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If this is in the wrong sub forum I apologize. Just wanted to give everyone a heads up if you run dogs around that area Of SGL 42.

Back in the beginning of April I took my setter for a run and to do some scouting. He got into a porcupine and got absolutely covered in quills. I know they’ve always been there But seems like just recently I have seen a high influx in porcupines up there. Like in the last 3-4 years.
 

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I had the same issue in a game lands in Schuylkill County. I guess it is somewhat inevitable. My pup had them all over her face, mouth and tongue.
 

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I had the same thing happened to my English pointer, I don't know if he had the biggest set of balls or was dumb. He went after it 3 times and and in addition to your dog springer Rage, my dog also had them throughout his paws.

I was told by the vet doctor not to pullout any quills unless you clip the ends off to allow the air to escape on the quills.
 

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My buddy had his beagles get into them 3 straight days in different spots last week.
He was not happy.

We have had 1 encounter this spring.
Always carry a Leatherman on my belt.

John L
 

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I was told by the vet doctor not to pullout any quills unless you clip the ends off to allow the air to escape on the quills.
If a vet told you that, you need a new vet. While the quills are hollow, cutting them wont deflate them making them easier to pull. All that will accomplish is more sharp points laying around for you to either get your hands on, or worse yet in the dogs mouth. Quills have barbs on the end of them which makes it difficult to pull them. If a dog is quilled get them out as quickly as possible before swelling starts making them even harder to pull out. For quills that pierced the mouth you are better bulling them out from the inside so you dont have to pull the barb back thru the skin.
 

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I hunt not far from there and it seems like the area is polluted with them. Don’t think I had a single morning this Turkey season where I didn’t have to dodge one with my truck.
 

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I had the same thing happened to my English pointer, I don't know if he had the biggest set of balls or was dumb. He went after it 3 times and and in addition to your dog springer Rage, my dog also had them throughout his paws.

I was told by the vet doctor not to pullout any quills unless you clip the ends off to allow the air to escape on the quills.
Find a new vet because that one doesn't know what they're talking about, at least when it comes to porcupine quills. Cutting the ends of the quills does nothing except prolong the time it takes to remove them. It's a complete myth.
 

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Some dogs never learn and will attack every porcupine they see. Thankfully mine was smart enough to figure it out after just one encounter with a live one. We encounter several of them every year while we are hunting. Since the first one he has just pointed and barked at them.

But if he finds a dead one that is a different story. Once it is dead and partly scavenged he seems to think he is ok to try getting a bite of it too. Twice I had to pull a couple quills he got in his lips or paws from dead ones.

Dick Bodenhorn
 

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Mine got into two less than 12 hours a part.I was lucky enough to find a couple deads one over the next week that were hanging in bushes so I took the time to do some avoidance training.She rarely barks so when I hear her barking,I know she has one bayed.She doesn't sit there and point at them though.We let them escape because I don't want her to think that's a species that we're targeting.

GSP's use their paws when they fight so it doesn't surprise my that an English pointer would do the same thing.
 

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I think they get it in their paws most often just from trying to get the quills out of their face after an encounter. That's what I've observed in the past anyway with my two wirehairs (who, knock on wood, seem keen to just avoid them now.)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It was so bad that he had to be put under a few times to get them all out, but I agree a leatherman is a must for bird dogs.

They seem like their numbers have exploded. Ill be doing some avoidance training for sure and hopefully clearing some out in the area. I don’t see as many in the fall as I do the spring though.
 

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My male dog never touches them, at least not yet. My little female has had a running battle going with them for nearly ten years now. I don't recall how many times I've pulled quills out of her myself but she's had at least 4 or 5 episodes that required a vet visit. When they get close to the eyes or in the very back of the mouth and there's a lot of them I opt for professional help. Nothing will prevent her from attacking one if she sees it and believe me we've tried everything. I had her professionally 'snake broke' a few years ago twice and she's never bothered a snake. Used exactly the same technique with porkies...forget it.
 
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