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Some cheeses that are ready to go into the freezer.
These are cheddars that were smoked and then vacuum sealed. They could be eaten now, but will actually be better after they rest for a couple of months.
 

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Smoked cheeses are expensive to buy, but I already own a smoker and have been catching cheddar on sale at the supermarket just about every other week. So, that cheddar is a $2.50 item that I've turned into something that is considered to be a gourmet item and would sell for about ten bucks. Of course I don't sell it but it is a great gift to give to someone, and there have been occasions when I liked a visitor enough to come out of the kitchen with a meat and cheese platter loaded with the kind of stuff that makes them want to come back for more.
I use an assortment of chips when I'm smoking meats and cheeses but this time I wanted to still be able to taste the cheddar so I only lightly smoked the cheeses over apple wood for about two hours.
 

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Laylow your buddy needs to look into an A-Maze-N smoke generator, which does not build up any appreciable heat in a smokehouse or grill. Once he has a smoke generator that doesn't heat the smokehouse he can use early spring and late fall days low temperatures to cold smoke all sorts of meats, cheeses, nuts, and other stuff.

(I keep my smokehouse temp under 60 degrees when I do cheeses)
 

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i smoke cheese for two hours in my big chief smoker. it doesnt have a temp control. when the door is on, the high temp is right around 160. when i smoke the cheese i use the top 2 racks and leave the door half off, almost like cold smoking. i use mozzarella. going to try swiss and cheddar next.


diyasub...smoked cheese is great when making mac-n-cheese :)
 

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My buddy has a smoke house. I call it an outhouse. He's tried cheese before but it doesn't come out firm like smoked gorda. Kind of mushy and soft. Any secret temperatures?
Anyway that looks great.
Your buddy could create a cold smoke by constructing a cold smoke option...basically a small combustion chamber separate from the smoke house, with a smoke pipe running from the chamber to the "outhouse". The length of the pipe will dictate the temp. A pretty cheap and easy modification.

I love Colby with a fairly heavy smoke.
 

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DIYASUB, do you see any change in the texture of the cheese when you freeze it? I’ve froze sliced American cheese ( not smoked) and it usually seems like it crumbles a little.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
DIYASUB, do you see any change in the texture of the cheese when you freeze it? I’ve froze sliced American cheese ( not smoked) and it usually seems like it crumbles a little.
I haven't noticed any great change in the cheddar, which is a little crumbly to begin with.
I got off to a late start with this but I hope to do more in the fall when the temperatures cooperate a bit more. In addition to the other hard cheeses I've heard a lot about smoked mozzarella and I'm thinking that could be a good topping on pizza so I'm gonna have to give that a try.
It looks like there's plenty of fun to be had.
 

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I haven't noticed any great change in the cheddar, which is a little crumbly to begin with.
I got off to a late start with this but I hope to do more in the fall when the temperatures cooperate a bit more. In addition to the other hard cheeses I've heard a lot about smoked mozzarella and I'm thinking that could be a good topping on pizza so I'm gonna have to give that a try.
It looks like there's plenty of fun to be had.

i get my mozzarella from walmart. it comes in an 8oz block in the cheese section for right around $1.75, usually grab the box. it holds around 10 packs.
 

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i smoke cheese for two hours in my big chief smoker. it doesnt have a temp control. when the door is on, the high temp is right around 160. when i smoke the cheese i use the top 2 racks and leave the door half off, almost like cold smoking. i use mozzarella. going to try swiss and cheddar next.
I cold smoke cheese using a A-Maze-N smoke generator in the gas grill. Fire up the smoke generator, set in it in the gill, place the cheese on a stainless grate then close the lid. Time wise I smoke it for at least four hours turning it over every hour.
For our tastes we like pecan smoked cheeses, swiss, sharp chedder and colby. The pecan give it a more robust flavor then apple but not quite as strong as hickory.
After its smoked I package it in reusable vacuum bags, put in the small refrig set at 40 degrees and let it age for at least four months to allow the smoke flavor to permeate all the way though to it's center.

Bill
 

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The goal in smoking cheese is to make smoke without much heat.

Cheese has a very low temperature range and most smokers create way too much heat for it even on the coldest days. Most cheese tends to start to melt around 65 degrees. Anything more than about 95 degrees and it just becomes a mushy mess.

To do this I use a large can from Campbell's pork and beans and drill a bunch of holes in it. Then I place 3 charcoal briquettes in this can and light them up. I let them burn for a bit then I place another smaller soup can with the wood chips inside the large can. The large can will provide the fire and the small can keeps the wood chips from directly touching the fire which allows them to smolder. I place this device on the bottom rack of my masterbuilt smoker and place the cheese about 3 racks above. This works quite well for making smoke with little heat.

Every so often, you will need to use a pair of channel-lock pliers to remove the small wood chip can, so you can add another charcoal briquette.

Smoke for about 2 hours.
 

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The key to smoking cheese is using the “cold smoke” method, with minimal heat as many other previous posters noted. Temperature should not exceed 90 degrees, much easier accomplished with an off-set smoker where the cheese is smoked while not subjected to heat. I’ve found smoking cheese easiest during winter when the ambient temps are colder. My first smoker years ago was an Electric Masterbuilt smoker, it was difficult to smoke cheese with this rig but it could be done on very cold days and using a frozen block of ice in a metal pan.

Even on the lowest setting, the internal temp on the electric smoker would exceed 90, to aid in lowering the temp I would freeze water in a deep dish metal pan and place above the burner on the lowest rack wrapped in foil to deflect heat. My current rig is an offset smoker and which I typically use a mix of hardwood charcoal and Alder wood for smoking cheese. I’ve found the alder wood produces a nice smoke that isn’t too strong in flavor, especially for soft cheeses.
 
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