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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Who knows that guy? The guy that wears the same darn clothes all season long, smokes like a chimney, coughs like a drowning bull moose, walks into the woods after shooting light, doesn't scout, hunts the same stand or stump, and manages to kill great bucks.

I consider myself an above average hunter. I archery hunt 30 plus days a year. Take all of the scent precautions. Play the wind. Shuffle stands around depending on sign. In my 35 plus years of archery hunting, I have yet to kill what I consider a true Pa trophy buck. To me that is anything over 135 inches. I hunt where they are. I have seen them. Came close to getting shots at them. Even missed one.

Every fall I prepare myself to try to not let it bother me when I start to see photos from friends or acquaintances who are "those guys". I am the type of person that loves to see others succeed and I am the first one to offer congratulations on any deer kill, but I am also man enough to admit that sometimes it bothers me knowing how much work I put into my hunts.

So who else knows "that guy" and who else does has mixed feelings about it even though you are truly happy for them?

I understand why I should not feel that way when I do. I don't want to feel that way. But at the same time, its human nature to have those thoughts. Who else will admit to struggling with it?
 

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Better to be lucky than good. I'm not "that guy" either. Hunting is a reflection of most of life, you can try and try and do everything right, still might not get the result you want. I'm told you're supposed to enjoy the journey and the struggle and not be too attached to the results............still it would be nice to "win" once in a while. I feel your pain.
 

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I have a few friends that seem to benefit from location more than from their actual hunting ability. They hunt private spots pretty much right out their back door with little to no competition from other hunters.
For the most part I would be happy for them but they have a underlying sense of arrogance and a false sense of ability. I know this because I have hunted with them on several occasions over the years and wasn’t impressed. Sort of feels like it’s amateur hour when I am with them . At the same time they will be the ones trying to give me advice and just seem to talk and talk. Can’t get a word in and whenever I am telling them about a hunting experience you can tell they can’t wait for me to finish so they can go on and on about themselves. Try not to let it work me up too much but I know I will be getting a buck down text from them this archery season and I will have to pretend how excited I am for them . It’s not easy.
 

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I am in many ways “that guy”. I’m in the woods hours before first light, and I do considerable scouting, but I don’t wash my hunting clothes, I don’t wear any camo, and I smoke a corncob pipe while hunting. I have a couple spots where I know I could stumble in after light and more likely than not kill a buck. I know a lot of guys that are really into scent control, won’t hunt stands unless conditions are perfect, wash their clothes with scent free detergents all the time, the whole routine. They put as much time and effort into that as they do actually hunting. There’s nothing wrong with that, it’s just not for me. To be honest though, those guys are not any more successful then the guys I hunt with that don’t worry too much about it. I understand how you feel, I think it’s normal to feel a little salty when you’ve been putting in tons of time and effort without success then watching someone who didn’t put in the time or effort stumble out of the cabin and shoot a nice buck. The biggest buck ever killed at our camp was shot off the back porch of the cabin mid morning on the first Tuesday of buck season one year by a guy that was too hungover to go out and hunt.
 

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To a large part success in hunting is a reflection of the amount of time invested. Unless you're really stupid, in which case you can devote all of your time to the pursuit and do poorly.

The fellow in the OP, that by all appearances does everything "wrong" must in fact be the "above average" hunter. He can do as he pleases, and still succeed. If you carefully scrutinize him, you will probably find he does a few key things right.....every single time.;)
 

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Well, I have to admit many of the most successful hunters I know are that guy. One of them flat out told me one time whitetails aint half as smart as most hunters make them. I tend to agree with him. They all scoff at scentlok, cover scents and other aids, swear it don't help them why waste the money. One of them likes to talk about a woman killing deer twenty years in a row with a smoke in her mouth all day and hunting on the ground with a 30# longbow.

Jealousy is a human emotion. Don't let it bother you. I have never considered hunting and work in the same thought. Hunting has never been work for me or I wouldn't do it.

They are just as serious hunters as I am so good for them. I'm going to quote two signature lines " I support all hunters, regardless of weapon or technique" and " Hunting is 90% luck and 10% location" Pretty much sums it up :)
 

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As a follow up to deer brains........Been chasing them 52 years and have seen them do some extremely stupid things. Survival instincts notwithstanding....their reasoning and decisions aren't always brilliant.
 

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No doubt as others have said a mere benefit of location. Honestly god bless, good for them.

What does get annoying is When you realize they are not all that passionate about the sport.
 

