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Discussion Starter #1
CNBC just aired Remington Under Fire on television. There has been a problem with their trigger assembly from day 1 starting in 1948 and still a problem now. Here is the article: http://www.cnbc.com/id/39743024. The gun can fire when switching from safe to fire.

Please be aware that this affects the Remington 700 series. Unfortunately, I have one. Be safe fellow HPA'ers.
 

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Gunking them with WD40 is what mostly causes this. It is rare. Take the cast iron ring off the bolt of a Savage, it is held on by one tiny ball bearing.
 

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http://www.cnbc.com/id/39759366 Here is another article. Watch the program. It is on CNBC right now. Wait until you hear the creator of that trigger assembly. It would've cost 5.5 cents/gun to fix, but Remington didn't want to spend that extra money. Makes me sick that all of my guns are Remington.
 

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Actually had this happen 2years ago on the bench with my son's model 700. I moved the saftey to fire and the rifle went off!!! Scared the heck out of us and I initially felt like I must had done something wrong like having my finger in the trigger. Further investigation on my part found that I could replicate the problem (empty chamber)by lightly touching the trigger and then removing your finger prior to moving the safety to fire and the hammer would fall, so to speak! I contacted Big Green and they sent me a free shipping box to send it out to them, which I did. I got the rifle back in a few weeks with a findings report which summed it up saying that the trigger mech had a "rusty" spring??? Was it? I know we clean our rifles well, but rarely go into the trigger assembly.
 

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I just caught the end of the program and it's a little bit of a catch 22. We would like some government regulation on firearms like in this instance where they could of forced Remington to make the recall. but on the other side we definitely wouldn't want the gov sticking they're political heads into the gun manufacturers and telling them what to do. I feel bad for the families who this has affected adversely. and i feel something does need to be done because alot of anti-gun people who seen this report are gonna be on this like a hobo on a bologna sandwich.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If it clears up today, I am going to be shooting 7 of my Remington guns to see if they will go off. I'm not going to let the nephew use that .243 this year for sure. Replacing all of these firing mechanisms is going to get quite expensive for me, I hope there is a recall.

How about Cabelas? Boy are they going to get a hail storm of calls today.
 

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A few years ago I read that Remington recalled most of the model 700 for a problem with the safety. I sent mine to them and they corrected it. I cant remember what the specific problem was however - maybe this is just a continuation of that situation.

Timber
 

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LMAO! I just clicked on that website. Their response was to call them a liar and offer no counter-argument? Are you freakin kidding me?

I am going to list 7 Remington 700 series guns for sale today. .223, .243, .270, (2) .30-06, and a 7mm
 

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I've seen some 700 actions that had to be in the "fire" position to unload the gun. My 700s are not that way. Is this only a problem with the actions that have to be on "fire" to unload.
My step-dad has one in .22-250 and I always felt uncomfortable around that gun because it goes against everything you learned about handling a loaded gun.
 

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Yep, I wouldn't like that one bit. There is only one reason you should ever take the safety off with a loaded gun, and that's to let her bark. Makes me nervous just thinking about it.
 

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After viewing the response on the site above, I am left with a question.

Those that have had a malfunction, did a gunsmith repair it, or was it sent back to Remington for repair? Was the repair easy, or free?
 

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I have two M700 rifles that lock the bolt when safe. The 'recall' was over the possibility of an AD when pushing the safety to the fire position in order to open the bolt. I seem to recall that alot of the guns that did go off had adjusted triggers.

I've been using my 30-06 over 30 years and my fathers .270 which I now use is a few years older. Both are still in factory adjustment as far as the trigger is concerned and neither has ever had a problem.

Basic safe gun handling includes muzzle control while unloading. There are alot of people who never had them converted because they never had any problem.

Rem did convert the ones sent to them to safety that allows the bolt to open when in the safe position...

Does anyone remember the question from Hunter Ed about always 'trusting' any gun safety?
 

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with the help of the above posts I now remember why Remington recalled my Rem 700 BDL 30-06. You had to put the safety in the Fire position inorder to cycle the bolt. For years I thought that it was odd that I had to do that. I sent the gun back to them free of charge and they repaired it and sent it back.

timber
 

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I haven't seen the CNBC program, but I remember other highly publicized anti-gun programming to know that these are often hit-pieces. Without seeing the program, I can't say, but it makes me suspicious.

By the way, here's the text of Remington's response, copied and pasted from the above link to their website:

Remington Arms
Official Statement for CNBC Program Regarding the Model 700

Submitted September 7, 2010

"For nearly fifty years, the Remington Model 700 rifle has been the preferred choice for millions of hunters, shooting sports enthusiasts and military and law enforcement personnel.

Despite emotional reporting of baseless and unproven allegations and plaintiff lawyer assertions, several undisputed facts remain:

• The Model 700 is the most popular, reliable, accurate and trusted bolt-action rifle in the world, with over five million rifles produced and billions of rounds fired over nearly five decades.

• The Model 700 is the firearm of choice for elite shooters from America's military and law enforcement communities, and has been the platform for the United States Marine Corps and the U.S. Army precision sniper weapon systems for over two decades, both of which specifically require the "Walker" trigger mechanism.

• The Model 700, including its trigger mechanism, has been free of any defect since it was first produced and, despite any careless reporting to the contrary, the gun's use by millions of Americans has proven it to be a safe, trusted and reliable rifle.

• Both Remington and experts hired by plaintiff attorneys have conducted testing on guns returned from the field which were alleged to have fired without a trigger pull, and neither has ever been able to duplicate such an event on guns which had been properly maintained and which had not been altered after sale.

• Remington takes safety very seriously. We support hunter safety and other educational programs nationwide, and include with every Remington firearm, the "Ten Commandments of Firearm Safety," which urgently remind every gun owner that if proper firearms safety rules are followed, no accidental injuries would ever occur.

The men and women who build, own and shoot the Remington Model 700 take great pride in a product that, over the last half century, has set the bar for safety, reliability and performance."
I don't suppose that will settle everything, but it's a pretty strong statement that "Both Remington and experts hired by plaintiff attorneys have conducted testing on guns returned from the field which were alleged to have fired without a trigger pull, and neither has ever been able to duplicate such an event on guns which had been properly maintained and which had not been altered after sale." The truth is that any firearm can be made to misfire, either through deliberate act or through careless maintenance. If this succeeds in damaging Remington, you can just about bet that other gunmakers will become targets of similar attacks.

If "experts hired by plaintiff attorneys" haven't been able to duplicate the alleged misfires, should we take the reporting of CNBC at face value? Or could they have an ulterior motive? Firearms owners should never relax their safety precautions, but they should also be asking this question.

Steve
 
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