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Discussion Starter #1
I have been shooting the xbow a good bit of late but I am having trouble with consistency over 20 yards. At 25 it hits low and 30 even lower. I have adjusted the site but then 20 is out of whack. How far are you guys shooting? Do you have drop off? Are my bolts (cheap from Walmart) not good enough? New to this so looking for tips. Thank you
 

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So, I'm not sure I understand. I apologize if I am telling you stuff you already know, but I figured I'd just say it.

Unlike a shell from a firearm, a bolt drops from the instant it travels from your xbow. It never rises. Are you using a xbow scope? Every xbow scope I've ever used has a big X or dot at 20 yards. Then, it has smaller X's or dots at each 10 yard increment from there on (so a 30 yard dot, a 40 yard dot, a 50 yard dot, etc.). You will notice the space between them gets larger and larger (as the drop increases with distance).

So, if you are saying the bolt hits below your 20 yard dot when you are shooting 30 yards, that's the way it's supposed to be. You need to aim using the 30 yard dot.

If, however, you are saying your bolt hits below the 30 yard dot on a 30 yard shot but is POA on a 20 yard shot, then your scope is probably not adjusted for the speed of your bow. Most xbow scopes have a magnification adjuster. Once you zero it at 20 yards, you then adjust the magnification so you're spot on at 30yards. At that point, you should be spot on at further distances as well.

In other words, the scope is just "guessing" at how much drop you'll have. The actual drop will depend on the speed. So, you have to adjust the magnification of the scope to get the dots to line up to POA at distances further than 20 yards. Zero in as you normally would with a rifle (using the windage and elevation adjustments) at 20 yards....then, only adjust magnification to get zero'd at 30 years, then all of your dots should be good.

In terms of how far to shoot, that's really personal choice. I practice out to 50 yards routinely. In the field, I would probably never take a shot at an animal above 40 yards. First, they do have time to react to the sound the further you go out. Also, my groups get bigger the further I go out. Also, in the real world, I don't shoot as well as I do from my back yard with a nice rest.

If I misunderstood your question, please reply.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No you did not misunderstand, you were spot on. Basically just like pins on a regular bow site. However the scope (red dot) does not have various reticles. It is a single dot, likely not intended originally for the crossbow, it was on their already. Based on that and your explanation it is a possibility I may need to purchase a scope intended for a crossbow.
 

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Yea, it's really hard to "guess" how much drop. I shoot a real fast bow. My 30 yard dot is nearly touching my 20, but then it gets more and more spread out. You definitely need a xbow scope and I would really look for one that is adjustable (i.e. magnification is adjustable). Some are not. If they aren't you have to just try out each range (you will be POA at 20, maybe a little high at 30, low at 40, etc....)

Look on Amazon to get some ideas....Hawke makes some really good xbow scopes. But any xbow specific scope will do.
 

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It's a speed selector ring on the better scopes not magnification.Lower end Hawke scopes are set up for 315 fps.The higher cost Hawke scopes have the speed ring.You can download a ballistic chart from Hawke and print it out for your speed.
 

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Slower crossbow can drop quite a bit between 20 and 30. Two options...

Keep the single red-dot and sight it in for 25. Just have to adjust your aim slightly high for the 30 yard shot.

Other option is to purchase a Hawke crossbow scope with a speed dial. You can then match the multi-reticle to the precise drop of your crossbow.
 

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It's a speed selector ring on the better scopes not magnification.Lower end Hawke scopes are set up for 315 fps.The higher cost Hawke scopes have the speed ring.You can download a ballistic chart from Hawke and print it out for your speed.
The speed selector simply adjust the magnification. That's all it's doing. It's a magnification dial labelled with FPS instead of 1x, 2x, 3x, etc.
 

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So, I'm not sure I understand. I apologize if I am telling you stuff you already know, but I figured I'd just say it.

Unlike a shell from a firearm, a bolt drops from the instant it travels from your xbow. It never rises. Are you using a xbow scope? Every xbow scope I've ever used has a big X or dot at 20 yards. Then, it has smaller X's or dots at each 10 yard increment from there on (so a 30 yard dot, a 40 yard dot, a 50 yard dot, etc.). You will notice the space between them gets larger and larger (as the drop increases with distance).

So, if you are saying the bolt hits below your 20 yard dot when you are shooting 30 yards, that's the way it's supposed to be. You need to aim using the 30 yard dot.

If, however, you are saying your bolt hits below the 30 yard dot on a 30 yard shot but is POA on a 20 yard shot, then your scope is probably not adjusted for the speed of your bow. Most xbow scopes have a magnification adjuster. Once you zero it at 20 yards, you then adjust the magnification so you're spot on at 30yards. At that point, you should be spot on at further distances as well.

In other words, the scope is just "guessing" at how much drop you'll have. The actual drop will depend on the speed. So, you have to adjust the magnification of the scope to get the dots to line up to POA at distances further than 20 yards. Zero in as you normally would with a rifle (using the windage and elevation adjustments) at 20 yards....then, only adjust magnification to get zero'd at 30 years, then all of your dots should be good.

