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Last year I shot two doe that I knocked down but got up and ran away leaving no blood at all. I was using the 250 grain TC Shock Wave yellow tip bullet, not the bonded ones. one was straight on through the chest and the other was broadside, both were knocked down but no blood at all. Has this happened to anyone else ? I have had two people tell me that they quit using the TC bullets because they had the same thing happen to them. I was using 100 gr of blackhorn 209 so I should have enough velocity and the accuracy has been great with these but I hate wounding deer and letting them to the coyotes.
 

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I have used the 250's. Shot 5 deer with them. In past 3 years. I use mine in rifle due to its low kick and BIG bullet.

I use 60-70 grains of blackhorn 209. My theory is that I don't want it going to fast as it doesn't have time to expand. Slower is better to give it time to cause a large shockwave.

1st - doe direct shoulder - ran 15 yards
2nd - 10pt in brisket, heart exploded - ran 15 yards
3rd - doe behind shoulder - jumped her while tracking and never saw again... ran onto neighbors and couldn't track (don't ask)
4th - neck and dropped her
5th - 180 yards quartering towards - ran 30 yards
 

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dshannon said:
I have used the 250's. Shot 5 deer with them. In past 3 years. I use mine in rifle due to its low kick and BIG bullet.

I use 60-70 grains of blackhorn 209. My theory is that I don't want it going to fast as it doesn't have time to expand. Slower is better to give it time to cause a large shockwave.

1st - doe direct shoulder - ran 15 yards
2nd - 10pt in brisket, heart exploded - ran 15 yards
3rd - doe behind shoulder - jumped her while tracking and never saw again... ran onto neighbors and couldn't track (don't ask)
4th - neck and dropped her
5th - 180 yards quartering towards - ran 30 yards
Not trying to be disrespectful but this advice and hypotheses is wrong. Energy is equal to mass x velocity squared. Bullets are designed to expand at given velocity and expansion has a direct correlation to velocity. Lower velocity enough and you will get no expansion, thus being said, increase velocity and projectiles will not only expand violently but fragment in many cases. The thought that a literal microsecond in duration of travel through a medium facilitates better expansion over time flat is wrong. Easy to understand when a projectile traveling 1000/ftsec traverses the 20" of cavity in a little over 1/1000th of a second. A ML is faster than this example at most ranges. Even reducing velocity by 50% barely doubles that interval.

Read up on the Shockwaves. They are notorious for punching holes. That doesn't mean that there is no hydraulic pressure wave that destroys soft tissue but that is a function of a temporary cavity as opposed to a tissue destruction by direct impact of the projectile, in this case the Shockwave.
One solution is to shoot pistol bullets. They are designed to expand at velocities that mirror one of modern muzzle loaders. The Hornady XTP is a good example. Also, the aerodynamic advantage the plastic tip provides is negligible at ML velocities and range.

Ditch the Shockwaves.
 

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Have used the same bullet and believe they are the same as the sst. I shoot 110 grains of triple seven powder in fff and the deer, all doe, all broadside, all heart and lung area never have gone more than sixty yards with good blood trail. The exit hole compares to a 150 gr. 30-06 hole. I prefer an exit hole for easy blood trailing.
 

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I've been using the 200 gr Shockwave for almost 10 years now. I've taken 5 or 6 deer with them with no problems. At least 3 of them dropped on the spot, but 2 of those were yearlings. I was using 100 gr of 777, but now use 100 gr BH209.
I think the Shockwave bullet is made by Hornady and has a yellow tip instead of a red one.
 

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They are indeed, but I was referring to the bonded bullets (blue tips)...just not needed on a deer. Also you'll see a BIG difference in accuracy and velocity if you have an undersized bore or a true sized bore. One or the other will dictate what sabot you should use. I have a number of inlines that are slightly smaller bored andnthey LOVE the easy glide (yellow) sabot and will shoot extremely well with them. Theyll also shoot the standard black or red very well but you almost need a jackhammer to seat them they fit so tight. Conversely, my TC guns that are at true or very slightly over .50 cal shoot the black/red sabots great but are all over in both accuracy and velocity with the easy glides. I think some hunters go with the easy glides or a similarly sized sabot and are losing velocity, thus effecting terminal performance, especially with binded bullets.
 

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I've shot probably 6-8 deer with shockwaves and have been extremely satisfied with their performance. There are claims of them penciling on the web but I have not experienced that and have always had great entrance wounds and good blood trails (when needed)

You can dismiss the straight on shot. That isn't a good shot even with an '06. Other thing that makes me wonder is the fact that you knocked the deer down. Most of mine have been lung shots and they do not fall down. My guess it you hit it high(bled internally) or more than likely gut shot it. A shoulder shot will put them down but I doubt it would get back up. The best muzzleloader bullets are supposed to be the Barnes X bullets but I have not used them. I do not like pistol bullets and have had issues with Powerbelts falling apart also. Just my experience for what it is worth. You could do your own test with wet telephone books and see what you find.
 
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