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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sitting in my muzzleloader and the after maybe 12 shots from 2 days the frizzen starts to get stuck and not move as freely as it once did. I'm going to do a total clean down and see if that fixs anything.

Does anyone know a good way to really loosen the frizzen because mine has always been tight and I would like it to become a lot losser.
 

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Polish up the parts that move along each other...the bottom piece of the frizzen and the top of the frizzen spring. Clean and polish the pivot screw and the pivot hole. Notice the POLISH part...not grind or sand, polish.
 

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make sure you cleaned off any packing grease from the manufacturer, and lube the frizzen screw with a good quality machine oil. As Jason said the frizzen arm could be rough where it contacts the frizzen spring, and it may need just some light polishing.

However, if it works ok from clean and then gets sticky, it sounds like it is dry and needs lube when you starts out and fouling is causing it to stick more. Try a slight dab of grease where the frizzen arm contacts the frizzen spring. See if keeping it lubed while shooting, at both the arm and the pin, does any better.
A drop of oil on the pin every five or six shots. Wipe off any excess from the frizzen face immediately, (with alcohol) it will interfere with sparking.
When the frizzen is flipped back and forth, there should be no gritty or grinding. No marks should scratched onto the frizzen spring. If marks appear in the metal or there is a grinding/gritty sensation, it needs a light polishing. Usually the springs are already smooth and there is most likely a burr from wax casting on the frizzen arms that needs to be polished. That can be often handled with as little as a single pass with an very fine sharpening stone. There is a fine toggle/cam action to the way a frizzen arm works and you don't want to change any lengths or angles.

If you are not experienced with dissassembly of the lock, find a seasoned person with the spring vise to help you. It is easy to destroy a lock with improper tools.
 

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I had to change a frizzen on my Traditions .50 a few years ago, and was somewhat apprehensive. Let me tell you. It's easy as pie with the correct tools, and you need but two. 1. a very small screwdriver to back out the pin (unless yours needs puched out), and 2. a pair of small vise-lock needlenose pliers. Simply set the pliers so that when clamping on the spring, you get just enough pressure to relieve the frizzen. At that point, it's all academic.

Hopefully Retiredusne8 will read this, as he provided a photo for me as to exactly where the spring should be clamped. If not, PM him.
 

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Fleroo said:
Hopefully Retiredusne8 will read this, as he provided a photo for me as to exactly where the spring should be clamped. If not, PM him.

A few drops of oil on the pivot points may also work,you don't want it too loose.
 

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I concur with Jason's "polishing" suggestion followed with a "drop" of Rem Oil on the metal contact points. Use the tip of a toothpick to apply the mere drop of oil.

Good shooting, and remember to aim small to miss small.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys for all the advice, Flaroo which frizzy do you get bc that's the same gun I have. Also what's the best way to "polish" the spring?!
 

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Honestly, every Traditions .50 I've ever seen has the same frizzen. It has the "leaf" kinda design on the rear side. Whatever store you go to, just ask for a Traditions Frizzen for .50. My guess is that it will look exactly like the one on your gun.

As far as the polishing goes. I would think a few strokes with steel wool where the Friszzen barrel contacts the spring. The spring itself, may have some surface rust which will cause drag, less likely would be a burr I would think. But steel wool on it too should spiff it up.
 

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I had a somewhat similar situation on an investarms rifle. I finally found it was dragging ever so slightly on the piece of stock immediately behind and slightly to the rear of the frizzen toward the front of the rifle. I had to take just a little wood off and refinish and all was well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all the input when I have time I will investigate. Anybody else have any input about the best way to "polish" would be?
 

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Make sure your lock plate screws aren't too tight.
The locks on both of my traditions slow enough to prevent reliable ignition when the screws are turned even slightly tight. I generally tighten them to where I think they should be then back them both out a 1/8-1/4 turn until the lock works freely.
 

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If you have a right handed flint lock they are the two screw heads visible on the left/ or opposite side of the hammer and frizzen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I just wanted to thank everyone for their input. I took apart the whole muzzleloader last night even the lock plate and cleaned everything really good. I "polished" the spring and then after I put everything back together I put some oil on the part of the spring that the frizzen touches. Although it's not as loose as I want it it moves the way its supposed to and the spark looks great. Now I just have to keep it that way.
 
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