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I have never flintlock hunted before and I wanted to extend my deer season by buying one and trying it out so I bought an entry level flintlock a traditions deerhunter. I got all of the necessary stuff to set it up and went out to the range to shoot it. I shot 15 shots at 25 yards and I was all over the place. I actually missed the target entirely several times and I was sitting at a table using a sandbag. I was shooting 80 grains of powder and a roundball and patch. I am thinking that I may have been jumping a bit due to the delay associated with the flashpan with a flintlock. Does anybody have any suggestions to help me get some decent groups out of this gun. I really want to go out hunting with it but I think it is irresponsible for me as a hunter to go out if I am missing a target at 25 yards so I will not hunt with it until I can shoot decent groups with it.

Thanks ahead of time for any help.
 

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I would suggest you get an experienced shooter to shoot your rifle to find out if its the rifle or you.
Then if its the rifle I would start with your patch material thickness.
Good luck.
 

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my son also shoots a traditions deerhunter. it will shoot cloverleafs at 25 yds. his combination is 80 gr. 3f down the tube. 490 rb .18 pillowticking patch
 

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Shooting a flintlock is tough...shooting a traditions IMO.is typically even tougher
..the 2 ive shot were just crude..horrible triggers and locks left a lot.to be desired..were tough to get them to fire consistently let alone get them to fire nice and fast....the rough trigger and slow firing means a huge loss in accuracy...

There should be almost no noticeable delay from the time the trigger is tripped to the gun firing..

Biggest thing a flintlock shooter has to.learn is not to move a muscle until the rifle recoils...keep your head down and dont move...they arent called flinchlocks for nothin!

Practice makes perfect! Play around with pan charges and see if you cant get it to fire quicker...i know the 2 i shot had tiny pans..typically the less powder in the pan the better...

And thank you and good job not hunting till you are shooting well! Too many guys never take the time.to.learn and practice...
 

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Drabber, i too also shoot a Traditions Deerhunter. This is my 7th season shooting and IMO, its taken this long to figure out the entire gun and what i need to do to get it to shoot accurately.

- I too could not get a group shooting round balls. I switched to 245 Powerbelts, 90g 2F powder. The Powerbelts also are easier reloading after firing a couple shots compared to roundball and patch.

- if your trigger is difficult to pull, there is an adjustment screw in the hammer mechanism. There should be instructions for adjustment within the manual.

- Fiber optic sights make a world of difference.
 

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bawanajim said:
I would suggest you get an experienced shooter to shoot your rifle to find out if its the rifle or you.
Then if its the rifle I would start with your patch material thickness.
Good luck.
What he said.
 

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Funny thing about flintlocks, I can murder a paper target at 50 yards and miss a broad side shot 10 feet in front of me. I once considered fixing a bayonette to my flintlock :eek:)

Hook up with an experienced shooter and try experimenting with more/less powder. Practice practice and practice some more! Good luck!
 

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It takes a while to get use to the flash and clunk of the hammer.The jumping is most likely your problem. Keep trying! It will come to you. Try a pair of cheap glasses,if you don't wear them now. Seeing the hammer falling and the sparks flying,use to make me react like a big bug was heading for my eye!
DON'T GIVE UP!
Don't take to heart what folks say about your equipment,Work with it and you will figure it out? If no one is helping you,go on line and research and read,read ,read!
 

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The rate of twist in your rifle can be a contributing factor. It most likely will be 1:48 meaning the rifling makes one full turn in 48 inches. This is a very popular twist but is firmly in the middle of twist rates and should adequately shoot either round ball or conicals. Each rifle is its own entity and you must find what it likes best. Start with a low powder load of 70 grains or less and work up in 5 grain increments. You should see your groups tighten to a certain point and then begin to open up again. That point where the groups are tightest is the sweet spot for that rifle. I have little faith in traditions firearms as the one I have is as cantankerous as any I have shot.
 

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i would drop your powder down to 50grs to you get better i would also go with a think patch .018 or a .020 pillow ticking patch
 

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Get it grouping by trying all the variables.Then take it groundhog hunting this summer.Great practice on stalking and shooting.
 

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Look at 25 yards u should not be all over the place if the set up is consistant and the pwder load is equal to or slightly less than 100g . As with being proficiant with anything it is all about the enjoyment and practicing. You either fear it or love it. Last note, you need to see your target through your sight til you feel the kick, You will not see or hear the hammer if you focus on the target. Have fun and love it.
 

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I have had a deerhunter for 10 years or so and have taken 3 deer with it. My set up is 85 grains of 2f behind a 150 grain sabot. While bench shooting I can get a group of 8 in a 6 inch circle at 50 yards. I have experimented with 300 grain sabots and found that the 1 in 48 twist isnt enough with the short barrel and the bullet tumbles through the air.

You will hear of others getting better groups with different makes, and they do,IMHO The factory fiber optic sights that come on the deer hunter are difficult to really fine tune it to shoot 1 or 2 inch groups at 50 yards or greater.

Last year I sent mine back to the factory to work on the frizzen because i was losing all my flash powder. I also had them adjust the trigger pull . I then ordered a new set of fiber optic sights from traditions that they claimed were a bit smaller than the tru glow sights. They are made of plastic and I stripped the screw out while sighting it it for the first time. I am now looking into iron sights.

I love my deerhunter for its weight, I do a lot of hiking and it is a pleasure to carry around.

There are better FL rifles out there, But your deerhunter can be a great rifle. Just take your time , shoot it, and you will gain confidence with it.
 

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Well as the shooter of the AK 47 at the next bench said in another state, He was amazed how I kept my head down, before and after the shot. A normal shooter should flinch when the powder in the pan goes off, right in his face.

To learn that takes some practice time.
 
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