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deer do, what they do, when they feel like doing it. they do not have a set schedule. forget all the scent gimmicks and just play the wind in a good location for natural movement or a good escape route. i have killed deer every year since i was 20, some years, multiple deer. i am an ambush hunter. i get where they are going, before they do, and wait. this includes archery and rifle.
i am almost that guy, but i dont kill "trophy" bucks either. if it fits the PGC definition of legal, its the winner and goes home with me.
 

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There is no doubt an advantage to having private ground to hunt. Having been lucky enough to hunt private ground all my life,I can attest to that. In the 60s to 80s we also hunted large tracts of SF, because those lands were very close to being every bit as good. In the Northern Tier, anyhow . That tailed off in the late 80s...but there are now areas where that once again holds true.

A poor hunter is a poor hunter, regardless if he is on private or public land. More than one time I've seen guests join our gang for a hunt, and not being accustomed to hunting good private land they assume it is going to be a piece of cake to shoot a nice buck. We generally accommodate such guests by putting them on the choice watches, and more than once I've seen them leave our camp empty handed after several days of hunting. Many times its's due to not being able to hit the broadside of a barn with a shotgun at 10 yards :rolleyes:. Part of being a good hunter is being a good shot. Even on good property, you gotta be able to hit the game! And you must be able to spot game.....many times I've come out to watchers where I know deer have passed within view of them and "they didn't see a thing".

Deer just don't jump in your lap on private land.....just sayin'. But I have hunted enough public land to realized private land does make things easier.....just not to the degree it appears some believe.
 

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Hunting private definitely isn’t always easy but at the same time it can have some major advantages if only one or two guys are hunting it.
Can’t imagine what it would be like to walk across the road or out my back door and hunt a funnel that boarders a bean field or has a apple orchard . Then you also have the advantage of neighboring properties pressuring deer on to your property.
This basically describes my one friend and he is also not known for being a good shot but manages to get one every year . He also wounds one or two every year but there are so many bucks around it’s only a matter of time until he gets another opportunity.
I personally have no problem with this other than the fact he lacks humility and fails to recognize we are not on a level playing field. Hard to listen to a guy brag and try to dish out advice when you know all he’s doing is rotating between two or three stands on his own back 40 all season.
 

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In bow hunting, or otherwise hunting deer on a pattern, the advantages of hunting private property are definitely magnified. Public land can be frustrating when guys are continually disrupting deer patterns.

Anybody continually wounding a couple of deer a year should hang up their bow, IMO. It does happen, but should not be with such regularity. If it is that frequent, bow hunting is probably not for you. But that is an entirely different thread.
 

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Last year I was high up on the mountain getting sea sick from the high winds blowing me back and forth in the tree. It was also freezing with blinding snow squalls coming in about every 30 minutes.
Of course he got one a week earlier and decides to send me a txt that afternoon about how the lunar table says peak activity will be in three days. No he was not having some fun with me he was being dead serious. He was probably at home reading it out of some magazine . Made me want to strangle him.lol
 

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Who knows that guy? The guy that wears the same darn clothes all season long, smokes like a chimney, coughs like a drowning bull moose, walks into the woods after shooting light, doesn't scout, hunts the same stand or stump, and manages to kill great bucks.

To me that is anything over 135 inches.
I don't know anyone who kills bucks like that with any consistency that falls under that description. In all reality, even though it might seem like there are guys like that, they have to be very, very rare.
 

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Want to express my thoughts a little better because I am worried I may have offended some people. Anyhow I feel some of the best hunters in the country reside right here in Pennsylvania and they hunt private and public.
I just struggle with those who lack humility. Especially when I know their success is more a result of location than their actual hunting ability. When you get to know someone well enough it doesn’t take long to figure out what kind of hunter they are and how much time they put in. Some Just aren’t very knowledgeable and don’t invest much time but are still successful because of the property they have access to. All well and good if they remain humble.
Also have a low tolerance for those who ridicule others hunting styles or preferred seasons. Have a real hard time being happy for those individuals.
 

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Some guys talk smack and are arrogant and cocky. In the woods however, they deal with the truth.
They do know how, when, and where to hunt despite the behavior they put on around people.

And yes....location is more to this than anything.
 

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Hard to listen to a guy brag and try to dish out advice when you know all he’s doing is rotating between two or three stands on his own back 40 all season.
I work on the NJ border. Imagine listening to the above and knowing there’s 50 lbs of corn a day at each of those stands. Legal means of taking game in that state, but still.
 

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I never really cared for braggarts and know it alls so I guess it’s only natural for me to have disdain for those types when it comes to hunting.
 
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