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I have a tasco scope on a few of my guns seems like I always have to re-sight each gun in every year. I know there not being bumped or dropped, maybe the redicles inside the scopes are junk? What do you guys think?
 

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Tasco's are junk as a whole. If you can't afford a Leupold try a Nikon or Bushnell.
 

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I will admit that I don't know what the quality of today's Tasco scope are. The couple I own back in the 60's and 70's were all junk.
I have since gone to all Leupolds, they will take a lot of hard hunting before showing any signs of any problems. Most of the time once mounted they will need no adjustment unless you change ammo.
With that said I will also admit that I sent two back to the factory this year. One was 25 years old, that I took a hard fall with that would no longer hold point of aim. The fall I took was like slamming the scope on frozen ground.
The other is off my son's rife which is 10+ years old that also has taken some bad falls over the years.
Mine has come back, fully fixed, works great again. The cost was shipping to Leupold. His I just sent in on Friday.
I know the cost is a factor to a lot of hunters, myself included, but the new Leupolds VXI & Redfields, Made by Leupold, are in most hunters price range. Another trick is buy a used Leupold, off ebay or anywhere. If there is something wrong with it, send it back to Leupold and, they will fix it free of charge. You don't need to have been the original owner or need any kind of a receipt. Made or assembled right here in the USA too. It doesn't get any better than that in today's world.
 

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I know lots of guys that have Tasco scopes. Most of them never had any issues at all. I had one once, and it was a relatively decent scope. My problem was if it were cold out, and you got your hand even close to it it would fog up.

If it were me I would spend the $125 for a Bushnell Trophy. Great scope for the money. Anything better will cost close to twice as much. If nothing more than piece of mind. Nothing worse than haveing doubt in your equipment.
 

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Generally speaking, Tascos are about at the bottom of the heap. I would put Barskas and most BSAs down there with them.

On the other hand, I have older Tascos, some of which were made in Japan, that have held up well for over 25 years. Some are newer ones made in China or the Phillipines and also still work fine.

With optics, one usually gets whatcha pay for, although I've never seen much point in getting carried away? If it trips your trigger to spend hundreds and hundreds of dollars on a scope, go for it. There are plenty around today to choose from, that cost in the neighborhood of $200-300 and will perform up to par for most hunters' needs.

Something in a blister pack at Walmart, costing less than $100, should likely stay there in the blisterpack? Although there are folks that are happy with such things.

Everyone has opinions on scope brands, but mine have worked well for me over the past 30 years. Never owned a scoped deer rifle until 1978 and that one still has the same cheapo 4x12x40AO Bushnell Banner on it. And it still does sub-moa groups, too.
 

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Alot of Rifles are like that the point of aim will change sometimes after sitting all year..That is why it is always good to shoot the rifles you will be hunting with a couple times before the season opens.I had a rifle this year I dropped last year with a Leupold rifleman scope on it and it shot 2 feet to the right.I forgot about dropping it last year and now I will send it back to the factory and placed a temporary bushnell banner on the rifle. Sometimes the scope impact changes from year to year and sometimes its the rifle problem.There are alot of variables involved that is why to shoot before taking it hunting.
 

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If you have wood-stocked rifles the culprit could well be swelling then contracting of the wood which cause POI shifts....glass bedding stops that....

The above, along with a cheap scope whose adjustments shift, is a recipe for disappointment...

IMO, yes, the scope could very well be the biggest culprit..
 

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DennyF said:
Generally speaking, Tascos are about at the bottom of the heap. I would put Barskas and most BSAs down there with them.

On the other hand, I have older Tascos, some of which were made in Japan, that have held up well for over 25 years. Some are newer ones made in China or the Philippines and also still work fine.

With optics, one usually gets whatcha pay for, although I've never seen much point in getting carried away? If it trips your trigger to spend hundreds and hundreds of dollars on a scope, go for it. There are plenty around today to choose from, that cost in the neighborhood of $200-300 and will perform up to par for most hunters' needs.

Something in a blister pack at Walmart, costing less than $100, should likely stay there in the blister pack? Although there are folks that are happy with such things.

Everyone has opinions on scope brands, but mine have worked well for me over the past 30 years. Never owned a scoped deer rifle until 1978 and that one still has the same cheapo 4x12x40AO Bushnell Banner on it. And it still does sub-moa groups, too.
I rate this post positively.
 

