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Discussion Starter #1
Read two reports today of search and rescue missions, for vehicles stranded in remote areas in the north central. Two in the area of Medix Run, one Jeep stuck in a remote area near Morris. All required extensive efforts on the part of search and rescue personnel, to find and deal with those who had became stranded and needed help.

Probably not a good idea to head out onto SF roads this time of year when they're covered in deep snow, but it happens.

Reminded me of something I witnessed about 18 years ago in the Sproul. Back in there on a PGC "Bear Cub Molestation" tour at the time. The snow covered road we went in on, had been somewhat opened for the tour by PGC personnel and everyone was in a 4x4.

So, a dozen vehicles are back in there parked along the SF road, when there was a commotion in the other direction and a lifted 4x4 truck comes flying up out of a low spot in the road, sideways. They barely got stopped before running into the line of parked vehicles. Out playing in the snow, didn't expect to encounter people and vehicles back in the Sproul.

Guess it's fun to take your lifted 4x4 back on snow and ice covered SF roads to play? Sometimes you don't make it back out again, without a search and rescue team trying to find ya?
 

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I saw last month on Moshannon State Forest facebook page a picture of 3 vehicles stuck after that big snow. They mentioned that they may not get out till spring.
 

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Being the Fire Chief for my area I deal with this alot. People thinking that for what ever reason that they are going to go for a ride on non maintained roads that are only for snowmobiling this time a year. We get toned out and once I find out that they are OK and just stuck they get in touch of a local towing company that has a tracked wrecker. I believe it's a $1000.00 just to load it on his other truck to get it to were he can off load it to come get you out. We don't have any repeat customers since know one ones to pay that twice!! Always willing to help people who are in harms way but were not a towing company!!
 

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Common sense isn’t too common nowadays. When you spend most of your outdoor time alone you learn quick not to get into jams you can’t get out of. Thin ice, wading fast currents, rough water on the boat, hill climbing with atv, driving in deep snow, falling trees with the saw, etc...sometimes they don’t give you a second chance.
 

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My experience is that it's usually young kids! But old enough to know better!! Got toned out at 2:30am last Thursday morning for a young couple and there dog stuck about 5 miles back. PSP went back to rescue them out, then they got stuck, so then they called a towing company that should have turned down the call. They made it about 3 miles back and they got stuck. Once we got the right towing company on the call all was good. Point being that alot of resources were wasted for stupidity!! I was young once also but I would have never attempted what they did because my father would have kicked my $#%!! Just wasn't worth it!! Lol
 

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Well, as the old saying goes.” Good judgment comes from experience, and experience comes from poor judgment “.
Then again, as big brownie mentioned, good common sense will usually trumps poor judgment.
 

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What some people don’t think about is how their reckless behavior endangers those who have to come to bail them out. A number of years ago, two volunteer water rescue people died on the Slippery Rock Creek trying to recover someone who had no business playing in the high water conditions that day.

Every summer, the VFDs in the area get called out several times to extract injured hikers who ignore posted signs warning people to stay on trails. They end up falling 20-30 feet off ledges and then endanger volunteer rescuers who have to come to their rescue.
 

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They have those trail rescues on Chickies Hill outside of Columbia and near some caves near Pequea. One year when they had the old three day doe season dad and I was hunting at the Raymond B. Winter State Park on one of the back snow covered but plowed road and found an abandoned wrecked soft topped Jeeps. Stopped and checked it out to see if anyone one around but found no one.
 

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Saw a post about a young woman and a two yr old who had to be rescued this past weekend in Bald Eagle SF. She was trying to take her jeep from I80 near mile run to RB winter. Luckily for her she didn't even make to the first hill and it sounds like it was an easy rescue thankfully for the child.

If you do not have chains, a winch, chainsaw, and prepared to potentially spend a night in the state forest you are probably better off to stay off the forestry roads for a few more weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I read a north central news blog multiple times per day. All year long there are reports of lost hikers and hunters; Stranded vehicles (usually on some remote SF road); Snow mobile/ATV accidents; Water rescues (usually kayakers); And other incidents, where someone had to be rescued due to poor judgement and bad luck.

Keeps PSP, local VFDs and rescue teams busy, regardless of the time of year. Hardly a year goes by that someone doesn't take a tumble on one of the Grand Canyon trails and has to be hauled up outta there with broken bones?

