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Discussion Starter #1
I've been toying with the Idea of adding an auto ordinance .45 Thompson to my service rifle collection. Only problem is that if I do it its gonna be the SBR model with a 10" barrel so I can keep it as close to GI spec as possible.
I've been researching the rules and regulations governing ownership of a SBR and it is mind boggling.
Do any of you on here own a SBR?
Is the BATF paperwork really worth all the hassle?
The tax isnt that much, but the guidelines on transportation of it and the reports are ludicrous.
The more I research the more I feel I'm just inviting myself into a huge hassle with the BATF.
Any one on here go through the trouble for a SBR?
 

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Since it is never going to be a true collector, I'd go with the longer barrel and avoid all the hassle of the BATF. A friend has the longer barrel model and it is fun to shoot, not as nicely machined as the original full auto piece, but nice.

BATF always has the right to spot check on the licensed weapon...something I'd not let myself in for.
 

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You'll be far better off just buying the current version and enjoying it, my opinion.

A buddy bought a new one some years ago. It's fun to shoot and brings no hassles with it.
 

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"It's a hassle" is kinda subjective. For most people it is the (usually) $200 "stamp" that bothers them, and the "voodoo" factor. If "NFA" interests you, I would recommend setting up a "Trust". There are several advantages.
(no finger print & "police chief sign offs", multiple people can be "authorized" to "possess" them, simplifies the "when you die" issue.

The "NFA game" isn't "cheap", but can be fun if that is "your thing".
If you go the trust route, it is simply "reprinting" a page, filling out the paperwork for the "new toy", and sending your check.

There are many "myths" surrounding NFA weapons, all of which are from people who have no clue.
 

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I "have a clue" and opined that the poster's quest for a SBR version of the Tommy Gun, is probably more bother than it's worth.

Now, if I could afford a select fire Tommy, well then heck yeah?

 

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Discussion Starter #6
DennyF said:
if I could afford a select fire Tommy, well then heck yeah?

I'd have never even posted my question, but if I was to come into a ton of money via the lottery...select fire open bolt operation all the way!

The spot checks? thats what I'm talking about... If I'm going to pay the tax and follow the rediculous rules governing transport and then I'm gonna have to open my home at any time so they can 'check'/hassle? If thats the case, which is what my post question was about, then I'd have to settle on a 16" model from A O. which I wont do, cause the 10" was GI.
only a pipe dream!
thanks for input
 

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Harrysigafoo said:
Since it is never going to be a true collector, I'd go with the longer barrel and avoid all the hassle of the BATF. A friend has the longer barrel model and it is fun to shoot, not as nicely machined as the original full auto piece, but nice.

BATF always has the right to spot check on the licensed weapon...something I'd not let myself in for.
I know this is an old thread.. ...but the ATF doesn't have the right to do a spot check of transferred/manufactured NFA weapons in private hands. There is no license.. It is a tax paid registration, which you get a canceled stamp to show you paid the tax.


The paperwork is pretty easy. You fill out a Form 1 to make an NFA device, or a Form 4 to transfer an existing unit. You then get it signed by a CLEO. Then you get fingerprints and passport pictures. You also fill out an affidavit. You mail it in with a $200 check or money order, then wait for them to approve or deny. If you can legally own a gun, they will approve it.
 

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Yep. All one has to do is decide if they want to go through all that, just to legally own something classified as an SBR.

Or, they can plunk down the wad of cash for a "normal" Thompson that reguires the same amount of paperwork and fees that the purchase of any other long gun carries with it?

It's a decision anyone is free to make.
 

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As others have said..it is not a big problem to aquire a SBR. I purchased a Sig swat 223 handgun. Filed the paperwork to make it a SBR (I added a fixed stock). As stated, make up the paperwork, get Law enforcemant cert, fingerprints, mugshots and pay 200.00 Now I have a very fine 10 inch bbl 223 entry rifle. Mighty fine. Doc in Pa.
 
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