The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,416 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quite welcome !!


It's just a little something I threw together years ago. But it seems to have helped out GOBS of folks take any mystery out of a pretty simple process since then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,416 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
PA RIDGE RUNNER said:
Thank You Don. You continue to amaze me. Not only can you read writing you can write reading. Just kidding good sound factual article.
Quite welcome, Paul !!

BTW...... who read it to you ??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
947 Posts
Good article but they didn't tell you how to sight in your shotgun. After you shoot, turn the target over and find the center of your pattern, poke something through the target and see how far you are from point of aim. Best done with a bulls eye type target, not a turkey head.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,533 Posts
Good article for a starting point as he related.

I like Rugered prefer to use a large piece of paper 30"X30" or so. I place an aiming point/dot and shoot at 40 Yds.

After the shot I locate the center of my pattern draw a 10" circle then pencil in four evenly divided sections (Like a pie) and count the pellets in each pie section to determine distribution and the total the pellet count in the four sections to determine density for range purposes.

I shoot a 20ga. and my goal is for 40 yards so I shoot my first shot from there.

I look for a pellet count at 100 plus with even distribution in each pie section. I then make any necessary sight adjustments and shoot until I have the pattern centered on the aiming dot at 40 Yds.

Then I move closer say 20 Yds. and 10 yds. to see how tight my group is to determine the margin of error at very close range.

When using a small turkey head size piece of paper it can be difficult to determine if I am getting the center of my pattern on the aiming point due to the smaller surface. Thus the center of my pattern might just be off and perhaps the more dense part of the pattern will not print well if at all on the smaller paper but will be very apparent on larger paper.

Not splitting hair here, it is a plus for all turkey hunters to pattern their guns for range and margin of error at close range. I believe too many turkey hunters take a shot gun for granite and also do not aim for the head. If nothing else the turkey target does promote head shots and is fun to shoot and observe once the gun is zeroed in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,792 Posts
Lots of good info has been posted. In the Waterfowl world of pattering your shotgun the minimum size sheet of target paper is 40 inch X 40 inch. When shooting lead shot you might get flyer pellets and the bigger target allows for tracking any wayward pellets in your pattern. This would be helpful to know when deciding on which choke tubes to use.
Even though patterning your shotgun for waterfowl is different than turkey, here's a website with detailed info.

Shotgun Pattern
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,416 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
rugered said:
Good article but they didn't tell you how to sight in your shotgun. After you shoot, turn the target over and find the center of your pattern, poke something through the target and see how far you are from point of aim. Best done with a bulls eye type target, not a turkey head.
You make a good point. However the article was written as a simple tutorial.

When I truly "dial in" a turkey gun I shoot as many as 10 patterns with the best performing shotshell/choke tube combo at a 1" bull on 30" paper. I then take an 8" glass circle and locate the densest part of each pattern. Out of that 8" circle I locate the 3" core of density in each. Then I measure the left/right and up/down variance of the center of the 3" core from my P.O.A. I average all the measurements from both axes and adjust the gun's P.O.I. accordingly.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top