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Do you guys still fish bead heads when the water isn't that deep and rather slow? I always wonder if I would be better off without BH nymps than with sometimes in these situations. For example, rather slow water less than 4 ft deep, and relatively clear
 

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My rule is early season use bead heads late season (summer not so much) if the water has color and decent flow i typically am using beadhead.

If you are fishing really slow water gently pull the flies along. Some times the somewhat faster movement can trigger a strike. Also a slow lift at the end of a drift can also trigger strikes.
 

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i use beadheads all year long, in slow, fast, deep, shallow, clear or muddy it doesnt matter i still use them or a heavy weighted flies and i catch a pile of fish....but u can use a dry dropper rig in the type of water ur asking about or still even a indi just adjust it to the right depth
 

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bowmike, if you don't usually carry beadheads, will adding split shot be enough? Isn't the bead mainly to help get the nymph down deeper with the secondary effect of some added flash for attraction?
 

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I always felt that while the bead did help get the fly down, that the gold bead provided more of an attraction vs weight benefit. Most of my nymphs are wrapped in lead to aid in the sinking.
 

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if u are worried about the gold then use a black or a copper or a unfinished bead there are alot of opitions out there
 

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Nymphing in a long slow stretch, use something to suspend the nymph.

You can fish with a "dry and dropper. Use a dry fly that really floats well, like a Stimulator, tie some tippet to the bend of the hook, then tie on your nymph.

Or use a strike indicator to suspend the nymph and float out the long slow stretch.

When you spend the nymph like this, the nymph will sink only so far. The dry fly or strike indicator will keep it from continuing toward the bottom.

And yes you can use beadheads in these places. If the water is slow moving and pretty clear, you will probably do better with a small beadhead nymph than a larger one, because the fish have more time to look it over then when fishing fast broken water.
 

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troutbert said:
Nymphing in a long slow stretch, use something to suspend the nymph.

You can fish with a "dry and dropper. Use a dry fly that really floats well, like a Stimulator, tie some tippet to the bend of the hook, then tie on your nymph.

Or use a strike indicator to suspend the nymph and float out the long slow stretch.

When you spend the nymph like this, the nymph will sink only so far. The dry fly or strike indicator will keep it from continuing toward the bottom.

And yes you can use beadheads in these places. If the water is slow moving and pretty clear, you will probably do better with a small beadhead nymph than a larger one, because the fish have more time to look it over then when fishing fast broken water.
Spot on!
 

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You guys are a veritable cornucopia of information!! THX!!
 

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I wouldn't spend too much time nymphing slow water though. That's just hard.

You'll catch more trout where the water has more flow. So, instead spending a lot of time trying to nymph the slow water in the middle and tail of a pool, fish very thoroughly where the water comes off the riffle and into the head of the pool. That's the hotspot.

Also, look for pockets and slots in the riffles and rapids, and drift your nymphs through there. Any time you see a slot next to cover such as boulders or downed trees, or undercut tree roots, drift your nymphs through there.

Nymphing is a lot like drifting worms. Not that that's a bad thing. ;-)
 
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