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I've been trying to find a good place to look at topo maps with the elevation lines on it so i can find some saddles and pinch points. Was wondering what you other guys use ! I use google maps often but it doesn't show the elevation lines ! I know you can buy topo maps from US geological survey ! I would also like to use on my computer so I can zoom in on areas if needed ! Thank You !
 

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try mytopo. you can overlay aerials onto topos and everything. you can pay $ to get a nice map made up for you or you can just view online or even snip and print.
 

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Goggle Maps has a great 3D elevation feature but it's not obvious to find:

1. Google a place in Goggle Maps in Map View.

2. Expand the left side panel.

3. Click the 3 bars at the top left corner.

4. Choose terrain on the drop down menu.

This not only shows topo lines, but displays the terrain in 3D relief.
 

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I agree with loridr, the 3d terrain on google is what I use most of the time and you can visually see the steepness of the terrain.
 

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I was lucky many years ago, in having a nearby place that had topo maps for the entire state. So I got the four quadrants that surround the areas I hunt in Potter and Tioga counties and keep them at the cabin.

Anytime someone asked me where to get such maps, sent them to the junky ol' "stationary" store that used to be in Lemoyne. Place was full of any kind of paper products, arts'n crafts, printing needs, etc. Helluva time finding anything in there, but they had it - someplace.



Unfortunately, it couldn't compete with the then-new Office Depots and Staples that opened in our area and closed down years ago.
 

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I usually use google earth. I take screenshots with my phone and then I downloaded a photo editing app. It allows me to change the brightness and filter which creates better shadows in the terrain.
 

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Acme mapper 2.0....switch from google to topo to terrain
 

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If you download google earth, you can click and hold down the wheel on your mouse (assuming you are using a desktop computer) and when you drag the mouse it will physically change the angle of the map to show you a 3D model of the topography.
 

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MyTopo is where I get printed maps. My son uses his smart phone in the field...just like having a GPS. But I'm not sure about coverage outages with a smart phone, maybe others can chime-in about any issue.
 

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Freytown said:
MyTopo is where I get printed maps. My son uses his smart phone in the field...just like having a GPS. But I'm not sure about coverage outages with a smart phone, maybe others can chime-in about any issue.
I had the GoHuntPa app loaded on my phone that included the topo maps. I took the app off since because the PGC was going to dump this program. Plus, I have an app that is listed as US Topo Maps. both are very good but depending on your data plan you could be spending more on your cell phone bill per month depending on usage.

I also have a Garmin nuvi 500 which is the waterproof, shockproof version of the nuvi. I use this on my 4 wheeler but also use it as a handheld device. I was able to download free PA specific Topo maps from a site called GPSFileDepot. These are great maps with trail and land ownership lay overs. However, these maps only work in Garmin products.
 

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apple store has an app called Topo Maps
By Phil Endecott
Cost $7.99; claims it can be used without service, uses the phone's gps 1:24000 scale
Haven't used or bought it yet, so can't say how good it is.
maps are suppose to be free, just need to down load them to the phone when on wifi.
 

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I will add on to what Surveyor posted about the digital version of the USGS paper maps via the National Map website. The new version has the ability to turn on and off various layers of the map including aerials and topo lines allowing you to create your own maps either by using the snippet tool on your PC or taking PDF versions to a copy center where they can print out a full size map for you (make sure of the dimensions to ensure it is printed to scale!)

I use a variety of websites and utilities for hunting as well - Google Earth, Acme Mapper, MashedWorld, etc.

I put together the following guide to help friends access the new digital topos with their layering tools.

USGS Topo Map Updates

The US Geological Survey has carried out a significant upgrade to traditional 7.5 minute quadrangle topographic maps. The new, high quality maps, referred to as “US Topo”, are now complete for the contiguous 48 states, include digital layering, and can be downloaded and printed on demand. Some additional info:

US Topo maps support frequent updating, wide and fast public distribution, and basic, on-screen geographic analysis. US Topo maps are available for free Web download from the USGS Store. Each map is delivered in PDF format with geospatial extensions (GeoPDF®) and is made from key layers of geographic data including - orthoimagery, transportation, geographic names, topographic contours, boundaries, hydrography, structures, and woodlands - found in The National Map. The National Map is a nationwide repository of integrated data from local, State, Federal, and other sources. Recent US Topo maps also include the Public Land Survey System (PLSS) and the United States National Grid (USNG).
Users can turn US Topo data layers on and off as needed, zoom in and out to examine specific features or see a broader area, and print the maps in their entirety or in customized sections on a broad array of printing devices. Viewing and analytical tools are available for free download from Adobe and TerraGo Technologies. File size for each US Topo is about 15-20 megabytes.

(A complete description and additional can be found at: http://nationalmap.gov/ustopo/ )

The GeoPDF files use the same names of the traditional 7.5 minute quadrangles. You will need the Adobe Acrobat software to view and print the maps. Use the following procedure to download PDF files of the revised topo maps.

1) Go to the USGS home page http://www.usgs.gov/

2) You can click the “Maps, Imagery and Publications” and click the link “Download free topo maps” or on the right side of the home page, click “Map Locator & Downloader”



3) This will open a window with a Google map tool. To find the topo map you need, use the Search bar to enter a street address, or type in a name of a USGS 7.5 minute quadrangle. You can also use the zoom in, out and pan tools to navigate to the location of the topo map you require. (It might be easier if you determine this information in www.maps.google.com prior to using the USGS map locator)





4) Entering the address 157 Chapel Road, Leeper, PA 16233 and clicking Go gives you this map:



The red marker shows the address location, the black grid lines show the extent / boundaries of the various 7.5 minute quadrangles in the area, and the yellow highlighted text are the names of the respective quadrangles.

5) Make sure “Mark Points” is selected on the right hand side of the screen. Next, use your cursor to click on which quadrangle you would like to download. This will place another red marker on the map. Next, click on the marker to show the list of maps available.



6) The popup window shows the list of maps available to download, with the most recent maps listed at the top. The maps with the label “US Topo” are the new digital layered quadrangles that include aerial imagery. If you click on the quadrangle name, you will be directed to the USGS store where you can order a printed copy of the map. If you right click on the file size (30.9MB in this example) and choose “Save target as…” you can save the file to your PC. NOTE large file sizes – it may take a few minutes to download the file and the large file size may be an issue when printing. ALSO NOTE: the file is a compressed *.zip file, which will have to be uncompressed with WinZip or a similar utility.

7) After saving the file, navigate to the file location on your PC and double click to Unzip the file. This will uncompress the file and reveal the GeoPDF file. Double click on the PDF file to open the quadrangle in Adobe Acrobat. This will display the map and all the features. On the left side you will see a list of map layers. Clicking the + sign will expand the list of features. Clicking the eye icon will turn on or off the features.



8) If you review the information at the bottom of the map, you will see the source and date of the aerial imagery. NOTE: printing the map with the aerial imagery turned on will take a long time or may not print at all, depending on your printer or the memory on your PC. You might want to use the Snipping tool in Windows or another utility to take snapshots of the map and then print them in Word, Paint, Illustrator or another software package.

9) Maps that do not have the US Topo label do not contain aerial imagery. The differences in the most recent maps are dates of imagery and also differences in labeling and linework on the maps. It may be beneficial to download maps that have smaller file sizes for ease of printing.
 
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