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Discussion Starter #1
I just discovered that a bear had destroyed my two best pear trees that were over 15 foot high and some branches in the middle of a chestnut tree that was over twenty feet tall. Also bent over swamp oak.

Hope to see the bear during the early muzzleloader season since I now have a vendetta against them.
 

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I just discovered that a bear had destroyed my two best pear trees that were over 15 foot high and some branches in the middle of a chestnut tree that was over twenty feet tall. Also bent over swamp oak.

Hope to see the bear during the early muzzleloader season since I now have a vendetta against them.

Hope you get that SOB (Son of a Bear). :grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Culprits identified

Friday afternoon I arrived at camp and had to do a little maintenance on the property so I filled up the side by side with gas and headed up the power line where I had the two chestnut trees and the oak tree that I discovered damage last week. I found new damage to my other chestnut tree where the main trunk was bent over 90 degrees and more branches bent over from the other chestnut.

After doing what I could there I headed up the power line and walked into the woods to where I have a ladder stand that is about a 150 yards from the chestnut trees. While I was replacing the burlap around the rail here comes a sow and two cubs from where the chestnut trees are.

The sow was very small and I would say maybe 150 lbs and the two cubs were probably 50 lbs.
 

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They are destructive S.O.B.'s !!!

We annually lose between $100 and $500 worth of Christmas trees to bear damage. They just break them off...………..because they can.

We hunt 'em because we hate 'em.



 

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Strut 10 why do they go after Christmas trees , I can see fruit trees but not Christmas trees , probably a easy answer. thanks
Because they can.

I think it's just an act of semi-random aggression. I say "semi-random" because, from what I can see, they target FAR more Christmas trees than just any old tree in the woods.
 

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Strut 10 why do they go after Christmas trees , I can see fruit trees but not Christmas trees , probably a easy answer. thanks
Who doesn't like the smell of freshly crushed evergreens?

Also may be looking for grubs/worms. I've had the tops of white pine broken looking for pine borer grubs.
 

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Because they can.

I think it's just an act of semi-random aggression. I say "semi-random" because, from what I can see, they target FAR more Christmas trees than just any old tree in the woods.


We have the same problem. The game commission claims that they are very itchy after hibernation and use the trees to scratch themselves, breaking them off in the process. I believe it is mostly Frasier fur on our place too.
 

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We have the same problem. The game commission claims that they are very itchy after hibernation and use the trees to scratch themselves, breaking them off in the process. I believe it is mostly Frasier fur on our place too.
Must be a HECKUVA a hibernation itch if it lasts through July, August, September...…………….

They don't seem to discriminate or be choosy here. Frasers...…...Concolors……..Canaans…………. Our bears are equal-opportunity vandals.
 

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Is there anything you can do to try to deter the bears from doing this? Every apple tree we every planted gets attacked by the bears. We catch a few on camera each year but never see them live in the woods...Id like to get back into planting some trees but feel its a never ending battle. Is there something you can spray on them or similar to deter the bears from wanting to attack them. Too bad they arnt smart enough to know if they leave them alone and only eat whats on the ground they will be around for many years to come...they just see a meal and do whatever it takes to get every last tiny apple off them.
 

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What I plan to do is when my fruit and nut trees begin to bear fruit and nuts is to pull them off for the first 5 to 10 years. Hate to have to do this but not many other options.
 

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What I plan to do is when my fruit and nut trees begin to bear fruit and nuts is to pull them off for the first 5 to 10 years. Hate to have to do this but not many other options.
That did not save our crabapple tree....I pulled all the fruit late summer after a bear nearly wrecked it the previous fall, but the bear still yanked the tree over and snapped it off this fall.
 

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Strut 10 why do they go after Christmas trees , I can see fruit trees but not Christmas trees , probably a easy answer. thanks
I’ve seen boars mark their territory by snapping off tree tops of small hemlocks and blue spruce. Both boars and sows will push smaller evergreens down and walk over them. I’ve seen them do this numerous times using the same tree. I believe that it’s meant as a scent post very similar to buck scrapes.
 

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Keeping bears away from destroying fruit trees is tough. Once they recognize them as a food source they will be back again and again. I have a half dozen apple trees that get hammered whenever the blossoms survive the frequent late frosts we get here.
 

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First time I saw this bears were busting off hemlocks, some 6 or 8 feet off the ground. Kind of me looking over my shoulder for a little bit!
 
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