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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Started creeping in... It's in my head. Any advice?

Form feels good but as soon as the pin floats where I want it I punch it. Trying to concentrate on back tension and surprise release but my subconscious keeps taking over...
 

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Can't speak for compound, but I've had serious battles with target panic shooting/hunting with recurve. Only in the last 2 seasons have i begun to get a grip on it. Focus is the number one IMO...never take your eye off the target and "force" your mind and body to complete the shot by staying focused on your target and letting nothing else enter your mind. Do this by developing a quiet verbal phrase to yourself like "steady, steady, steady" or something similar. Non anticipatory release is important, but very difficult and comes with time. Watching deer and game helps while driving and instilling confidence in your self..."there's a spot I can and will hit, this is a dead deer" just my 2cent... Good luck

Also get out and shoot some ground hogs this summer if you can
 

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Years ago i had a problem like this!Not going to get into the story,but,my problem ended up being the anchor point of my bow or my body had changed because of a new string????
Mine had become to short. Not by much,but,enough that it had thrown my mind and anchor point off. It had become a little too short and i was doing as you have said you are doing!
It doesn't take much to throw off muscle memory.
Just MHO.
 

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My advise would be buy a back tension hinge with no trigger. You can pick up one used from Ebay or Archery Talk for 30 bucks or so. Something like a TruBall BT or a Zenith or a Scott Longhorn. They are a great training tool for the mind. Learn to shoot one and it takes sometime, but once you train your mind to shoot with no trigger it won't matter what release you use you will be a better shot. Other things you can try is if your using a wrist strap index finger release, is hold your hand open and use your middle finger to activate your release by using your back muscles and pulling straight back.
 

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I find it helps to not focus on the pins, focus on where you want to hit your target and wait for the pin to go there...
 

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Once your pin is where you want it in the peep concentrate only on the target. Your brain will subconsciously center it on the target. Every few years I have to remind myself of this when I start shooting during the summer. NOBODY can hold a pin absolutely still!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the advice. the input about the short draw length is interesting, because when I started shooting I kind of felt like the draw length was shorter and my anchor point changed. I didn't make any changes since last fall though so I thought it was me. I've thought about switching to a back tension release but am apprehensive because I shoot at a range with other people and always worried about it releasing when I didn't want it to and putting someone at risk and also looking like a fool. Maybe it's prideful but it's honestly a concern. The punching is pretty bad now though; to the point where if I keep my finger behind the trigger and not shoot at the target, i actually feel myself flinch when the pin gets to the gold as my brain says to "shoot now!"

It's frustrating...
 

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I had TP a few years ago, It was so frustrating, I went from the top shooter in my group at 3d shoots to few times i wouldn't even finish shoots that i was at, i would quit and just walk along.
The cure for me was
1. Back tension release.
2. Blank bale shooting.
3. Thumb trigger release for hunting.
4. Shooting with both eyes open.
I started shooting a scott long horn hex back tension release, and Highly recommend it.
Shooting blank bale is what helped me the most and continues to keep me true, If I don't have bulls eyes on my target face, i have nothing to freeze under, i can just center on target, or shoot several areas on the target and keep my pin right where i want it. If you have a bag target just cover it up with brown burlap.
I started my process of back tension shooting for a week at point blank range in my basement with the back tension release shooting with my eyes closed. The fist couple times that release went off is a feeling that i cannot describe, the following few weeks i shot point blank with my eyes open and focusing through the target not really looking at the pin.
At about the forth week i started shooting outside at a blank target face and could hold where i wanted to from any distance.
I changed to a thumb release for hunting and start alternating my practice between it and back tension release about mid August, I have the thumb barrel set up so i am pulling through the shot with back tension and have a surprise release, but you can still get a quick shot off in a hunting situation by squeezing your thumb.
I shoot several point blank shots in the basement before shooting outside every time, and i have not has target panic come back since i had it 3 years ago.
Its hard to describe, but i shoot with both eyes open and focus through the target. and not right on the pin, this takes some practice.
 

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PhiPatch074 said:
Thanks for the advice. the input about the short draw length is interesting, because when I started shooting I kind of felt like the draw length was shorter and my anchor point changed. I didn't make any changes since last fall though so I thought it was me. I've thought about switching to a back tension release but am apprehensive because I shoot at a range with other people and always worried about it releasing when I didn't want it to and putting someone at risk and also looking like a fool. Maybe it's prideful but it's honestly a concern. The punching is pretty bad now though; to the point where if I keep my finger behind the trigger and not shoot at the target, i actually feel myself flinch when the pin gets to the gold as my brain says to "shoot now!"