Had over a mile cross country trek one spring at camp, when I was in my 20s. Had to get my farmer uncle to come extract my truck from a muddy shoulder on a twp. dirt road. Didn't realize the road edges were still that soft. He advised me to "stay on the pavement", or at least in the middle of dirt roads. But I think he enjoyed the opportunity to give me the bidness?

:)
 

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Well, as the old saying goes.” Good judgment comes from experience, and experience comes from poor judgment “.
Then again, as big brownie mentioned, good common sense will usually trumps poor judgment.
A lot of truth in this statement...Dad only had to come tow me out once...My rule with the Willys was to go in 2x4 far enough to impress the clty kids from school and use 4x4 to get turned around to head back...
 

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A lot of truth in this statement...Dad only had to come tow me out once...My rule with the Willys was to go in 2x4 far enough to impress the clty kids from school and use 4x4 to get turned around to head back...
I’ve been stuck a couple of times in my life, but always managed to get myself unstuck.
The worse one was with a old MB Jeep I bought to use as a hunting, fishing and trapping vehicle a year after I was discharged from the Navy. Along with two childhood friends, the three of us decided to do some preseason scouting one Saturday. I driving along an old woods road when we came to a ditch across the road. We got out of the Jeep to take a look and decided no problem, we could drive across it, poor judgment. The ditch was just wide enough that the front end was not quite out of it yet when the read end started down into it. Part of the front bank gave way causing the Jeep to slide sideways, which caused the Jeep to get hung up, literally, all four tires were off the ground. The Jeep was suspended by the front and rear bumpers being dug into both banks. Luckily we weren’t that far from the one friends camp, which had a high lift jack in the storage shed. So after getting the jack we were able to raise the Jeep and place so me logs and rocks under the tires and drive out. Of course while we were walking from camp back to the Jeep a thunderstorm came out of nowhere an soaked us. There might of been a little alcohol involved in this, don’t remember.🤣
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Came across this one earlier and thought it was pretty "special"? Cuba, NY area. Made me shake my head a bit.

At 3:41 PM on Friday, Clarksville Fire Rescue and & Cuba & Clarksville ambulance have been dispatched to Hamilton Road for a land rescue of a man stuck in a vehicle on the seasonal road.


The person is on oxygen, having difficulty breathing and is running out of oxygen..
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It continues:

Elkland Search and Rescue was requested by Pa State Police Ridgway Barracks Sunday night at 11pm to search for an individual who reported his vehicle had become inoperable in the snow.


The individual thought he was somewhere along Forestry Road 143 in the Allegheny National Forest. A Command Post was established at the Route 948 and FR 143 intersection. Members were briefed and responded with UTV 17-1 and UTV 17-2 to search the Forestry Route 143.

As members located and made contact with the vehicle, 2 individuals were located in the car. The vehicle was secured and marked with caution tape as the individuals were loaded into the UTVs. The individuals were then transported the 4.5 miles back to the Command Post, then transported back to a Ridgway location.


Elkland Search and Rescue would like to remind everyone that even though the temperature is rising and the snow is melting, most forestry roads are still impassable and dangerous for travel.
 

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I read a north central news blog multiple times per day. All year long there are reports of lost hikers and hunters; Stranded vehicles (usually on some remote SF road); Snow mobile/ATV accidents; Water rescues (usually kayakers); And other incidents, where someone had to be rescued due to poor judgement and bad luck.

Keeps PSP, local VFDs and rescue teams busy, regardless of the time of year. Hardly a year goes by that someone doesn't take a tumble on one of the Grand Canyon trails and has to be hauled up outta there with broken bones?

Had over a mile cross country trek one spring at camp, when I was in my 20s. Had to get my farmer uncle to come extract my truck from a muddy shoulder on a twp. dirt road. Didn't realize the road edges were still that soft. He advised me to "stay on the pavement", or at least in the middle of dirt roads. But I think he enjoyed the opportunity to give me the bidness?

:)
That grand canyon trail is pretty steep.
 

