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So with us going through the dog days of summer and praying for rain, I have been thinking...First of all.. at what water temp do you consider to be perfect for trout fishing. Also what do you consider to be to hot?
 

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Provided the stream hasn't been previously fished or have some other issue like bright sunshine, I think an excellent water temperature is between 57 and 60 degrees. I generally don't fish water over 68 degrees. In fact, if I see a 68 degree water temperature, I head to another stream or section of stream that I'm sure will be cooler.
Most of what has been written on warm water temperatures says that anything over 70 is <span style="text-decoration: underline">too warm</span>. I've also read that trout start to show signs of stress at 68 degrees, which is why I go elsewhere when I encounter that water temperature.

Warmer water has less dissolved oxygen <span style="text-decoration: underline">than</span> colder water. Trout, particularly <span style="text-decoration: underline">browns</span>, can stand warmer water if it has more oxygen, so if they can't locate a spring, or deeper cooler water, will go to a riffle or run.

Sometimes in very low water, trout will gather where a cold water tributary enters. This is a sign of stress and the trout should be left alone.
 

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I was amazed at the number of people fishing kettle creek last night, so I took a look at the stream flow gauge to get a temperature. As of 6:15 this morning, kettle is 72.5. Give the fish a rest people.
 

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In the 'Dog Days' I prefer water temps in the 63-66 range for Browns and Rainbows. 60-65 for bookies. Any colder than 60 this time of year and my action starts to drop the colder it gets. Not that it gets poor, just that those ranges offer me my best action. As for where I stop fishing at, usually I let the trout tell me. They're pretty good at saying what the appropriate stream temp to stop catching them is. Pretty much cause you stop catching them lol. There are more factors than just water temp that go into my decision. Gradient being the second biggest factor. A steep turbulent stream will have far more O2 in it then a slower moving stream. Trout will act 'normal' there at a higher temp typically. Most streams I find that trout activity starts to decrease dramatically at 69 but I have a stream where I routinely fish it up to about 71 before the action peters out and I don't feel bad about it. The trout are very active and normal until my thermometer reads 72. The second it does I know before the therm even hits the water as the trout just hunker down and stop hitting. They are the best indicator to me.
 

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I've read where it has been pretty much scientifically documented that a trout's metabolism runs at its peak in WT's around 57 to 61-degrees. Whether it is a couple degrees cooler or warmer doesn't seem to matter from a fishing point of view.

My personal stopping point would be 70-degrees, though I try to avoid streams where I think the WT would be near 70.
 

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With the lack of rain as of late, I have stopped trout fishing until that changes . Temps are running too high, and flows way too low to stress the trout any further. I just leave them alone.!!
My " cutoff" is around 67 degrees.
 
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