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Discussion Starter #1
My friends are planning to install a pellet stove in there house for this winter to help cut back on the oil cost, they have the stove already to go in the living room but have yet to get to venting it with lots of other projects at hand. They plan to pipe it into the small i believe 8" diameter hole that leads into the houses existing chimney. I am aware of using double walled stove pipe and heat shields i just am not sure about venting it into an existing brick chimney. i could use any helpful input on this, at this point it seem like someone is going to have to get on the roof an look down the with a light and see the condition and what the inside looks like but im guessing it must have been a pre existing pellet stove or wood stove that vented into the chimney since there is no fire place. I dont know if it is just a brick chimney if we should run steel pipe down it and if so does that have to also be double walled pipe or can we at that point change it to single walled stove pipe to save money? Any input will be great
 

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I would line the chimney with a smaller diameter pipe then 8", if that is what is inside the chimney. I have been heating with a pellet stove for 15 years now, tied into an existing chimney. I was fine at first but on really cold days the dense cold air would create an air dam, where I lost draft and the blower of the pellet stove wasn't strong enough. Atleast that is the theory to my problems. I lined it with a 4" flex liner from woodlanddirect.com. It's pretty easy to DIY.
 

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If the existing chimney is for a oil or gas furnace you cannot use it for the stove due to the danger of letting
exhaust into the house.
If it was a chimney from a previous wood burner I would get a single wall liner put in just to be on the safe side.
They have kits that you can put in yourself that has the pipe, damper and cap for around $400.00 bucks.

Good Luck
 

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pellet stoves have their own exhaust fan systemss. Too much length and the fan wears out prematurely. The little bit of ash that blows out must be able to be cleaned out of the system. Venting into a tall existing chimney complicates thee cleaning process. Result a pile of ash in the base of a chimney that can be a fire hazard eventually.

My pellet stove exhaust vent was only three feet high from the inside floor level and blew the warm exhaust out and away from the building. It only smoked once in a while when running out of fuel. But that was enough to worry about the ash. The folks at the pellet stove places will all warn against using an old chimney. They are almost always too high annd wide for the stove. Follow the stove manufacturer's manual, especially for the vent instructions.
 

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I am into eight years using a pellet stove. When it was installed by a trained installer for Harman Stoves, he would NOT connect the exhaust to my chimney. He cut a hole through the wall and the pipe extends eighteen inches out with an elbow pointing down to keep out the rain. Total pipe length from stove is about three feet and on the same flat plane from the back of the stove. My stove sits on an angle in a corner, so the pipe can not have a sharp bend. When in doubt, ask an installer, to be safe and to get the best performance from your stove.
 

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coffinmaker said:
I am into eight years using a pellet stove. When it was installed by a trained installer for Harman Stoves, he would NOT connect the exhaust to my chimney. He cut a hole through the wall and the pipe extends eighteen inches out with an elbow pointing down to keep out the rain. Total pipe length from stove is about three feet and on the same flat plane from the back of the stove. My stove sits on an angle in a corner, so the pipe can not have a sharp bend. When in doubt, ask an installer, to be safe and to get the best performance from your stove.
That's funny because Harman's own manual states that venting through an existing chimney provides an excellent venting option for normal operation.
 

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Believe me I argued rather when cutting a hole in the side of my house. My brother-in-law had a man install his pellet stove by putting the pipe into the chimney. He has had problems! Also they are having a lot of black dust on the furniture.
 

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idk, I'm tied into an existing chimney and it's about 24' to the top of that outside. Only had the one problem after about 10 years of use. Haven't had a problem since lining the chimney. (knock on wood)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well my friend already cut the floor and placed the title and set the stove, because the fact tht the hole in the living room was there. im guessing it leads into the existing chimney. so what im getting is it should have its own exhaust fan and doesnt require as high of a pipe for draft like a wood stove so maybe the best bet would be to go through the existing hole into the chimney and port right out the chimney somehow? instead of running the piping up the two stories.
 

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I am tied into my existing chimney which is lined with 4" pipe. The only fan is the exhaust fan that is part of the pellet stove.

One other thing related to your last post, I recently changed insurance policies and they had an inspector look at my stove setup. In the report I received they indicated that the my pellet stove was on tile and that tile is not code compliant. Thing is, I do not have tile but 2" thick stone under my stove. Just giving a heads-up on the tile as, according to my insurance, it is not up to building code standards.
 

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Not sure how much a pellet stove emits embers and soot but code for a chimney is 3' higher than the closest roof/object within a 10' radius. Again using a chimney that exists for multiply heat sources is not a good idea.

When I replaced the wood stove in my family room with a Harman they also said I needed to extend the non-combustible base under the stove to extend out 2' from the front in the event that a log rolled out if the door was open. They made that notation on my reciept that the homeowner was warned, and the installer said Nationwide could deny a claim if I had damage from this.
We were taking down a old building to put up another and they had 36" wide walls with 2" flagstone caps. Took a 72" length of that, met right up with the brick alcove I had put in when I built the house and it looks like a custom install and much safer then hot embers or logs dropping onto a hardwood floor.

I would get a professional's advice before I started using the stove and chimney. CO is a silent killer, and a fire in the chimney is not something to mess with.
Good Luck
 

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Just came across this and I'm doing the same thing. However, I'm replacing a cast iron wood (log) stove, unfinished basement install with cement floor and cinder-block walls, with a newer efficient pellet stove. I too will be using the existing chimney (4") about 20' in total length.

Not to hijack the thread, but after reading through this I have some concerns regarding the non-combustible base and distance of venting.

Will concrete suffice as a non-combustible base, the literature makes no reference to concrete? And, the literature states if the venting is traveling more than 15 feet that you should upsize from the default 3" venting to 4", which is what the chimney is presently. They (Lowes) suggested running 3" pipe down the existing chimney. Because of the distance the venting must travel I elected to purchase the 4" adapter and venting. Is this a crap shoot and should I return to the drawing board and consider a different install?
 
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