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we had issues with the cold water smelling, and finally had to have a greensand filter installed which cleared up the smell. Total cost was about $1000, but worth it to not hear the women complain.
 

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My parents and I are near Ulysess, our well is 400 feet deep . the water is clear ,does not smell , drinkable , and cold enough to drink right out of the spigot. No issues from day 1. That was since 2001 . A guy from down near state collage drilled it . He had a deal with our builder . once he had so many wells lined up, he would come up and drill them. I believe it ran around $3000 dollars.
 

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Met Vern Cizek(?) of Germania Drilling a few times, years ago. Quite the character in his day.

Referenced a buddy earlier, who built a new camp in Potter some years back and having a hard time getting water.

Eichelberger's put together a crew in Potter and started competing with Germania about the time my buddy was building his camp, late 80s I think. They had drilled a few wells for him here in Cumberland County for houses that he built, so he hired them to drill his well up there.

They were located in what later became County Line Enterprises building supplies on Rt. 6, which closed up several years ago. IIRC, Eichelbergers lasted several years up there and finally gave up. They still operate around here at home.

Most of the local drillers up there all used cable rigs (I called them pounders), due to the gravel sub soils in many areas. They tend to compact the gravel as they pound their way down to the aquifier, unlike rotary rigs like Eichlebergers used. Often rotaries tended to keep caving in and they'd have to start over again, plus needed more well casing.

That's what happened at my bud's place. They finally got a cable rig, lost the "bit" and couldn't retrieve it, so started another hole that eventually produced water.

Our well at camp was pounded in by a local driller from Westfield, Rudy McGlaughlan, back around 1980. Last I knew, his son still drills wells.
 

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Met Vern Cizek(?) of Germania Drilling a few times, years ago. Quite the character in his day.

Referenced a buddy earlier, who built a new camp in Potter some years back and having a hard time getting water.

Eichelberger's put together a crew in Potter and started competing with Germania about the time my buddy was building his camp, late 80s I think. They had drilled a few wells for him here in Cumberland County for houses that he built, so he hired them to drill his well up there.

They were located in what later became County Line Enterprises building supplies on Rt. 6, which closed up several years ago. IIRC, Eichelbergers lasted several years up there and finally gave up. They still operate around here at home.

Most of the local drillers up there all used cable rigs (I called them pounders), due to the gravel sub soils in many areas. They tend to compact the gravel as they pound their way down to the aquifier, unlike rotary rigs like Eichlebergers used. Often rotaries tended to keep caving in and they'd have to start over again, plus needed more well casing.

That's what happened at my bud's place. They finally got a cable rig, lost the "bit" and couldn't retrieve it, so started another hole that eventually produced water.

Our well at camp was pounded in by a local driller from Westfield, Rudy McGlaughlan, back around 1980. Last I knew, his son still drills wells.
Yep-- Mike McGlaughlan is the one who drilled my well in northern Potter- we hit water at 390 feet, went to 450 for a reserve. Mike is great to deal with and very accurate in his estimate. I would recommend him!
 

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Back in the 70s my uncle had Rudy drill a well over at their dairy farm across the hollow from where my camp is now.

Unc needed more water when he went to a bulk milk tank, so had a well punched in down by the milk house.

IIRC, that well is almost 500' deep and produced a pretty good flow of water? Know they put a 1HP submersible pump and an 80 gallon pressure tank in for it, had plenty of water for cleaning milking equipment and that bulk tank.

That farm got its water since the late 1800s, from a spring that operated a hydraulic ram down in a pasture, which pumped water uphill to the house and barn. Ram still worked, but couldn't produce enough water for his needs, with the new equipment in the milk house.

It barely kept up with 60 cows in the barn using drinking buckets, during winters. Unc put in a 100 gallon storage tank up next to the ceiling, that fed those buckets via gravity. did away with that, after the new well went in.
 
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