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Discussion Starter #1
I have been shooting trap for about 20 years and enjoy it a great deal. However, I have recently been introduced to skeet and have become captivated by the sport. I am at a point where I want to invest in a skeet gun and can not decided on what to choose.
I know that I want a 20 gage o/u and I am kind of leaning in the direction of a Browning 725 skeet gun.
i wold like to hear from folks who have suggestions and comments, not only on the Browning 725, but any skeet gun they would recommend taking a look at.
 

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The Citori is a great choice but do get one with 3" chambers due to someday wanting to use it for other pursuits. I've used a Citori 12 since 1982 for everything including skeet, trap and sporting clays and certainly waterfowl.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey there BP, that's a great offer and I do appreciate it. But I am just beginning my search and I don't want to make a commitment to something that I know nothing about, and have never had a chance to handle one or shoot one.
So at this point I am just trying to collect information, favorable or unfavorable, on skeet guns from folks who have used them.
Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
eastbank, nice pics.

What is the difference between a field gun and a skeet gun? Rib height looks the same. Is it mostly the barrel length and balance of the gun? Maybe weight, back-bored tubes???

I have a lot to learn about these guns.
 

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A major factor is, does the gun fit you or can it be made to fit you. If you can go to big shoot where there are lots of vendors you can shoot the guns just by giving them your drivers license.
 

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The manufacturer of the gun and the type does not matter. The key is, does the gun fit you and does it respond to you moments when the the bird comes out of the house. Brands are the least of the equation. Before you buy a gun dedicated to skeet shooting, you should try several shotguns on the skeet range to see which one feels right and you can shoot the best.
 
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