemen until the depression; especially upland hunting. Look at the first woolrichies; they were knickers to be worn with wellington's!
 

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Well, guys used to wear "field scarfs" while killing Germans in WWI. I suppose though, that its related to fassion or what is expected. I remember when men used to wear a suit of sports coat and women wore white gloves when traveling by air. Ya', I'am that old.
 

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It was the custom for all but lowly workmen laborers to wear ties for everything in the 1890's to about 1930 and then the fashion started to die out. It was still the custom at alot of colleges and universities into the 1960's. In a few families, even into the 1960's and 1970's, the men and boys were expected to wear ties to eat supper with the family. There are still some3 holdovers to that. My uncle told stories about an Italian immigrant he worked with on a roofing crew. The guy wore a white shirt and tie to work everyday, put coveralls over it regardless of the heat and worked in the heat on the roof all day, then took the coveralls off to go home. I remember gas station attendants wearing ties as part of their uniforms in the early 1960's. Of course then they pumped the gas, checked the oil and washed the windows with every purchase.
 

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There is a terrible upland hunting author who still wears ties when he hunts game birds. I think it is pretentious to do that but some folks still do it.
 

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I just might start wearing a tie this fall to hunt small game. What the heck, why not? Wonder if it should be blaze orange or one of them painted ties my wife got me for my birthday about 100 years ago?
 

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No it is not pretentious, people use to have manners and treated hunting and wildlife with respect. It was the custom of the time and even the poor wore ties to hunt and it is still done in Europe by all classes. Maybe we should bring it back.
 

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I'll stick with my blaze orange tee shirt if I can get away with it. Although it would be hoot to go to a game farm for a traditional English hunt complete with the requisite snazzy outfits, once.
 

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People don't even wear ties to church anymore, I doubt you could bring back wearing ties to hunt lol.
 

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Let's see, a white shirt and tie, tweed knickers and knee high laced boots, hunting jacket with shoulder recoil pad. Houndsmen, beaters, old double barrel guns, tea and scones whilst cook prepares the pheasant. Sounds like a proper hunt. Typical day for Prince Charles.
 

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You're right, bunnbuster, about the church thing. As a kid I had to wear a tie and blazer or a suit to church every Sunday. Not just Christmas but every week my parents made me dress up. This was in the 80s though and not everyone was doing it. Today, it seems like hardly anyone dresses up to go to church. So much for calling it your "Sunday best." People today even wear shorts and t-shirts to go to court. Things have sure changed just in the last 30 years.
John, I don't think the folks in the old pics were pretentious as that was the norm of the time. But today the guy who is out there hunting grouse or woodcock with his Ehlew pointer or DeCoverly setter wearing a tie is pretentious. Just my opinion. The kind of guy who subscribes to Cigar Aficionado.

BTW, I am not insulting the dogs - they are supposed to be good dogs. I do find it annoying the guys who have to bring up a dog's geneology at every possible opportunity.

If you read the guy's book you know who I am talking about. He may even be a member of this site.
 

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Brings back some old memories, as I remember the 1950's. If you were born after 1960, you won't recall the frequent use of neck ties. I wore a tie and suit to high school in the 1950's. Golfers wore ties in the 1920's and 1930's. Worked as a movie extra(spectator and golf official), for a golf movie of that time and wore knickers(pants to the knees) long socks, neck tie, sports coat and peaked hat. Felt I was in that era after a day.

Army soldiers in WWII wore ties in combat. General Patton fined soldiers if he caught them not wearing their helmet or their tie.

Remember an old American League manager who wore a suit and tie in the dugout. Connie Mack of the Philadelphia Athletics. Saw him in person, when around the age of eight.

Bus drivers, truck drivers, service station workers and many workers wore bow ties or regular ties to work. It was a status symbol showing that they weren't perhaps "ditch diggers."

This week I saw a picture of workers at a Cotton Mills annual barbecue in Georgia, some 75 years ago. Most of the workers were wearing dress shirts, neck ties, and long aprons.

In fact I remember an "old timer" took me to a Chicago bar and restaurant in the mid 1960's. The bartenders wore ties and had the same long white apron. Women were not allowed on the premise. The older fellow company employee pointed out the nearby garage, where the St. Valentine's Day Massacre happened.

And then I remember wearing a black bowtie, working as a waiter at a Pennsylvania hotel.

Ties were once very common.
 

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Hey! I still wear knickers to golf!

Zim.

When you setting up the funny clothes hunt for us then. I'm in.
 

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Zimmer, those oldtimers didn't wear knickers and tweeds for the most part, not the common guy. They wore thread bare pants and coats and some vests and an old fedora and a tie, even the poorest of men. Why? Because it was considered good manners. Back then men didn't wear their hats in a house and certainly not when they sat down to eat at their table or in a resturant. People tried to have manners back then, and it was a nicer time and people treated each other better. Perhaps we should go back to the custom. The custom had nothing to do with wealth, it was the custom of the times.
 

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I'm a firm believer in, you act the way you dress. Never saw a fight at a dance, when white shirt, tie and coat were required.

In 1961 I hitch hiked a ride from Elizabeth, N.J. to route 309 alone, now you can't even trust your neighbor, with giving your child a ride to school.

John, I see there are more old timer around here than you and I.
 
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