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Elkland Search and Rescue

February 27 at 1:51 PM ·
Public Service Announcement!
Most, if not all back roads in the Elk and surrounding counties are extremely icy and hazardous for travel at this time. Most state and federal forest roads are not plowed and maintained for winter travel. With the abundance of snow this year, most back roads appear to be plowed, this is not the case! Snowmobiles and snow groomers are running the roads down and give them a plowed appearance. These roads consist of multiple layers of snow and ice. When traveled in a car, truck or suv, the weight of these vehicles breaks through the winter covering and the vehicles becomes disabled.
Are You prepared to be in a stranded situation if You are stuck out there or your vehicle breaks down? Here is some questions and comments to think before an adventure. If You can answer yes to all of them, you are better prepared than most .
You told someone where You were going and when you would be home, correct? So if your not home by time "X" they will notify the authorities you are overdue and they will know where to look?
There are not any mechanical issues with your vehicle, correct?
You have good snow and ice tires correct? All season tires are not the best in this region this time of year.
Is your gas tank full of fuel?
Remember, most cell service systems doesn't work in our remote areas.
Would You have the proper footwear on or available to walk for help? Shoes, sneakers and boots that only come up to you ankles are not the answer to be walking for help when the snow is up past your ankles.
How about winter clothing? Many times, individuals have on blue jeans and a light coat to go for a ride. No winter coat, gloves, winter pants or extra socks are taken along.
A winter hat? You can lose very much heat out of your head if outdoors in the winter.
What about a blanket or better yet, a sleeping bag for warmth?
Do You carry a shovel for digging?
Tire chains that fit your vehicle and do you know how to put them on?
What about a come-a-long or winch and about 100' of tow cable? For those that have been in a stranded situation before, You can never have enough cable, tow straps and or towing chains.
Food and drinks for 24 hours?
How about medicine you need to take on a regular basis?
How about a half dozen of those hot hand warming packs? They can feel real good when You are cold and trying to stay warm.
Are You going to remember, when you are stuck and your adrenalin is pumping to make sure the exhaust of your vehicle is free of snow and ice so when your vehicle is idling you won't have to worry about carbon monoxide poisoning in your vehicle?
How about that flashlight in the glove box? Does it have fresh batteries and a set of spare batteries.
If you have all the above covered, the next question is, are the other passengers in the vehicle also this prepared to be out there? Your not going alone, are You?
Is this an all inclusive list? By no means, just something to help those who might not be wintertime travelers to prepare or possibly remind someone of something that needs updated in their vehicle emergency supply cache. And one more very important item, do you know what it is? TP, Yes Toilet paper! Your stomach will be doing flips and the little gremlins in Your mind will soon remind you that you shouldn't be in this situation to begin with! And if Your mind doesn't tell you that, guess what? Your significant other and or passengers sure will! Now back to the TP, what you ate earlier in the day will now decide to make a fast exit out of there(You)! Be like a Boy Scout and Be Prepared, you won't be sorry if You have TP! And by the way, "Leave No Trace", that means bury what you leave out there if nature calls.
Lastly and in all seriousness, It is not uncommon to be stranded for 8 hours or longer if stuck or broke down. Please Be Prepared, having the correct supplies can be the difference between Life and Death! Please Share This Message, It might Save a Life!
Your Friends at Elkland Search and Rescue,
Stay Warm, Be Safe and Stay Healthy
 

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I have been very fortunate in not getting severley stuck where I could not get myself out. The worst time was in a 1968 Ford front end loader/backhoe. In between real jobs I worked for a church and cemetery. Was digging a grave one early spring and you had to remove several bucket loads of dirt from the pile to allow for the vault . I was using the dirt to level out some low spots at the bottom of a hill where it met the woods. Walk the site, decently dry, dumped one load and the next load. As I turned around i hit a patch of thawed very soft turf. Almost instantly began spinning the tires. Gently rocked back and forth and it in worse. Went to the shed, got the 100# chains , used the outriggers on plywood to lift the tires up to get the chains on. Didnt work, got stuck even worse. Only other choice was to crab walk out. dig the front bucket in,curl it while pushing the levers on the back hoe to push away. Keep in mind this tractor had a seperate seat and controls for the add on backhoe and the controls were almost out of reach from each other. Painfully slow but got out and had some canyon deep ruts to fill in when it dried out.
 

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Samuel, in my 10 plus years of reading thousands and thousands of postings on the Huntingpa site, your above posting has to be the best ever that I have read on this site.

Continue with the very fine work that you and the other members of the Elkland Search and Rescue perform.

America is a very fine country and one of the things that makes it so wonderful is the many many volunteer organiziations such as the Elkland Search and Rescue.

Continued success in the future.

Dean Conklin
 
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