The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,757 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have found,over the half century plus,of hunting,that you have to see what you are looking at?????
You must be able to see your game animal when it is standing still,not just moving. Deer are tough to see in the brush or laying down in the autumn leaves,but you can do it! In snow its not to hard to do?
Myself,the white on a deer around its ears,its nose or its tail is my sight tip off. The tail,when not up in the air,has a white line around it,as you may know?
Any ways,how do you get or teach some one to look for these things? My sons and my grandson,have this ability. My grandsons father[he is married to my daughter] could not see a 100 foot oak tree in a desert! He has shoot 3 deer, over the years,but my grandson pointed them out to him!!!!!!
How about you folks,can you do this????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,809 Posts
Horizontal lines is the key factor I look for in the woods. Movement is also something I will key in on. Often the flick of an ear or tail will get my attention before I "see" that it is a deer. But there are still times when I look and POOF there's a deer standing 20 feet away - don't know how they do that
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
Friday before doe season I watched a doe stand still maybe 50 yds away, not moving a muscle for a timed 20 minutes! Saturday I watched a stump bear for - well too long. The doe would almost vanish she was so still and blended with the background.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,422 Posts
The thing I do is scan the area real good and then rescan for things that might have changed,then once these things are located I go into almost a tunnel vision burning a hole into the object until satisfied with what is there,I repeat this process throughout the hunt always looking for subtle differences or changes and always checking the more shadowed areas very closely.When looking into brushy areas I always look for the glare of an antler tip,the flick of an ear or tail,the slight movement of a leg or any bodily part,outlines that just don't seem to fit,do all this instead of focusing in the distance constantly waiting for the deer to show up in plain site and your odds might get better.One last thing that always sticks in my mind,don't focus on the distance and forget what just might be right in front of you,deer are sneaky critters and can sneak in without you ever knowing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,896 Posts
I have been very successfully doing that. What i do is when i get close to a brushy area i scan with my binoculars in the brush piles. I have shot quite a few deer doing that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,757 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
My youngest sons first doe was a stump???? Well,that's what he thought it was!
In 1990 he had an antler less lic. I didn't get one. It snowed a lot the night before. If you can recall,it was well over 24 inches deep. I found a place where we could park and a water company road that was plowed,but was gated shut. We walked the road and watched down a small hill side. There were lots of Hemlock trees there. These had a circle of no snow under them,just leaves and brown! About a half mile of walking and i see a doe! It is curled up and facing away from us,but i could see her. It was about 75 yards away. I said to him,"Look under that Hemlock.There is a deer there!"
His reply,"That's a stump?"Well, I told him to shoot the stump,in the middle of it!" He did and hair flew and the deer was his! From that day on he learned how find deer in places that a lot others can not see them and has gotten really good at it.
That day,after we had the deer up on the trail out,we ran into 4 or 5 others hunters leaving and wanting to know where he shot it? The drag trail,up the hill showed them and a few of them said they looked down there a bunch of times and never seen the deer laying there!It must have been bedded there prior to the snow storm for there where no tracks up to the Hemlock
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
I look for horrizontal lines. The majority of things in the woods grow vertically. Then I look for colors that are out of place.

But then again, if conditions are right, I'll close my eyes and just use my hearing to locate movement. Something my grandfather taught me years ago (try it during squirrel hunting, amazing what you can hear.) Also used it a lot in the military on night ops. Makes you focus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,139 Posts
I do it year in and year out. Scanning into areas with brush, you can see beyond the brush by moving the focus. When Im still hunting, Ill scan an area for a few minutes and then stand there and watch, rarely do deer stand completely still without like others have said flicking their tail, ears, moving their head. A very good exercise especially in thick woods, when you see a deer (obviously one you dont want to shoot) take your eyes off it and they find it again, at a distance it doesn't take much of a tree or branch to completely hide a deer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,211 Posts
Not bragging but I have a very good "game eye". As a kid I spent hours with Hidden Pictures and sight games involving the identification of changes in the comparison of 2 or three drawings or photographs. I did not do any of that as training for hunting but rather because I just liked it. When I started hunting all of that came into play. In addition I learned to look at a view in the woods and change my sight perspective by crouching or very small different view angles focused on the same field of view. Came in real handy when I was in the USMC too.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,016 Posts
Stay off the cell phones and video games while hunting. Keep you eyes and ears at full alert.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
IMHO if you using only your sight your in a sense.. limited.


For me the most obvious is the smell. Deer smell like the forest. A pungent mix of fall leaves, brush, and wet grass. Does smell like sweet wild flowers. Bucks smell a tinge like old spice. You can smell them before you hear them.

Next is your hearing. Listening closely you can hear much more than you see. The gentle scrape of a brush against the soft fur. The snapping of a twig. The jostling of leaves on the ground. The slight stomp they do when the think they see something. The flutter of the hairs on their back when they alert to your presence.

Of course I generally hunt by stalking in thick upland brush so this wouldn't work for deer at 200 yards. Most of mine are taken at less than 15.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,197 Posts
Deer make it tough because of their ability to remain motionless for a near eternity. Glassing for bears, different story. A guide in Alaska had this advice....give them the 3 Second Rule. Meaning if you see something and suspect it might be a bear, brown or black, watch it and if it doesn't move in 3 seconds, it's not a bear. Bears can't remain still, they're always fidgeting or moving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,534 Posts
Don't use the three second rule on turkeys. Use the 45 minute rule. I once watched a gobbler stand as still as a statue for 45 minutes. When he finally moved I shot him.

Steve.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,279 Posts
stanb999 said:
For me the most obvious is the smell. Deer smell like the forest. A pungent mix of fall leaves, brush, and wet grass. Does smell like sweet wild flowers. Bucks smell a tinge like old spice. You can smell them before you hear them.
???????????????????????

So there's a deer smell, a doe smell and a buck smell....imagine that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,133 Posts
Freytown said:
stanb999 said:
For me the most obvious is the smell. Deer smell like the forest. A pungent mix of fall leaves, brush, and wet grass. Does smell like sweet wild flowers. Bucks smell a tinge like old spice. You can smell them before you hear them.
???????????????????????

So there's a deer smell, a doe smell and a buck smell....imagine that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,421 Posts
icemole said:
Horizontal lines is the key factor I look for in the woods. Movement is also something I will key in on. Often the flick of an ear or tail will get my attention before I "see" that it is a deer. But there are still times when I look and POOF there's a deer standing 20 feet away - don't know how they do that
X2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,251 Posts
I bought a pair of glasses for distance and hunted with them for the first time this year. You have to watch you don't fog them up when it's cold, but I can see a tick on a deer at 50 yards now.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top