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burk313 said:
Alot of Rifles are like that the point of aim will change sometimes after sitting all year..
That is why it is always good to shoot the rifles you will be hunting with a couple times before the season opens.
I had a rifle this year I dropped last year with a Leupold rifleman scope on it and it shot 2 feet to the right.
I forgot about dropping it last year and now I will send it back to the factory and placed a temporary Bushnell banner on the rifle.
Sometimes the scope impact changes from year to year and sometimes its the rifle problem.
There are alot of variables involved that is why to shoot before taking it hunting.
The Leupold Rifleman is a Piece of crap.
I refuse to buy any scope that does not have positive click adjustments.
The friction adjustment just doesn't get it in my world.
The one Leupold Rifleman scope that I bought on a trade with a nice Browning A Bolt 270 WSM - you couldn't even sight it in because the adjustment was so course.
I have a Remington Model 6 that had scope issues and when the new Bushnell Elite 3200 went on the Browning, the Rifleman went on the Remington.
It's sighted in good enough to hit the target at 100 yards, but is not accurate enough to say that I can hit the bulls eye or that it will make 1 inch groups at 100 yards.
If anyone offered me the $200 that it cost - they could have it tomorrow.
I would even pay the shipping!
 

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At the range yesterday a guy I know was shooting a .243 WSM with a Tasco. He made adjustments and bullets didn't change impact point. I told him to try moving backwards on dials to see what happens. Both elevation and windage were backwards, to shoot right, turn left and to raise turn dial down. I have a few older Tasco scopes from Japan and are ok, nothing to write home about.
 

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Far as I can recall, most older Leupies had the friction-adjustable set up, except for their scopes fitted with target turrets?

My huntin' bud had nothing but Leupolds on his rifles for many years and I shot most of them, used a few to hunt with over the years. First one I can remember that had click adjustments, was one of his fixed power varmint scopes and that was maybe 25 years ago?

Have a Vari-X II, 3x9x40 on my M77 25-06, but a stepson borrowed it last year, so I can't root it out to see what it is? Memory tells me it's friction, but my memory for such things ain't all that great now?

 

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Not sure on the your scopes problem.
The Japanese tasco's were a quality scope back in the day, but the new China ones seem like luck of the draw.
I have no issues with the ones I own.
 

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DennyF said:
Have a Vari-X II, 3x9x40 on my M77 25-06, but a stepson borrowed it last year, so I can't root it out to see what it is? Memory tells me it's friction, but my memory for such things ain't all that great now?
Bet he's hoping that you forget that he borrowed it!!
 

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I have 3 Japanese tasco's all bought in the mid 80's one even lived on a 338 win mag to develop some hand loads not a hitch in any of them I stear clear of any scope from China, Russia or the PI
 

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Bet he's hoping that you forget that he borrowed it!!
He knows better. Ask him now and then how my rifle is doing and remind him it better not have any rust on it.



He needed money years ago when he got married and his mommy bought it from him. It's what she hunted deer with for years. When he got out of the Army and decided to hunt again, she gave it back when she quit hunting.

Some years ago he needed money again, hadn't hunted for several years and decided he wasn't going to hunt any more, so I bought all of his guns.

Last year he started hunting again and pestered me to lend it to him. He joked last summer, that he thought I'd just let him have it. Told him "I ain't your mommy."



He can use it again this year. Don't really need it, have other 25-06s and it gives me something else to heckle him about.
 

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pymi said:
Not sure on the your scopes problem.
The Japanese tasco's were a quality scope back in the day, but the new China ones seem like luck of the draw.
I have no issues with the ones I own.
times tow! I have one, it was on my 30-06 Mod 700 ADL when I bought it 31 years ago. It was Japanese made, used to have that little oval sticker from the Japanese Optics Institute, same as all the camera lenses I bought back then. only needed to be re-zeroed after I took a fall w/ the rifle...

Still clear as a bell.
 

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I have a Tasco World Class on my deer rifle and its been a fine scope. I've taken spills with my rifle, banged it around hoisting it up to my tree stand and it holds zero very well. I can't rembember when I bought it. I think about 1996. I've got no complaints. However, my next scope will probably be a Nikon.
 

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rflktrman said:
At the range yesterday a guy I know was shooting a .243 WSM with a Tasco. He made adjustments and bullets didn't change impact point. I told him to try moving backwards on dials to see what happens. Both elevation and windage were backwards, to shoot right, turn left and to raise turn dial down.
Actually, the adjustments in all scopes are "backwards". This is needed because of the lens turning images in reverse. You can prove this by looking thru the scope while it is on a good rest, turning the dial toward up moves the reticule down. Always move the adjustment in the direction indicated.

Tasco quality control was always problematic - some very good, some very bad. Now that Bushnell owns Tasco, I have no idea what they are like. I have learned to stay from all cheap scopes. Can't go wrong with a Leupold, Nikon or Burris.
 
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