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From New York State Conservationist Magazine
Unlike most birds, turkey #vultures have an excellent sense of smell! They are able to smell carrion from up to 5 miles away, thanks in large part to the structure of their beak. As can be seen in this photo, turkey vultures have a hole in their beak, which goes all the way through. This allows odors to pass through from both sides, enhancing their sense of smell. The bony structure surrounding this hole also helps to protect the nares (nostrils) while eating, safeguarding the apparatus that gives them the best sense of small of all vulture species.
What a lovely looking creature! :LOL:
Bird Accipitridae Beak Condor Falconiformes
 

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And now we have Black vultures exploding their population in many parts of the state. I see more black vultures any more around here and these little beauties don't wait for road kill or natural death, they fly down and kill things
 

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The Kraft cream cheese factory in Lowville NY has three vultures circling over it just about every summer day. I don't know if they're nesting on the milk towers or just keeping an eye on the dumpsters for an east meal but they're definitely a fixture.
One thing I do know about vultures is that they're so stinkin ugly you'd be doing them a favor to shoot them if they weren't protected. :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
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Sky Building Plant Window Tower

And you thought your Philadelphia Brand cream chees must come from Filthydelphia, didn't you. :ROFLMAO:
 

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Many years ago I had an interesting experience with vultures. I hit a deer out on 144 in the SF coming back in the dark from scouting. I threw it in the truck, and pulled into my uncles barn to hang it and skin it. The blood, guts, hide etc went into a galvanized washtub underneath the the hanging deer. I quartered the deer, put it in a fridge, and closed up the barn. I’d get rid of the mess the next day. The local WCO never wanted the heads and hides.

The next day at noon, my uncle had a picnic. While we were sitting on his deck, I noticed a buzzard appear. Within a half an hour, there were a dozen of them, all circling the barn. Amazing sense of smell.
 

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The Kraft cream cheese factory in Lowville NY has three vultures circling over it just about every summer day. I don't know if they're nesting on the milk towers or just keeping an eye on the dumpsters for an east meal but they're definitely a fixture.
One thing I do know about vultures is that they're so stinkin ugly you'd be doing them a favor to shoot them if they weren't protected. :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
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View attachment 174593
And you thought your Philadelphia Brand cream chees must come from Filthydelphia, didn't you. :ROFLMAO:
They probably smell the stinky cheese and think it is a carcass.
 

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during the summer months we always have about 5 vultures circling over head while shooting woodchucks. now i know why, they can smell the previous kills that the foxes and coyotes havent picked up.
 

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There was a cattle farmer in Florida by the swamp where they were looking for the slug that killed the gal in Wyoming. He told the cops no buzzard circling the swamp no dead body. He knew what he was talking about. If he lost a cow in the swamp he looked for buzzards and found it.
 

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From New York State Conservationist Magazine
Unlike most birds, turkey #vultures have an excellent sense of smell! They are able to smell carrion from up to 5 miles away, thanks in large part to the structure of their beak. As can be seen in this photo, turkey vultures have a hole in their beak, which goes all the way through. This allows odors to pass through from both sides, enhancing their sense of smell. The bony structure surrounding this hole also helps to protect the nares (nostrils) while eating, safeguarding the apparatus that gives them the best sense of small of all vulture species.
What a lovely looking creature! :LOL:
View attachment 174575
From New York State Conservationist Magazine
Unlike most birds, turkey #vultures have an excellent sense of smell! They are able to smell carrion from up to 5 miles away, thanks in large part to the structure of their beak. As can be seen in this photo, turkey vultures have a hole in their beak, which goes all the way through. This allows odors to pass through from both sides, enhancing their sense of smell. The bony structure surrounding this hole also helps to protect the nares (nostrils) while eating, safeguarding the apparatus that gives them the best sense of small of all vulture species.
What a lovely looking creature! :LOL:
View attachment 174575
Mexican State Bird.
 

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Buzzards, vultures and other lovely things. For many years we made multiple trips to camp each summer, shooting woodchucks in Potter and Tioga counties, On the second day we often spotted 'em munching on the previous day's kills in fields. One day there was a red tail eating a 'chuck, surrounded by a half dozen buzzards that wanted the prize.

One or two would rush in and engage the hawk, while the others tried to grab a bite. Sat in the truck and watched that game through our binocs for some time. Hawk finally got tired of defending his find and flew off, ceding the win to the buzzards.

Had problems for years with squirrels shorting the fuse at our camp's transformer. Got up there and no electricity, had to call Tri-County to come out and install a new fuse. Few years ago they replaced the bare metal transformer arm to the fuse holder, with an arm covered in rubber. No more issues. This spring they installed a new pole/transformer. This one has no external fuse, like the old transformer did.

Years ago my cousin came over to camp with two of his grandkids on ATVs. One kid yelled that there was a dead turkey in the weeds out by the electric pole. Nah, dead buzzard. Also a dead squirrel on top of the transformer. Fuse hadn't tripped that time, but the buzzard must have spotted the tree rat, tried to snatch it off the transformer and got zapped.
 

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Here is a little test that might lead to people gaining a little more interesting knowledge about turkey vultures. Let's see who comes up with the correct answers first.

As most of you already know turkey vultures eat things they find dead and rotting. Some of those animals died of any variety of diseases and dead things tend to be hosts for all kinds of harmful bacteria and diseases.

Question number one -- since a vulture is getting all that harmful bacteria on it head what keeps it from being adversely affected from those harmful bacteria?

Question number two -- the vulture also walks around on the dead animal, getting that same harmful and dangerous bacteria on its feet. How does it deal with the bacteria on its feet and legs?

Question number three -- The vulture's first method of defense is to take flight when danger approaches. Does the vulture have any other defense behaviors and if so what is it?

Dick Bodenhorn
 
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