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On North Woods Law last night, the Maine Game Wardens were patrolling what they call "The Slash" a strip of land between Maine and Canada. It was a mowed strip of land, but had treestands on the Canadian side. The wardens said they have problems with the Canadians shooting Moose in Maine. Anybody know more info about this International border, who maintains it, mows it, etc.
 

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I've known about the problem of Quebec hunters shooting moose from treestands next to the border. Was told about it by quys that hunt deer in that area and a lodge owner that lived in the area. Don't remember their tallking aboout a mowed strip, but that was pre-9/11. At the point that they were talking about it, the moose density was much higher in Maine than Quebec.
 

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Believe most or all of our northern border has that "slash". I've seen other shows of drug runners crossing it...


Not sure who cuts it or maintains it...either contracted out by the federal gov or done by the gov I would imagine...
 

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I hunted bear on the Maine Canada boader years ago and some stands were right off the slash. It looks just like a power line in PA. We were told that we had to wait for the bear to come to the Canada side before we could shoot. I happened for one guy on our trip.
 

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The Quebec / Maine border looks like Ft. Apache with out the stockade fence, for those of you that remember that TV show. "Guard towers" line the border just inside the line on the Quebec side. I wouldn't want to be a moose (or a deer) on either side of that line, that's for sure!
 

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If that's the area, the Canadian hunters have the advantage of getting to the border. Americans in Maine have few living on the Maine side, few roads to the border, and are screened for many miles by the St. John's River, that runs parallel to the border, some miles from the Canadian border. Few American hunters and a more populated moose landscape attract Canadians. For the Americans it's like no man's land for that area from the St. John's river to the Canadian border.
The Canadians aren't too far from Quebec and Montreal and have roads and an interstate type road that runs close to the border with Maine. Americans have few roads and the blocking effect of a large river.
 
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