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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been reading about Lehigh Valley Lube this morning about how well it keeps the gun clean and supposedly stops rust. Then the thought came to be how would WD-40 work for a patch lube? It seems like it might soften up the fowling build up if it was soaked right before it was shot the same way a spit patch soaked in your mouth can soften up the fowling. Then an added plus with the WD-40 would be that it would be ant-corrosive.

Just a thought I had. Anyone ever try it? I'm thinking I might give it a try tomorrow.
 

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Any petroleum based lubricant, which I believe WD-40 is, has the potential to harden like concrete when fired. It will form a shellac and is very difficult to remove. A good friend had lubed his smokepole with some sort of gun oil and it had to be sent back to the factory to be fixed correctly.

Its o.k. to swab your bore with it for storage as long as you run a dry patch through before firing. I'm sure some of the more seasoned Black Powder guys can chime in on this, but I'd avoid using it as a patch lube!!
 

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Several years ago, I was a "true believer" in the amazing qualities of WD-40, and used it liberally on my flintlocks. I would remove my locks, scrub with soap and water, hold under very hot water, dry with a paper towel, and then saturate with WD-40. After the rest of the gun received its proper attention, I would dab off the excess WD-40, and re-install the lock with the smug knowledge that I was treating my long guns as well as the more seasoned black powder folks were doing with their guns, or so I thought!


What I found after an extended period of WD-40 use was, it seemed to slow down the action of my locks because of a film of dried "stuff" on the locks' working parts.

I am now a firm believer in Ballistol, and use it exclusively with my long guns; locks, barrels, and wood. I find it to be a quality patch lube as well. But, this is simply the opinion of a "seasoned" black powder shooter, not necessarily one possessing any knowledge, what-so-ever!
 

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Forget the high tech parch lube stuff and this includes all manner of concoctions we hear about with bear snot, denatured mink oil, worm pee or honeybee puke mixed with hornets nest. Use CRISCO; it's cheap, works great and you can fry stuff in it too.
And what BerksCoflinter said Balistol -- x 2. Balistol and duct tape = an unbeatable combination.
 

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WD-40 "will work" but there is others that are better.(Olive Oil,Crisco,etc)I will be playing with Bear Oil here in the near future.
 

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What we need here, is for you successful bear hunters to share some of that excess fat with us older, non-bear hunting long gunners!
 

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WD-40 is really a poor lubricant.It stands for Water Displacement.It,s super for that,but for lasting lubricating,it,s worthless.It will dissolve and dissapate to nothing in a very short time.It has no lasting residual lubricating quality what so ever.
 

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BerksCoflinter said:
Several years ago, I was a "true believer" in the amazing qualities of WD-40, and used it liberally on my flintlocks. I would remove my locks, scrub with soap and water, hold under very hot water, dry with a paper towel, and then saturate with WD-40. After the rest of the gun received its proper attention, I would dab off the excess WD-40, and re-install the lock with the smug knowledge that I was treating my long guns as well as the more seasoned black powder folks were doing with their guns, or so I thought!


What I found after an extended period of WD-40 use was, it seemed to slow down the action of my locks because of a film of dried "stuff" on the locks' working parts.

I am now a firm believer in Ballistol, and use it exclusively with my long guns; locks, barrels, and wood. I find it to be a quality patch lube as well. But, this is simply the opinion of a "seasoned" black powder shooter, not necessarily one possessing any knowledge, what-so-ever!
I'll take your word for it!
 

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I got mine the easy way.......butcher shop.
Still waiting for solids to settle the whole way.Out of 4 gal. of rendered oil I have about 2 qts of clear oil.
 

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I clean my locks with hot soapy water and an old tooth brush. Afterwards I spray em down with WD-40.Then, I crank up my air compressor and give them a good airing. This is followed by a Ballistol spraying. Ready for storage. I scrounged up some Bear fat a couple of years ago and use it for my Winter patch grease. That stuff sure is greasy!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
BONZy said:
Any petroleum based lubricant, which I believe WD-40 is, has the potential to harden like concrete when fired. It will form a shellac and is very difficult to remove. A good friend had lubed his smokepole with some sort of gun oil and it had to be sent back to the factory to be fixed correctly.

Its o.k. to swab your bore with it for storage as long as you run a dry patch through before firing. I'm sure some of the more seasoned Black Powder guys can chime in on this, but I'd avoid using it as a patch lube!!
Good thing I asked before trying it. I use either crisco or spit right now. The crisco works well, but the when I soak a patch in my mouth the fowling almost goes away. However, I shy away from putting things in my mouth that I store in an old USED tackle box. Thanks for the input guys.
 

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Keep in mind that WD-40 also is a rust inhibitor. Bluing is rust. WD-40 will take bluing off your guns.
 

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the problem with spit is that it can freeze in cold weather. I know some guys who use a plumbing lubricant that is used in refridgeration systems.

I have always just used the regular bottle of patch lube sold in stores, and it worked fine. I no longer shoot RB's.
 

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has anyone used lard to lube their patches? I have some from when I butchered about a month ago and am thinking if I mix it with bees wax it would work well
 

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Lard is good as long as NO salt is in it.If you want to make sure,put lard in a large kettle with about 3" of water in it.Bring to a boil and stir.Let cool and lard will come to top.The water will draw off any blood or salts.Do this about 2-3 times.
 
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