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Discussion Starter #1
I'm new here but love cooking and hope to share and learn. I noticed a thread on rubs--my favorite(s) are one I make and Mountain Man Bourbon Rub from Cabelas.

Here is mine--which is Emeril Lagasse's Essence--as modified by me:
2 1/2 table spoon smoked paprika
2 table spoon table salt
2 table spoon garlic powder
1 table spoon dry mustard
1 table spoon powdered horse radish
1 table spoon onion powder
1 table spoon black pepper
1 table spoon cayenne pepper
1 table spoon each tyme and oregano


That was the first outing a couple of years ago. There has been a lot of great stuff come out of that. We will be up at the cabin this weekend and it will be "in service" at least two days.

It was made by Brinkman--but I think discontinued--it weighs 500 lbs!
 

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That's one dandy smoker there! Lot's of good eating in there, is that Jarlsburg cheese on the top rack? Everything looks good!
 

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thats a awesome looking smoker, i have an original new braunfels offset back from when they were still made in texas. my next one will be a lang but thats still down the road a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Bearclaw said:
That's one dandy smoker there! Lot's of good eating in there, is that Jarlsburg cheese on the top rack? Everything looks good!
Yes it is


Cheese is a challenge when doing meat in the primary chamber (#2). Barbecue should be done at 225 to 250 F, that means the last chamber will be 150 to 175--high for most cheese and it will want to melt. Best temperature for most cheese is about 110---so it goes better with smoking fish.

The drier and harder the cheese is the better. I have taken to doing most cheese now in pie plates if I am barbecuing--I prefer that to picking it out of the bottom of the chamber


I also use mostly oak rather than hickory--but I also use a mix. I'll be doing ribs this weekend and for that I use a combination of oak, apple and cherry--about 6 hours for St Louis style ribs.
 

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If you want something really spectacular, try throwing on a couple whole front quarters of the deer you get this year. I cut the front quarters off and trim off the flank meat and flaps so it's just the meat on the leg bones and shoulder. Don't need any rub, but you can if you'd like. Smoke it low and slow until done, about 3-5 hours. The "stringy" stuff in the lower hocks turns to a jelly that scrapes right off and imparts great flavor in the meat.

When done, debone the meat (ususally falls right off) and chop it up into cubes. I then vacuum seal it in quart bags to freeze. It makes absolutely the best chili in the world. It's also great to use a bit in dips and baked beans instead of bacon.

Love your smoker. Wish mine had a chimney unit on the side like yours.
 

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smoked deer rocks. my hunting buddy did a whole hind quarter last year, deer ham is the BEST - might have to do a shoulder this year
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have a local butcher that I have do one--and sometimes both hind quarters as dry beef which we love.

I have never tried any venison in the smoker but if I get one in bow season I will give that a try.

The problem with my smoker in cold weather is thermal stratification in the second chamber. I can keep the temperature at the right level in the top of the chamber but not the bottom.

One year I made a 22# turkey for Thanksgiving dinner (I went up a couple of days early and did it on Wednesday). I didn't turn it over; the top was done--and great--but not the bottom
 
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