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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys: I bought a wood stove and now need to set up a chimney. I am planning to go with a metal pre-fabricated type. It is going on the cabin pictured below. My intention is to run it through a wall thimble (left side facing cabin) and would like to extend it about 3'- 4' over to a tee beyond the overhang. I would prefer not to have to cut my roof.

I was wondering if anybody is familiar with a bracket that might extend far enough out to get beyond my eaves? Any help is appreciated.

 

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Well, when I had my coal stove it was hooked into an exterior stack that was double insulated stainless. The exterior support was a standard off the shelf affair that, although I do not recall the manufacture, is a standard fixture You should not have any problem finding one. As an aside; one thing I learned was that you should consider eliminating as many 90% angles relative to the stack hook up as possible. That is not to say that a straight stack from the stove is desirable, and probably is not. But a 45% can be a better option in terms of draft creation. Great pic, BTW......
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks. That makes sense. I may try a 45 degree angle instead of a tee if I can find the parts. I have no clue if there is a bracket made that would alow me to support the chimney out past the overhang. I guess I need to find a specialty store and see what they have.
 

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tee on bottom for clean-out.must have!! you should only have 1 90 and 1 tee the rest should be straight up! wire can be used for support above the roof line, anchor at 3 sides to strenghen the chimney.
 

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If this is a permanent situation, you need to find a mason and have a proper chimney built.
Putting up stove pipe and venting through the wall or ceiling is a temporary fix, not a permanent solution.
I have seen all too many of these stove pipes that has overheated in the middle of winter, when the demand for heat increased, while the capacity of the stove pipe to handle the heat wasn't up to the job and the house burned or burned down. My family is all firemen / women.
 

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X2 to this

Trail said:
If this is a permanent situation, you need to find a mason and have a proper chimney built.
Putting up stove pipe and venting through the wall or ceiling is a temporary fix, not a permanent solution.
I have seen all too many of these stove pipes that has overheated in the middle of winter, when the demand for heat increased, while the capacity of the stove pipe to handle the heat wasn't up to the job and the house burned or burned down. My family is all firemen / women.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm not sure what you guys mean by permanent. It will be used for 2 weeks per winter but I'd prefer not to have to replace it.

Wouldn't a masonry chimney need a stovepipe through the wall too?
 

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A masonry chimney would have a flue liner/ thimble thru the wall and the stovepipe would go into it.....
 

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I installed Duravent Duraplus triple wall chimney last year. Went out through the wall through a thimble and into a Tee. They make a Tee Support Bracket that mounts to the outer wall and can support the weight of 35ft of chimney, but it really only spaces the Tee/pipe a minimum (couple inches)out from the outer wall. If you want to go out any more than that, to get around your roof overhang, you probably need to fabricate something. You want to minimize the horizontal run though to maintain a good draft, so I don't think going out 3 to 4 ft is a great idea. I had this same issue with the overhang. The other problem you will run into will be properly supporting the chimney laterally; mine needed supports (wall straps) every 4ft or 8 ft I believe. If you went out a few feet you would again have to fabricate something for supports. Other options to consider are to notch out the overhang(that's what I did) or box it/go through the overhang so the chimney can go straight up close to the wall. Or, start close to the wall then use 30 degree pipe sections to go out then up around the overhang. Your overhang might be too far for this though, as there is a limit to the horizontal distance you can go laterally with the 30s, because the weight of the chimney above that which still needs supported. Manufacturers should have all the technical data to support this for their parts. Also to consider is how high the chimney needs to go; building codes state minimum 3 feet above the roof penetration, and 2 feet higher than any portion of building within 10 ft horizontally. For a steep pitch like yours, it requires a tall chimney. Its gets costly buying all the components needed to run it this way. Its a lot more than just pipe sections. You may be best off running it straight up and through the roof. There will be fewer parts involved, less chimney outside to get cold, and a straight run/better draft. They sell all the proper parts to flash it, go through a ceiling, ect to go this way. I would have preferred to do this way but couldn't because mine was in a basement and had to go up through two levels of living space.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
That might be the way to go, thanks. That was my initial plan but people told me I was crazy to put a hole in my roof. The path from the stove to my roof is wide open so I wouldn't have to go through ceiling/floor or anything. There is a loft toward the back of the cabin but not above the place where I put the stove. Thanks again.
 

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Installed a 6" inside diameter SS insulated wood stove chimney at camp probably 30 years ago. Still looks as good as the day it was installed, except for some "soot" discoloration on the cap at the top of the pipe.

Black pipe from stove itself, transitions into the SS and thru the wall in the center of a stud space. Square metal piece on each side of the wall (one inside, one outside) centers the insulated pipe in the stud space, to the tee outside.

Those two metal pieces are about 16" square w/hole in center for the SS pipe to pass thru.

There is no heat transfer from the SS pipe to either the framing or those two pieces of metal. While the <span style="font-style: italic">black </span> pipe from stove to horizontal SS chimney "thimble" gets hot, can lay a hand on the SS pipe going thru the wall.

Where the tee is outside, there's a heavy (galvanized) steel bracket to support the tee. I framed a support for that metal bracket, from pressure treated 2x8s to get it out far enough to clear the small overhang.

SS chimney pipe itself extends up past the overhang about six feet, which puts the cap above the roof peak for a good draw.

Only way I'd ever do it for a stove against an outside wall type of installation.

I'll take a properly-installed, quality SS insulated chimney any day over a masonry one, especially one as short and as easy to install as mine is.
 
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