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Discussion Starter #1
I want to buy a compressor for working around the house but also want to be able to unload the muzzleloader with it. How many PSI's does it take to remove a charge from your muzzleloader? What type of fitting do you use?
 

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Your best bet is to probably do some trial and error stuff on your own. The variables are goiong to be great and probably depend to some degree on the caliber, the tightness of the PRB, the lubrication used, how much force was used to seat the load home. Whatever the case - make sure you have that muzzle pointed into a catchment to prevent richochets and to catch the ball.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've used a CO2 discharger in the past, they do work well.
I've never had much success worming them out. The puller usually just pulls lead out on the threads.
I read several posts in the past where members have suggested using a compressor and thought that as long as I was buying one anyway, I'd get some advice. Thanks for the responses so far.
 

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OK,

This subject has been kicking around for a while so let me add my two cents:

1. I am not a fan of using compressed air to remove a charge for two reasons:

a. Controling the air is difficult and takes a good bit of trial and error. The Lewis and Clark air rifle only uses 8 pds pressure to fire a 65 cal. round ball at 400 fps. so I would assume a 50 cal with the wrong pressure could be deadly.
b. Air added to a charged barrel could contribute to the gun going off if you are removing after a misfire by adding oxygen to an area that may hold a spark from the misfire. Very dangerous!

2. I prefer CO2 because the dischargers are engineered to remove a charge wih non-lethal force and they are CO2 so they do not add oxygen to the barrel thus contributing to a possible accidental discharge.

For the $30 I would buy the CO2 and live to fire another day!

GBJ
 

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Grey Bear Jr said:
b. Air added to a charged barrel could contribute to the gun going off if you are removing after a misfire by adding oxygen to an area that may hold a spark from the misfire. Very dangerous!
I use a compressor sometimes, that's a good thing to remember if there is a misfire. However, if the powder has been soaked in the water like it is recommend when you are trying to remove a misfire then that should not be a problem.

As far as controlling the air goes there are pressure regulators.

You had some good thoughts Grey Bear Jr that helped us remember safety.
 

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I've been discharging my Hawken barrel for 3 years now using my air compressor. I remove the barrel from the stock, put the air pressure up to about 40psi, I have the plastic covered air nosel that I place into the flash hole and I squeeze the air trigger.

I have the muzzle pointed into a plastic garbage can....and the muzzle direction is at an angle directed at a concrete floor. Of course, the lead projectile has never exited the barrel with enough force to go thru the plastic garbage can.....however...should for some mystical reason the charge go off, the projectile will bounce off the concrete floor, (once it goes thru the plastic can)...sail towards my garage wall.....and if it makes it thru the drywall and the vinal siding (which it should with no problem) it will then proceed to pick any given tree in the 7 acre wood it's headed for on the rolling hill behind my garage.

BTW....if it ever goes BANG....I'll let you know.

Dave
 

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A CO2 discharger is the way to go if you don't want to use a puller. There is no comparison between the pressures generated by a CO2 cartridge and a compressor. Most compressors only generate about 120psi while CO2 cartridges are typically around 900psi. A CO2 cartridge will throw a LOT of paintballs and it will completely inflate a new road bicycle tire to 130psi.

Before I bought a CO2 discharger I tried to remove a platinum powerbelt for future use since they are so expensive, these load pretty easily. My compressor charges to 120psi and I have a "special" plastic tipped industrial air nozzle that allows full tank pressure, any "standard" air nozzle is limited by OSHA to only 30 psi regardless of tank regulator setting. I inserted the nozzle and repeatedly popped the push button release. There was no air leakage but the powerbelt never moved. I used a puller trashing the bullet but later bought the discharger. A CO2 cartridge supplies high pressure at low volume flow rates, 16 gms at max 900psi. A compressor supplies low pressure at high volume flow rates, 30-60 gal at max 120psi.

Mathematically the rear of a 50 cal bullet presents less than .2 square inches of area, at 30 psi that would be less than 6 pounds of pressure. At 900psi it is a maximum of 176 pounds of pressure. Velocity would be determined by the sustained flow rate and pressure.
 

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My mentor, back in the late 60's, told me "remember, when you are pulling a ball, you are holding onto the projectile".

The way he taught me to pull a ball,
1. let it "cook off" for 30 minutes with muzzle in safe direction.
2. plug the touch hole or nipple and fill the barrel with kerosene, let stand overnight. This will "kill" the powder and soften the crud.
3. pour out excess oils before pulling
4. use a "T" rod with pinned ends and a tapered screw.
5. hook "T" over something solid but with muzzle pointing in safe direction.
6. pull hard
7. give her a good cleaning, check touch hole, percussion-pull nipple and clean drum area.

Its a messy way but it works, I have done several times. His thoughts were to never have anyone in front of the barrel, he stood beside the barrel when screwing the rod into the ball. He used a tapered screw with wide threads, it seemed to grab the lead better.

He was the "go to guy" when anyone had muzzy problems in this area.

I like the new CO2 outfits, a lot less messy and faster.

I have been to shoots where they had a portable air tank with the nozzle having a rubber end. Any problems, owner keeps muzzle down range and range master has a safety guy use tank to dislodge ball and be sure rifle is clear before clearing range.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the explanation Griz.
I think I'll get a new CO2 discharger. I had an older model T/C discharger but the seals are shot and it never really worked as well on my flinter as it did on my percussion.
It seems that there are guys who successfully use a compressor. It sounded like a good option.
Thanks one and all for your response.
 

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Lesson I learned. After using the CO2 discharger take a Patch puller and check for any compressed powder left at the Breech. The patch puller should loosen it up enough to dump it out. I was shooting a percussion GPR. Couldn`t get it to go off. I blew the charge out with the co2 and put a cap on and fired it to clear the Nipple channel. Had a hefty boom and fire out of the end of the barrel! Lesson learned....
 

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been using my compressor for some time now at full power aimed into a bag or box of junk.1 quick blast and every thing comes out.no problem.but to each his own
 

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Discussion Starter #18
What is the max. psi's for your compressor? What type of fitting are you using?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I use a breech scraper. It does a great job getting the residual powder out before cleaning.
 
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