The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so I've been reading a ton about reloading and have been thinking about getting into it for a long time now.

I'm not asking about all that I should get or what brands to get just yet.

My first question is, where should I put the equipment? You see, I have a concrete basement that's unfinished. I have a gym down there and plenty of stuff being stored. My only concern is that in the months such as this, when the furnace isn't on, you can feel the dampness in the air. It just smells musty and wet although there's no real water in the basement. There are windows which stay open from spring until fall as well as a fan down there to try to keep air moving.

My other option is a detached garage which is not climate controlled at all. I would assume that the same damp feeling, as well as the sweltering heat of the summer with no air flow, would be present in the garage.

So for starters, where would the best spot be to place my reloading equipment?

Chad
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,538 Posts
Mine is in the cellar, but is climate controlled to an extent. If the moisture is going to be a issue you could always run a dehumidifier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's funny because it's only when the furnace is turned off. Especially now since it's still a little wet out from the spring. In the summer it'll get hotter and more dry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
If those are your only two options, invest in a good dehumidifier as RobOz said and work in the basement. Chances are you won't need to have the windows open in the basement after.

The garage will be a nightmare to keep any kind of climate control in As every time it rains and you park the car inside, you bring in all that moisture with the car.

Another bad thing is without some kind of climate and humidity control, your reloading equipment will rust quick. You can get a lot of money tied up in tools, casings, bullets, and powders... it would be a shame to not take care of that investment.

Just my 2 cents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,349 Posts
I have mine in the basement as well. During the winter the woodstove keeps things dry. This time of year the dehumidifier is running almost constant and needs emptied once a day. But like buck said don't put it in the garage. I ruined a MEC 600jr leaving it in my parents garage when I was younger. Thankfully it was cheep, I wouldn't want my Grabber to get ruined.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks fellas, I think I'll pick up a dehumidifier and do just that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,484 Posts
The problem is that your powder and primers will absorb dampness and go down hill quickly. When I bought this house, I treated the block cellar walls with a sealer. I run a dehumidifier thru the summer. Reload here often and never have a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,987 Posts
If you have a way to drain a dehumidifier I would recommend one. I use one in a very wet basement and it works.

I keep the windows closed as per instructions to prevent additional moisture laden air out. The dehumidifier drains into the sump pump so it needs little attention. I put the dehumidifier on a timer because the basement was so wet it would freeze up if it ran continually.

I run it during the spring, summer and into fall.

It has made a difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,917 Posts
In addition to a dehumidifier store your primers, brass, dies and etc in food containers w/a silica gel packet or two. You can even get them large enough to store 1#-8# bottles of powder. They and a packet or two will go a long way to help with a moisture issues plus its a good way to keep things organized.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
you say that the basement is unfinished. I take it the foundation of the house is made of cement blocks? if it is you could pour cement to make the floor more water tight. also run a humidifier to keep the moisture down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Slim, there is a concrete floor and painted block walls. It just a little dampness in the air that you can feel in the cool, stagnant air.

No more worries though. The wife has granted me some real estate in the office/sewing room. I'm hooked up now with a nice space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
Be careful, it's a plot against you, she wants you to take up knitting, my wife has been after me for years, says it's cheaper. I have my own slice of heaven now, no feminine anything is allowed in
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,063 Posts
I've worked for years out of a basement that was fairly humid. Kept powder lids on tight, primers in their containers, and never, ever had an issue, either at the range nor hunting. Not even with black powder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
I think as long as temp changes are slow, "natural" for the lack of better terms. Powder and primers and powder will not be effected. Many places store it in uncontrolled environments and do not have troubles. When it goes from 10 degrees to 80degrees in instantly you'll have condensation problems.

The biggest concern to me would be rust, humidity control will eliminate any problems. Temp itself isn't an issue
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
tdd, I have an old teachers metal desk in a shed outside that doesn't have heat. it has drawers that are made of steel and I keep all my powder, primers, bullets, etc. in. never had a problem with any of my supplies yet. as someone else said, I keep all lids tight and everything else in their boxes.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top