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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
How do you treat your traps before setting? Any pictures?
Dip?
Paint?
Dye & Wax?
other?

I Boil clean with Lye, then Wax
 

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Depends what I’m trapping. Canine traps ( #2s) get boiled clean and dipped in wax. Skip the dye, no point in it, as they are gonna be bedded and hidden. DPs get pressure washed and spray painted. Usually white. Conibears get spray painted also, black or brown. They never get waxed. My muskrat and beaver footholds, I skip boiling them off, just dip them in wax. Leave them in hot wax long enough to melt off last year’s wax. I’m not concerned about odors with my water line gear.

I pay close attention not to over heat my canine wax, don’t want wax to smell burnt. I keep my canine trap wax separate from other waxes.

I go back and hit the dogs and pan notches with a small butane torch to dissolve and wax on the dogs or night latches.
 

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Boiled with a bunch of walnuts for dye, then waxed. I keep it pretty simple.
I dyed a dozen new Duke #4s ( great Pa. beaver trap ) in walnuts this year. I gathered up a bunch last fall, put them in a plastic tote. They were black and flakey, ( nuts were in there too) put then in a feed sack and tossed them into the half of a 55 gallon drum I boil in. I let them simmer a while and then soak for a couple days. The traps came out jet black. It’s been 40 years since I’d used walnuts, I think they worked better than the logwood dye that’s sold.

I did spray the traps with solvent when they came out of the box, then let them out to weather for a month to take a little rust.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Before treating traps, I check swivels, nametag and general condition of trap.
I set trap to make sure pan sits where I want it and to see if trap needs tuning. Then I dry fire trap to see how it closes.
Just like sighting in a rifle, I check & retune each trap, if needed.

When cleaning traps or preparing to boil or dip, check each spring for dirt, mud or debris. Clean spring if clodded, this may hold foreign odors.

Clogged spring holes
Before & After
mud trap 1.jpg

mud trap 2.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Before treating traps, check sping pins-
If you don't weld or brace spring pin on traps, they may get out of line.
The springs may shift to one side or come out of groove in frame. This will cause problems when firing, catching and holding canines.
This is an easy fix by tapping back into place & centering.

Below are examples of-
1) spring pin/springs off center
2 & 3) spring pin out of place/out of groove
IMG_0001.JPG

IMG_0003.JPG

IMG_0005.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Do you wear an apron when treating traps?

Monday & Tuesday, I treated a dozen & half traps I missed/forgot this spring.
Tuesday I waxed. I had clean jeans on, so I put on my flesh'n apron for protection when shaking off excess wax.
Apron when waxing was a first for me. I think I'll use it for future waxing job.

apron 2.jpg

apron.jpg
 

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Lot of good info, keep it coming!
 

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I dyed a dozen new Duke #4s ( great Pa. beaver trap ) in walnuts this year. I gathered up a bunch last fall, put them in a plastic tote. They were black and flakey, ( nuts were in there too) put then in a feed sack and tossed them into the half of a 55 gallon drum I boil in. I let them simmer a while and then soak for a couple days. The traps came out jet black. It’s been 40 years since I’d used walnuts, I think they worked better than the logwood dye that’s sold.

I did spray the traps with solvent when they came out of the box, then let them out to weather for a month to take a little rust.
I don,t like Duke Traps.I have to constantly work on em.My good ole Victors never needed work back in the day.
 

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I don't dye my traps. I know the guys used to say the dye helped keep the traps from rusting but since I've tried them both dyed and not I don't see any difference. What I do though is after I clean my traps I wax them. The wax both lubricates and helps with the rusting when I use antifreeze in the late season.I really don't bother what color my traps are. By the time an animal gets to see the trap it is on his foot. At that point I don't care if they like the color or not. What is your opinion? I've got some traps that are 40 years old and cause I take care of them they still work fine.
 
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