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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Going to attempt a stock refinish on an old gun. Its my understanding that I can use any water based stain. But what is the best product to build up a thick, high gloss finish??
 

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True Oil; I have used it on several stocks and the finish is very nice. I is applied using your finger. This is to keep out bubbles i guess. That is how I was taught.
 

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I refinished my grandfathers rifle many years ago and I used a birchwood casey finish. Rubbed it on by hand then wet sanded and put on several coats came out nice.
 

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I assume youre talking about the rifle youre getting from me? If so, I can post a pic of a 22 hornet in the same gun that I refinished a while back using Tru-oil only. Same stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Haha, you're right buckslayer... gonna be a little winter time project for me. Always wanted to try putting a high gloss finish on a stock. Does the tru-oil build up a thick finish, for instance one like on a Remington BDL stock?
 

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Yes, I hand-applied 8 coats to my Hornet, with light steel wool in between coats. I didn't use any stain, and it turned out light. If I did it again, I'd stain it first.
 

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BTW, don't sand it. Use chemical stripper and scrape the old finish off, then you can sand very lightly with 320 grit. This is just how I do it. I'm sure you'll get other good ideas.
 

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Tru Oil will give you a thick glossy coat....I would sand the old finish off.....and then apply the Tru-Oil with your finger, while wearing a rubber glove......put it on in as thin of a layer as you can get, and probably close to 10 or 12 coats.....if you steel wool between layers, it will dull the finish down.......just lightly scuff with a green scotchbrite pad to knock the "burrs" off..............

These stocks are done with Tru-Oil



 

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Hate the Birchwood Casey finish. Way to glossy and it chips and mars easily. I stripped off the finish I applied to one rifle the same summer i applied it.

I use tung oil as a base layer x 3 coats. Let it dry up several days between coats. Then use 0000 steel wool and go over it well. Make sure to remove all dust and particals before applying another coat.


After the last coat of tung oil - let it set for a full week or longer (after final sanding with 0000).

Get a can of spray on Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane. Pick your poison - gloss or semi gloss. Follow the application directions closely!!!


Build up multiple coats and do the steel wool (0000) between aplications. I applied about four or five coats.

After final steel wool buff - get a old nylon stocking. Cut a wide strip of it without any seams. Buff the finish with the intent on "warming" a section. No need to go caveman - your just buffing it up.

You know have a fully waterproof stock that the woods natural bueaty shows through. The finish is also tough as nails.


Most important - remove all the old finish. Then make sure that the stock is baby hiney smooth!!!!!!! Look up the many video's for wood stock pre finish prep. Follow them!

If you want to stain the stock - do it before applying any other finish.
 

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I've always used Formby's tung oil, you can get it in high gloss, applies the same as tru oil etc.

Buckslayer, nice work!
 

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I use Jasco Premium Paint & Epoxy Remover available at Lowes in a quart size. You need latex gloves!!!

Also buy some plastic putty scrapers, a couple of cheap chip brushes, and find yourself a old tooth brush. This stuff is waterless - on and off.

You apply it and let it sit and work. I work over a large plastic tub (something to contain drips and the old finish.

You scrape old finish and this stuff off with the putty knife. Then with paper towels and mineral spirits wash it off and stop the stripping action ( get a can of mineral spirits and some extra brushes for the heavier areas and checking too).


Make sure you have everything. Wear safety glasses and a old long sleeve shirt.

Some finishes come off easily. Others are tough. You may need to repeat the process on parts of some stocks. The back side of a plastic knife is handy for scrapping tough areas - gently..


Once done, if you have some light finish left - sand it off. Then let the stock dry out for at least a week.

The old Remington and a few others has a stain that will "bleed" red. Just keep after it.


Before you start stripping - have everything ready. No dogs, cats, or kids in the area. Read the stripper directions well and everything will go good.


This stripper does not raise the grain at all. Though it seems involved - it is one of the better strippers out there for this sort of stuff.
 

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Bluetick said:
I use Jasco Premium Paint & Epoxy Remover available at Lowes in a quart size. You need latex gloves!!!

Also buy some plastic putty scrapers, a couple of cheap chip brushes, and find yourself a old tooth brush. This stuff is waterless - on and off.

You apply it and let it sit and work. I work over a large plastic tub (something to contain drips and the old finish.

You scrape old finish and this stuff off with the putty knife. Then with paper towels and mineral spirits wash it off and stop the stripping action ( get a can of mineral spirits and some extra brushes for the heavier areas and checking too).


Make sure you have everything. Wear safety glasses and a old long sleeve shirt.

Some finishes come off easily. Others are tough. You may need to repeat the process on parts of some stocks. The back side of a plastic knife is handy for scrapping tough areas - gently..


Once done, if you have some light finish left - sand it off. Then let the stock dry out for at least a week.

The old Remington and a few others has a stain that will "bleed" red. Just keep after it.


Before you start stripping - have everything ready. No dogs, cats, or kids in the area. Read the stripper directions well and everything will go good.


This stripper does not raise the grain at all. Though it seems involved - it is one of the better strippers out there for this sort of stuff.
That's very good advise. Just be careful to not oversand in places where wood meets metal and the buttplate area.
 

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Deuce280 said:
Can a stained original finish just be sanded off?
That's kinda what I'm getting at. Sanding removes wood, so your wood to metal areas will not fit the same if you're not careful. The chemical stripper is the best, IMO
 

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I`ve learned , by experience, to put on THIN layers of Tru-Oil. Thick layers takes a long time to dry and will sometimes become "sticky". Also depends on the Humidity as to the drying time.....
 

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Ron pa said:
I`ve learned , by experience, to put on THIN layers of Tru-Oil.
I apply it with my fingers in very thin coats, so thin touching it wet doesn't leave a finger print! I wet the very tip of my finger and start rubbing, allow it to dry a full day, lightly rub it with 3-0 steel wool, tack it and apply the next coat.

This is Dad's old Savage Mod 5 I've been putting back together after 10 coats.



Bill
 
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