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I'm not sure if the same conditions are across the entire state, but the non stop rain we've been getting are leaving streams high and muddy for over a month.

Is this beneficial or hurting trout in streams?
 

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Almost HAS to be good for the trout. Nobody can fish for them. This "summer" has been insane !! Aggravating. Disgusting......

Like your sig line BTW. Except I think every 8 days is being a bit optimistic anywhere east of about Altoona.
 

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Unless there is a flash flood(not even sure on that) I wouldn't worry too much about the trout. They will move to areas of less current out of main flows. A very good time to check out smaller feeder creek. I went years ago on opening day and the creek was blown out of it's banks by about 3 feet. The spot that Pop parked at was near a farmhouse that had a small spring house. There was no more than a swampy ditch under normal conditions however on this day there was about 1 foot of clearer water in the ditch. As I made my way across the ditch towards a hole I noticed that the ditch was full of trout. That was a lesson that I've used many times over the years during high water events.

Also if the stream is stable for a while then starts to rise and color up a bit, those big browns seem to put on the feed bag
 

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Except for a few massive blow floods that have happened the areas that are just stuck in high water should have bummer crops of nice fish next year. Rarely to trout get to feed hard this late in the summer.
 

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These kinds of rains are very good for trout. They keep good volume of water in the creeks, keep the temperatures cool, and provide a lot of food flowing down for the trout to feed on. So their survival rates, their growth, and their fitness is better than during hot dry summers.

Even a moderate flood does not really hurt trout. They can find slow, protected places to hide away from the main current.

It's only the extreme scouring floods that kill a lot of trout and knock trout populations down. For example the flood of fall 2011. In NE PA, such as the Loyalsock drainage and nearby areas, the floods were severe enough to knock down trout populations down a lot. But they bounce back within several years.

Also, these rains make conditions better for FISHING. Especially on the forested freestone streams. In dry summers the water is often down in the rocks through the summer months.

These rains provide May-like flows. Would you rather fish a stream that's nearly dry, or one with WATER in it?

When the big creeks are too high to fish, the smaller streams are in perfect shape.

And in forested watersheds, such as we have in on public forest lands, the water clears pretty quickly after a rain.

The larger streams draining areas with a lot of exposed soil, from farming and construction, will run brown for a while after rains.

But in forested drainages, where most of the soil has vegetation cover, the water goes from brown to chalky green pretty quickly after a rain.

You can get 2 or even 3 inches of rain in the evening and a lot of the small forested streams will fish well the very next day, when the big creeks will still be very high and brown.
 
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