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Discussion Starter #1
Found these while out picking Fox Grapes today...the vine was loaded with these things...they remind me of Kiwis...

Anyone Know what they are??





 

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Discussion Starter #3
Can you eat them?

That is the First time I have ever seen anything like it!!

Now that you say Wild Cucumber, I did forget to mention, I broke 1 open and there was those yellow and black beetles in it that get on Cucumbers, Zukes and other vining plants in the garden!
 

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I don't think I have ever seen thm bfore, and I look at plants alot.
 

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No, you should not eat them. They are pretty common down ths way, lots on the river islands and alogn woods lines.

Just like all plants on the north coast the Indian people had a use for wild cucumber. It has some of the same saponins that bear onion has. The Indian people would crush it and throw it in a creek to stupefy fish. Then they would catch them at the riffle as they washed downstream.

Other uses from Wikipedia: "Marah oreganus was used by Native Americans for various problems. The Chinook made a poultice from the gourd. The Squaxin mashed the upper stalk in water to dip aching hands. The Chehalis burned the root and mixed the resulting powder with bear grease to apply to scrofula sores. The Coast Salish made a decoction to treat venereal disease, kidney trouble and scrofula sores."
 

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John S said:
No, you should not eat them. They are pretty common down ths way, lots on the river islands and alogn woods lines.

Just like all plants on the north coast the Indian people had a use for wild cucumber. It has some of the same saponins that bear onion has. The Indian people would crush it and throw it in a creek to stupefy fish. Then they would catch them at the riffle as they washed downstream.

Other uses from Wikipedia: "Marah oreganus was used by Native Americans for various problems. The Chinook made a poultice from the gourd. The Squaxin mashed the upper stalk in water to dip aching hands. The Chehalis burned the root and mixed the resulting powder with bear grease to apply to scrofula sores. The Coast Salish made a decoction to treat venereal disease, kidney trouble and scrofula sores."
Ya recon some HPA members have had that in their drinking water, or do you figure it bioaccumulated in the fish they ate?

 

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Must have been in the water, you know, that hook cruelty thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
GalThatFishes said:
John S said:
No, you should not eat them. They are pretty common down ths way, lots on the river islands and alogn woods lines.

Just like all plants on the north coast the Indian people had a use for wild cucumber. It has some of the same saponins that bear onion has. The Indian people would crush it and throw it in a creek to stupefy fish. Then they would catch them at the riffle as they washed downstream.

Other uses from Wikipedia: "Marah oreganus was used by Native Americans for various problems. The Chinook made a poultice from the gourd. The Squaxin mashed the upper stalk in water to dip aching hands. The Chehalis burned the root and mixed the resulting powder with bear grease to apply to scrofula sores. The Coast Salish made a decoction to treat venereal disease, kidney trouble and scrofula sores."
Ya recon some HPA members have had that in their drinking water, or do you figure it bioaccumulated in the fish they ate?

 

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GalThatFishes said:
John S said:
No, you should not eat them. They are pretty common down ths way, lots on the river islands and alogn woods lines.

Just like all plants on the north coast the Indian people had a use for wild cucumber. It has some of the same saponins that bear onion has. The Indian people would crush it and throw it in a creek to stupefy fish. Then they would catch them at the riffle as they washed downstream.

Other uses from Wikipedia: "Marah oreganus was used by Native Americans for various problems. The Chinook made a poultice from the gourd. The Squaxin mashed the upper stalk in water to dip aching hands. The Chehalis burned the root and mixed the resulting powder with bear grease to apply to scrofula sores. The Coast Salish made a decoction to treat venereal disease, kidney trouble and scrofula sores."
Ya recon some HPA members have had that in their drinking water, or do you figure it bioaccumulated in the fish they ate?

Gotta agree. Some even believe hunting will be lost and the deer in PA will get sick and die if we aren't soon allowed to hunt on Sunday.
 

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John S said:
No, you should not eat them. They are pretty common down ths way, lots on the river islands and alogn woods lines.

Just like all plants on the north coast the Indian people had a use for wild cucumber. It has some of the same saponins that bear onion has. The Indian people would crush it and throw it in a creek to stupefy fish. Then they would catch them at the riffle as they washed downstream.

Other uses from Wikipedia: "Marah oreganus was used by Native Americans for various problems. The Chinook made a poultice from the gourd. The Squaxin mashed the upper stalk in water to dip aching hands. The Chehalis burned the root and mixed the resulting powder with bear grease to apply to scrofula sores. The Coast Salish made a decoction to treat venereal disease, kidney trouble and scrofula sores."
So your saying it's a fishing lure??
 

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Quarter sticks worked much better, but then they got too expensive. Plus, they was lots of fun to set off?

 

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Much quieter than quarter sticks.
It is interesting to note that indigenous people all over the world used plant to knock out fish to feed the village.
 

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skube said:
John S said:
No, you should not eat them. They are pretty common down ths way, lots on the river islands and alogn woods lines.

Just like all plants on the north coast the Indian people had a use for wild cucumber. It has some of the same saponins that bear onion has. The Indian people would crush it and throw it in a creek to stupefy fish. Then they would catch them at the riffle as they washed downstream.

Other uses from Wikipedia: "Marah oreganus was used by Native Americans for various problems. The Chinook made a poultice from the gourd. The Squaxin mashed the upper stalk in water to dip aching hands. The Chehalis burned the root and mixed the resulting powder with bear grease to apply to scrofula sores. The Coast Salish made a decoction to treat venereal disease, kidney trouble and scrofula sores."
So your saying it's a fishing lure??
http://ernielb.blogspot.com/2010/05/wild-cucumber.html
he's not but ernies blog is, I thought I read that somewhere before. I looked this up last year to identify it.
 
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