In terms of how far to shoot, that's really personal choice. I practice out to 50 yards routinely. In the field, I would probably never take a shot at an animal above 40 yards. First, they do have time to react to the sound the further you go out. Also, my groups get bigger the further I go out. Also, in the real world, I don't shoot as well as I do from my back yard with a nice rest.

If I misunderstood your question, please reply.
Not to stray from the OP but Bullets drop too they don't actually rise from the axis of the bore.
 

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If I understand you correctly you use a single dot. That would be better on a .22 than a crossbow. You can get a multiple dot crossbow red dot scope pretty cheap. I would get the best one you could afford with 3 or 4 dots for a crossbow. It will help your shooting a lot. If you can afford it a crossbow scope with 2x magnification I use one that cost $89 on sale. It has 5 crosshairs and it improved my shooting tremendously.
 

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Make sure when you mount your scope that the mounting screws are square in the threads.. If they go in somewhat side ways your scope will shoot all over the place. You think you have a bad scope and it's really the mounting screws on the scope not being squared. I was told this by Bow Hunters Warehouse in Rossville, Pa.. I guess the best way to tell is when you screw them in that they go in easy... Surely you have screwed in a screw and it fights you...Just keep that in the back of your minds should your scopes both gun or crossbow shoot all over the target or won't zero.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the help guys. I went and bought a new scope that was meant for a crossbow. Should have it by Monday and we will see from there.
 

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yeah my scope I got with my Excalibur has sites from 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 yards and don't shoot past that....but then again I built my arrows to travel out to 50 yards as well....
 

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Just gitcha one of the new Ravins that shoots 3 inch groups at 100 yards and you oughta be good to go. Yep.
 

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Just gitcha one of the new Ravins that shoots 3 inch groups at 100 yards and you oughta be good to go. Yep.
huh ? no arrow should be shot that far at living game PERIOD !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!....
 

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One of the biggest things that will improve a good crossbow is a great scope. I shoot an Excalibur Matrix 380. I have the Tact-Zone scope in which I love. Multiple markings, and for low light illuminated markings. I practice out to 60 yards--it's a tack driver. However--and I say loudly HOWEVER--my longest shot was 38 yards on deer. My self imposed limit is 40 yards. Granted folks who hunt in western states shoot some pretty far ranges. I will say this--A deer is a very fast animal when reacting to danger. If, and when we take extremely long shots a lot of things can go wrong. At farther ranges I like to have a VERY calm animal. If the animal shows signs of being nervous, jittery, and is on high alert taking long range shots is a recipe for disaster. Now--to the idea of shooting out to 100 yards with a crossbow. Even at speeds of over 400fps--that's still slow in the grand scheme, or spectrum of things when we compare that to the speed of sound. As per the international definition at sea level the speed of sound is 1108fps, and can vary up to about 1125fps. At ranges such as 50-100 yards a whole of things can wrong. A deer, of for that matter any game animal can bolt erratically, and that arrow/bolt that was just let loose is NOT even remotely going to end up where you intended it to go. Taking shots like this are totally irresponsible in my opinion. By using a good quality scope on your crossbow, and getting it all shot in--knowing how it shoots, and using an arrow/bolt combination that shoots accurately on a repeated basis is the way to go. Keep your shot range in a range that YOU know full well you can actually make. For me I like 40 yards, and under to be fully confident. Now I would be able to push that to 50 yards, but everything would have to be absolutely perfect. The problem here with me as with many hunters--The crossbow, bow, or other weapon is fully capable of longer ranges---However the person using the weapon of choice is many times NOT capable of making that weapon perform to it's maximum capabilities.
 

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While I cannot impose, nor would I attempt to ever force my ethics onto another when it comes to shot distance, and equipment choices I will however say--ANY crossbow is still a relative short range weapon as are most all arrow slinging devices. When I hear, or read advertising slogans such as "Rifle like design", "Capable of 100 yard accuracy", "More punishing down range energy", "Superior accuracy'--lets face it--it grabs ones attention. It's all marketing. We must however read into this, and really understand the limitations of the crossbow, and the limitations of the person who will use it. Anyone who has hunted using archery tackle knows full well that a whole lot of things need to come together to take game. On the flip side of that coin is the fact that many, and most times things do NOT come together as we would like, or have planned for. Every game animal encounter has little things that are different--distance, animal angle, how the animal is acting, watching, and waiting for that perfect moment to take the shot--so much, and many scenarios that change rapidly. Experience can be a painful teacher in our sport. Those who come up with, and put out these fancy marketing slogans are not sitting beside you in the treestand, or blind when the moment of truth presents itself. When it comes to that moment of truth--when luck, and preparedness come together each individual must have the ability to know without exception the limitations, capabilities, and abilities of their equipment, and themselves. When we operate outside those limits things usually tend to go wrong pretty quick.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
So I bought a Truglo 4X32 scope. I went to mount it and the rigs don't fit securely on the rail. The crossbow is an older TenPoint (about 2001-02). Any suggestions on a ring and/or rail combination tat would work?
 
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