The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,127 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if this is a good idea.

I have a bottom along a creek that is full of weedy plants such as goldenrod, ect with a few raspberry and multiflora rose briars.

I planted a few wild plum along the creek hoping to put some woody cover amongst the tall weeds. Maybe the plums would 'thicken' the cover up for deer and rabbits when it snows during the winter?

Any other native plants that might be better for this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,107 Posts
Red Osier dogwoods maybe, perhaps some type of willow? These can be planted from cuttings if you can find any local.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
Red Osier Dogwood was a great suggestion. I'd also soil test then lime/ fert as needed. Also agree with kill the MFR.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,019 Posts
I have a creek bottom and one of the best trees I have growing is the swamp white oak. Some of the trees are already producing acorns at 6 years.

White pine does well in creek bottoms unless you have a lot of deer as they tend to eat them in winter time as well as use them for rubbing antlers.

Have you ever checked with your county on the CREP program?
If your land qualifies you can have it planted with native trees and shrubs at no cost to you, receive a sign up incentive and paid a yearly stipend per acre.

Program was put into place to improve water quality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
Dobsonknob said:
I may try white pine in addition to more wild plum

young white pines can make a great thicket
Our bunnies prefer Norway Spruce to White Pine, many more branches close to the ground and, you'll have less of a deer predation problem. Best to plant several different cover and food plants, increases you chances that atleast one will be successful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,459 Posts
Cool thing about spruce...you will plant them and think for five years your planting was a fail, then one day you will walk thru and you got cover trees.

We must of planted a couple hundred in the corner of a field when i was in PF, drove by that field for years never saw any above the weeds, then just a couple months ago we drove by it and I'll be darn...there was a nice windbreak of scattered in that corner. Turn to the back seat and told my kids...we did that!

I planted alot on my land but we are still in that "where are they" stage, couple more years i guess...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,032 Posts
Like pahoytman said, Swamp white oak is an excellent choice. I also like the Plum your thinking about and American Crabapple(PGC sale) should be good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,127 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I have already planted a few plum, would like to get more to replace the bush honeysuckle I remove.

I got them from the Missouri Department of Conservation.


I will look at some type of spruce. Already have some crabapple and hawthorn around in the general area.

Thanks for the suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Native alders do really well in moist soils. Stay clear of european alder. It has more of a tree form then shrub. It also has invasive qualities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
RB-HPA said:
Cool thing about spruce...you will plant them and think for five years your planting was a fail, then one day you will walk thru and you got cover trees.

We must of planted a couple hundred in the corner of a field when i was in PF, drove by that field for years never saw any above the weeds, then just a couple months ago we drove by it and I'll be darn...there was a nice windbreak of scattered in that corner. Turn to the back seat and told my kids...we did that!

I planted alot on my land but we are still in that "where are they" stage, couple more years i guess...
I've planted 2-3 yr old Norways within the past 10 years, the best of which are closing in on 20'. Have some Blues where the best, at the age, are maybe 8'.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top