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Here are some strange stones I have found in and around Chartiers Creek over the years. Any ideas what they might be?


This first one has a small, circular groove worn into it at just about the same place on both sides (a fire-starting tool, maybe?):






This one has a weird little donut hole in the middle (a weight for a fishing net, perhaps?):






And this one has a very strange groove running along it and has me baffled. Anyone have any ideas what it might be?






Thanks!
 

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Not sure about the doughnut hole or the grooved piece but I have found numerous stones with the "thumbholes?" on each side on a site where I find alot of arrowheads and pot shards. I call them hammerstones but I'm not sure if that is the correct term. I always thought they were used for pecking or hammering. Perhaps even as a tool for knapping flint. I'm also open to hear what others here might think.
 

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those marking could be made by nature ie the stream current. take a look at some of the rocks above the falls in ohiopyle. they have some pretty intricate designs in them just from how the water spins.
 

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Uncle Johnny, You have one cultural artifact and the rest are what we in the profession call leaverites (leave them right where you found them) LOL. The one true artifact is the "pitted stone". It is the first one you presented. They are very common on prehistoric sites in your area. You can find them with one pit on one side, a pit on both sides, and I have seen them with multiple pits on them. Your hypothesis about use in making a fire is a possibility I have seen then fired (black and red). Yours could have been used as an anvil stone or nutting stone as I do not see evidence of fire in the photo. The natives in your area were using local cherts like uniontown, ten mile, loyalhanna, brush creek, as well as others. Uniontown Chert actually outcrops on Chartiers Creek. I have found the chert in Mt. Lebanon Pa. in a tributary flowing into Chartiers Creek. My guess would be an anvil stone used to hold a creek cobble to crack it. Once the native cracks it the cobble can be knapped into a spearpoint, arrowhead, or tool. Natives in your area used a cobble from onondaga chert. If you found it in the stream you can bet the site is VERY close. Remember the streams are the lands blood. Hope this info helps... Remember to record and protect archaeological sites for the future. Enjoy your find!!!
 
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