It's frustrating... [/quote

Target panic is no fun. It takes time to work thru it. There is no short cuts. I went thru it. Learn to shoot with back tension, blank bale, Then do the bridge.
Shooting at a blank bale to ingrain your new shot process into your subconscious. This is done at 3 yards with no target. Then put a large target up & shoot at it at 3 yards. Slowly move back in yardage. By slowly, I mean a couple yards every few day of shooting. If the TP comes back (even a little) move closer again & work back til you get to 20 yards.
 

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TP is the confusion between your subconscious & conscious mind trying to to do 2 things. Your conscious mind can only do 1 thing at a time. Aiming is what it should be doing. Everything else is done by your subconscious.
 

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I was shooting my vertical bow tonight after shooting my crossbow. With the vertical bow, target panic is something I always struggle with.
 

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I've always had luck getting close to a big safe backstop and shooting with my eyes closed for a bit...focus on form and grip and the release...


From there I go to a blank target...eyes open...draw...float... release..still focusing on form and release...



For me it seems to help...



The only time I had target panic bad was after shooting a techno hunt...i haven't shot one since...it was BAD. I threw an arrow off a 3 bale of straw back stop from 20yds lol..i didnt know what was wrong with me...
 

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I used to have a mild case of it. I would draw back my bow with an arrow but keep my finger firmly behind my release trigger so there was no way I could shoot. In the beginning I would get that sudden flinch anytime the pin got near the bullseye, but eventually it helped me get better at holding the pin on my target. You have to break that mental barrier, but it doesn't always go away for good.

If you are shooting the wrong draw length, or more poundage than your body is really comfortable with, it will be worse. When you are comfortable when you shoot, it is much easier to overcome.
 

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I find a routine in set up helps a lot. Routine means drawing the same way, anchoring the same way, floating that pin in a way that you do not think about it. IE: moving the pin from top to right, bottom up to left or what ever you feel is comfortable. I shoot from the left top, moving the pin to the target moving down to the point I want to shoot. If I think about it any other way, thinking gets in the way. Just develop a rhythm, and stick with it. I also try and disconnect from the shot. Sounds odd but I have only a few things running on rewind after drawing. And on a lot of key shots, I simply do not remember letting the shot go. Good luck, it can be a challenge but practice and routine will reward you with great shooting.
 

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I switched from a wrist release to a thumb release, Scott Exxus. In doing so i needed to learn how to shoot with it. So in a way i had to start over. After reading tons and tons of stuff about shooting techniques, the one thing that i did that helped was an aiming drill. So this helped on establishing my anchor point and my form. Pull back to anchor, concentrate on holding the pin on target. You will notice your pin float. Do this till the pin really starts to move off target. Let down. Do again. I did this in multiple sets of ten throughout the day, about 3-4 a day. I did this everyday for a month, never once did i fire a shot. When it did come time to fire, i notice i was way more accurate. I now hold on target for ten seconds, let down, then the next pull i hold for at least 5 seconds before starting to put pressure on the trigger. I am making myself concentrate on target and not rush the shot. I have gotten more accurate causing me not able to shoot groups at 30 yards or less, i was destroying nocks and arrows.

Also, the thumb release made me realize that i was creeping with my wrist. With the thumb release my anchor is way more solid and i'm able to keep a constant pull on the release. I have become way more accurate. What i once though was just my setup for where i hit a different yardages was actually my poor shooting form.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Just wanted to say thanks for all of the advice. Turns out about a big reason for my problem was the hair trigger on my Scott Wildcat release. After trying out several different types of releases it became obvious that because my trigger was so light, I wasn't wrapping my finger around the post and pulling through it with back tension, because any pressure on the trigger sets it off. I always thought a light trigger was a good thing, but after trying several heavy trigger releases, I now know better. The Scott isn't adjustable either, the small hex screw behind the trigger only changes the amount the caliper opens. So now I'm debating which release to get. I'm looking at Carters for their adjustability, and open to any other ideas. I want to stick with trigger style for now because there's not too much time left to get used to a new style of release.
 
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