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At the end of the day of hunting with your In-Line, do you guy's unload your gun or just remove the primer? In the passed I left it loaded and removed the cap. And I only do that it if, i'm going out 2 or 3 days in a row. Is that a good thing to do, is it good for the powder? I walk right out back and hunt. So I dont break any laws with the loaded gun in the truck.
 

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As long as the primer is out it’s considered “un-loaded”. I have left the powder in for the whole week and never had a problem. If it was a rainy, wet day however, I will remove the breach plug and remove the powder. FT
 

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If it is pouring down rain and I'm not going to get out for a couple days I'll unload it. The Omega is supposed to be 100% waterproof but I don't don't want to risk it. As long as the ignition source is removed with a muzzleloader it is not considered loaded.
 

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it's still not a good idea to keep it loaded in the house. the powder could draw moisture. I would just find an old log or stump and fire the shot.
 

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If the breach plug is easily removed...save the sabot or power belt. These things are too expensive these days.

Eliminates a messy clean-up also. FT
 

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I unload it, (fire it), but this year I'll have the opportunity to go all week so I'm not sure what I'll do this year, I might let it go overnight, but not all week.
 

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I remove primer & leave gun locked in truck. Suggest not taking inside warm due to possible condensation forming. Have done this for years & never a problem.
 

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I am a black powder sinner.

Mine was still loaded from last year, I took it out back this morning and put in a 209 primer ==== BANG boy i luv the smell of sulpher.

And I know this is a no,no... Heck I made myself do 50 marine corps pushups for punishment,that equals 100 for those that count like a civilian...
 

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"And I know this is a no,no... Heck I made myself do 50 marine corps pushups for punishment,that equals 100 for those that count like a civilian..."

The down part is easy, it's the pushin myself back up I have a problem with!
 

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Freytown said:
As long as the primer is out it’s considered “un-loaded”. I have left the powder in for the whole week and never had a problem. If it was a rainy, wet day however, I will remove the breach plug and remove the powder. FT
This is something that I would like to have clarified . My manual for my flinter says that it is considered loaded when the charge is in the baral . Which is it ? If the fact is that it is not loaded in till the primer in in then some one should tell them that they are misleading .
 

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http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/pgc/lib/pgc/digestpdfs/2009/generalhuntingregulations.pdf

It is prohibited to have any muzzleloading firearm that has a live charge of ammunition in its firing chamber and a primer, flash powder or a battery, whichever is applicable, properly positioned in the firing mechanism of the firearm rendering it capable of discharge, in, on or against any conveyance propelled by mechanical power. Any crossbow that has been cocked and has a bolt affixed onto the string or positioned into the firing mechanism of the device is prohibited in, on or against any conveyance propelled by mechanical power. For complete safety, a muzzleloader and crossbow bolt should be fired into soft ground before those devices are transported in a vehicle.

Your rifle manual is NOT the PGC law. Hope this helps. FT
 

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MuzzleMike said:
Freytown said:
As long as the primer is out it’s considered “un-loaded”. I have left the powder in for the whole week and never had a problem. If it was a rainy, wet day however, I will remove the breach plug and remove the powder. FT
This is something that I would like to have clarified . My manual for my flinter says that it is considered loaded when the charge is in the baral . Which is it ? If the fact is that it is not loaded in till the primer in in then some one should tell them that they are misleading .
The reason your gun manual says that is for liability reasons. You can not get shot with an empty gun. Most shooting ranges consider it loaded if there is a charge in the barrel. The PGC lets you carry it as long as it does not have an ignition source. I hope this clears up the difference in what you are reading.
 

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duckman76 said:
MuzzleMike said:
Freytown said:
As long as the primer is out it’s considered “un-loaded”. I have left the powder in for the whole week and never had a problem. If it was a rainy, wet day however, I will remove the breach plug and remove the powder. FT
This is something that I would like to have clarified . My manual for my flinter says that it is considered loaded when the charge is in the baral . Which is it ? If the fact is that it is not loaded in till the primer in in then some one should tell them that they are misleading .
The reason your gun manual says that is for liability reasons. You can not get shot with an empty gun. Most shooting ranges consider it loaded if there is a charge in the barrel. The PGC lets you carry it as long as it does not have an ignition source. I hope this clears up the difference in what you are reading.

Thanks Duckman.

That is what I thought . Myself I will carry the muzzle loader in my car going from spot to spot Dooring a day of hunting but it will get unloaded at the end of the day . I just like a clean gun when I put it away . Thanks Duckman .
 

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In my mind it's loaded if there is a charge in the barrel regardless what the regs say and I treat it as such. I am a believer in Murphys law that if it can happen it does. With all that said I shoot and clean mine at the end of each day.

I will lower the hammer and take out the pan powder and tape the touch hole with electricians tape if moving to another drive location and going back in the woods in short order. If the truck is warm and the air is cold I will shoot it and reload when I go back out.

With a charge in the barrel I just don't feel comfortable leaving it unattended no matter where it's at and I also don't like it sitting overnight if it has been fired once and has any fouling in the barrel. Blackpowder fouling is extremely corrosive and it doesn't take long to start working on the barrel.
 

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For my flinters, I dump the prime and dust out the pan with a small brush. I also tilt the frizzen forward to expose the pan and flash hole. then put the cock all the way down. Finally, I put a trimmed feather quill in the flash hole to help keep a channel into the main charge. So far - no problems.
 

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A few years ago at a local elementary school, Mom drives Dads truck to school to pick up K-student. Dads flintlock was in front seat, barrel loaded, no pan powder (at least thats what Dad said). muzzle was pointed down to the floor boards. Child gets in and rifle goes off, ball goes through the floor board and hits pavement (they don't know where it went from there) Kids and adults were everywhere being picked up /dropped off. Thank the Good Lord no one was hit.

A fellow HTE instructor was the Principle of that school. He said his heart sank when a teacher ran into his office yelling about the shot. After being sure everyone was O.K. got the adults off to the side and got the proper people involved before the media showed up.
It gives me chills just thinking what could have been!!
 

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Big Redneck said:
Child gets in and rifle goes off,
Static electricity can play havoc with explosives, certain detonators and propellants. The kid sliding across the seat sets up a static charge and when he touches the gun it ignites the BP.

The military use to write these accidental explosions off as user error but then there was an incident involving NASA where there were deaths. The investigation showed static electricity was the cause. That got everyone's attention and the military realized how dangerous a static discharge could be. Many incidents were examined, causes revaluated and proper handling procedures put into place.

BTW one of the most dangerous elements while handling BP was when using the old metal cans. The BP could adhere to the threads between the cap and the can and fiction would ignite the residue when turned. If the flame made it into the can you had a problem.
 
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